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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Secrets Of The Most Shared Business Publishers

Secrets Of The Most Shared Business Publishers | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

This week we used Insights data to see how some different business sites are performing on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter during the month of September to yesterday (September 1 to 24).


Business news is hotly discussed in the social space. Some of the most talked about digital news sites of recent times (Business Insider, Quartz) cover business daily, while stalwarts like the Wall Street Journal and Forbes have also made themselves very visible in the new social landscape.


We picked seven prominent sites and ran some queries in our Insights dashboard:

The Financial Times

The Wall Street Journal

Quartz

Business Insider

Harvard Business Review

Forbes

Bloomberg.com


We used the data to analyze the biggest stories by network, the most ‘social’ writers at different sites, and overall site performance. Insights also allowed us to graph their average share counts per story....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lots of valuable business news insight in this report.

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Austin Musgrove's curator insight, September 28, 2014 5:48 PM

I found this article very interesting because it relates to my Social Media project.  I chose to analyze Forbes in the Magazine industry.  The article identified many different strengths of Forbes Magazine and directly compared them to other business publishers.  Forbes proved to be the most shared publisher on LinkedIn and had the most overall tweets on Twitter.  I also discovered that Forbes had some of the most popular articles for the month of September.  I look forward to analyzing my own data for the project and comparing it with this article! 

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Tool Called Dataminr Hunts for News in the Din of Twitter | NY Times

Tool Called Dataminr Hunts for News in the Din of Twitter | NY Times | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Earlier this year, several producers at CNN received an alert from a new digital news-gathering tool that they were testing: A teenager in Los Angeles had posted a tweet saying that the pop music heartthrob Justin Bieber had been arrested.

CNN’s Los Angeles bureau followed up on the tip by calling the appropriate local precinct. The police said that they were pursuing an attempted robbery complaint against Mr. Bieber, but wanted to know how the cable news network could possibly have known that.

The answer is Dataminr, a software tool aimed specifically at analyzing billions of Twitter postings for patterns that could indicate breaking news. On Tuesday, Dataminr becomes commercially available to news organizations, some of which — like CNN and Gannett — have already been testing the software.

“On the whole this is one of the best technical tools we have,” said Richard T. Griffiths, senior editorial director at CNN. “Besides our local affiliates, it is probably our best source of story leads, and you live or die by your leads.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Big data is helping journalism uncover leads.

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Making the headlines | The Economist

Making the headlines | The Economist | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

.Once, these analysts would have written “big-picture” pieces, says Mr Kundnani. But 24-hour news and Twitter demand on-the-fly reporting and analysis, which blend into journalism. Nathan Thrall, the ICG’s Middle East analyst, based in Jerusalem, has written about the conflict in Gaza for, among others, the New York Times and the London Review of Books.


Some journalism, meanwhile, is becoming more wonkish. In April the New York Times launched the Upshot, which features data-packed articles—many written by wonks. “Wonkblog”, by the Washington Post, contains stories explained “in one chart”. In January one of its best-known writers, Ezra Klein, left to launch a website, Vox, that does something similar.


For politicians, policymakers and readers, more journalism means more information and choice. Inaccuracies can be quickly challenged and there is always a second opinion. For journalists, the news is not so good. Twitter, blogs and newsletters can get a think-tank’s ideas to its audience direct. Hence a relationship that used to be symbiotic, with wonks helping create news and hacks distributing it, is becoming competitive—especially in the battle for influential readers, such as politicians....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

How the dividing line between public policy and journalism is disappearing. Is it a good thing? It's worth contemplating.

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Marco Favero's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:05 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

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As tech firms take on the role of newsrooms, will they care about legal fights for public interest?

As tech firms take on the role of newsrooms, will they care about legal fights for public interest? | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Newspapers were at the center of many free speech and access-to-information battles of the last century, but those days are all but done. Most newspapers are a husk of their former selves, and their legal budgets are as desiccated as the classified ad sections that once made them rich.


This raises the question of who will fund high-stakes public interest battles instead. Will it be the tech giants, like Google and Twitter, whose platforms have largely supplanted the newspapers as a daily source of information? Or does the tech industry’s fixation with growth and data control preclude it from truly taking up the public interest torch?...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Will tech companies be willing or able to pick up the torch of the public interest like the old media?

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A Second Look At The Giant Garbage Pile That Is Online Media, 2014 | The Dish

A Second Look At The Giant Garbage Pile That Is Online Media, 2014 | The Dish | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The majority of the shit described in this blog post is useless.


The world doesn’t need 5,000 separate-but-barely-distinct versions of every damn story from every damn field of human endeavor. The people getting paid (barely) to produce those slightly differentiated versions of every story ever are wasting their time, unless “able to crop a picture of a celebrity in WordPress without help” becomes, suddenly, a much scarcer and more in-demand skill.


The reader, in nearly every case, is getting a less-good version (or several less-good versions) of the story than whatever the original was. The vast majority of this sort of aggregation could be replaced with one curated Twitter feed that every website in existence could run on a siderail, and the media consumer would benefit. And even in that scenario, the bottom-rung producers of content are still effectively screwed. So I don’t know. Maybe it’s time to consider an organized aggregator work slowdown?

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Takes about takes do not good journalism make writes Alex Pareene.

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This isn’t beat journalism. This is journalism in beta.

This isn’t beat journalism. This is journalism in beta. | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Storyful recently launched a new Newswire to some of the biggest newsrooms around the world. Today, Chief of Product Adam Thomas (@datatheism) outlines what's new. Modern news is evolving. Journalists need to find news fast.


This is where the magic happens. Essential videos, images and embedded social media, all verified by Storyful’s journalists and augmented with context, dates, geodata, maps, local photographs, corroborating social media and – crucially – contact information for sources, so that journalists can follow up, cross-check and create their own unique angle.


The journey from Newswire to article (or TV segment, or online video package, or listicle, or …) is vastly improved, with the aim to be as frictionless as possible. Where available, every piece of media now has download, share and embed buttons. If a content creator has opted to license their content, you contact us for instant guidance on prices and usage....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Has Storyful reinvented the newswire with the launch of its Newswire product? Time will tell.

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The growing pay gap between journalism and public relations | Pew Research Center

The growing pay gap between journalism and public relations | Pew Research Center | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

After years of grim news for the news industry marked by seemingly endless rounds of staff cutbacks, it’s not unusual for those thinking about a career in journalism or veterans trying to find a new job to look at options in related fields. One field outpacing journalism both in sheer numbers and in salary growth is public relations.


The salary gap between public relations specialists and news reporters has widened over the past decade – to almost $20,000 a year, according to 2013 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data analyzed by the Pew Research Center. At the same time, the public relations field has expanded to a degree that these specialists now outnumber reporters by nearly 5 to 1 (BLS data include part-time and full-time employees, but not self-employed.)...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Interesting stats, job growth for PR and substantial job losses for reporters between 2004 and 2013.

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How the Smartphone Ushered In a Golden Age of Journalism | WIRED

How the Smartphone Ushered In a Golden Age of Journalism | WIRED | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

F...It may have been coincidental, but around the time this new truism started sinking in, we began to see investment in businesses both new and old that promised serious journalism. Facebook cofounder Chris Hughes bought The New Republic; Jeff Bezos bought The Washington Post; eBay billionaire Pierre Omidyar pledged $250 million to fund First Look Media, which hired Glenn Greenwald, one of the reporters who broke the Snowden revelations in The Guardian. Vox Media, home of tech site the Verge, raised $38 million and BuzzFeed $35 million in new rounds of funding.


With money has come innovation, both in journalism itself and in the tools to produce it. When Ezra Klein left the Post's Wonkblog for a new site funded by Vox Media, it was in part because Vox had built a sophisticated content management system designed with mobile readers in mind. Atavist—founded by WIRED alumni Evan Ratliff and Nicholas Thompson as a net-native platform for magazine-style journalism—built a similar platform that it licenses to other publishers. Such tool sets make it simple to create a seamless mix of text, video, music, maps, charts—a mix that, done right, spells the difference between just reading a story and taking a deep dive. Now this kind of enhanced storytelling is turning up in places beyond journalism, like the Brookings Institution's Brookings Essay, an online series typified by historian Margaret MacMillan's 7,000-word thought piece on the parallels between 1914 and 2014....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Despite the small format, the smartphone promises a new golden age of journalism. if you follow the grand profession, this is recommended reading. 09/10

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5 tools to transform or enhance text-heavy articles

5 tools to transform or enhance text-heavy articles | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

During the news:rewired conference last week, Ezra Eeman  of Journalism Tools gave delegates a list of essential tools journalists should be aware of when creating enganging content for their audiences. Some of these tools can be applied directly to text-based articles to add a multimedia element and, overall, a more colorful story.


There are 50,000 news apps every month, not counting new web online tools found around the internet which journalists can use, said Eeman, and it can be quite difficult to sift through them....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

5 tools worth looking at for journalists, PR and marketing pros.

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Newspaper reporter makes ‘endangered jobs’ list | Poynter.

Newspaper reporter makes ‘endangered jobs’ list | Poynter. | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Travel agent. Meter reader. Newspaper reporter.


They’re all among CareerCast’s 2014 list of endangered jobs, with the hiring outlook for newspaper reporter positions expected to drop 13 percent by 2022, according to the company’s forecast.


“Declining subscription and dwindling advertising sales have negatively impacted the hiring power of some newspapers, while others have ceased operations altogether,” the company writes in a 38-word epitaph for the field.


“Online outlets continue to replace traditional newspapers, and the long-term outlook for newspaper reporters reflects the change.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Right up there with lumberjacks. What a sad evolution. But maybe the problem is one of definition? Journalism skills will always be needed for communication, writing, native advertising, corporate journalism, and storytelling.

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Over 1000 journalists now exploring scraping techniques | Online Journalism Review

Over 1000 journalists now exploring scraping techniques | Online Journalism Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Last week the number of people who have bought my ebook Scraping for Journalists passed the 1,000 mark. That is, to me, incredible. A thousand journalists interested enough in scraping to buy a book? What happened?When I first began writing the book I imagined there might be perhaps 100 people in the world who would be interested in buying it. It was such a niche subject I didn’t even consider pitching it to my normal publishers....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Scraping is a valuable tool for bloggers, writers and PR pros. Well worth exploring, especially the half dozen stories that show how journalists are using the technique.

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BBC makes its training resources free to the public in 11 languages

BBC makes its training resources free to the public in 11 languages | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

If you're in the market for a free journalism education, hundreds of training materials are now at your disposal.If you're in the market for a free journalism education, hundreds of training materials are now at your disposal.


The BBC's College of Journalism made a slew of videos and guides - initially created to train its own journalists - available to reporters worldwide for free.You can watch videos and tutorials made by BBC journalists in the field on journalists' safety, social media,  multimedia  techniques, as well as subject and writing style guides galore. Check out the whole library here....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Awesome writing resource, free for the next 12 months. Maybe they'll extend that in the future?

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50 blogs for journalists, by journalists 2014 | Media news

50 blogs for journalists, by journalists 2014 | Media news | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A list of blogs by journalists, journalism academics and photo-journalists sharing tips and perspectives on topics such as social media, data journalism, apps, tools, and the latest developments in the industry.


The blogs are grouped by subject and are listed in random order. We have not included any blogs hosted by news organizations or other sites. This is an updated version of our 50 blogs by journalists, for journalists, published in January 2013....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

A list of journalists, photographers and academics blogging about the media industry, updated for 2014 by journalism.co.UK.

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6 Places Journalists Can Find Free Online Training | The Freelancer

As fall approaches, students head back to school. And while busy freelance journalists may not have the time or money to enroll in a college course, there are a number of free online training alternatives right at their fingertips, offering lessons on everything from understanding financial statements to covering healthcare reform.


Here’s a look at six of the top options to consider....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Excellent list of free online journalism training resources is not just for journalists. PR, content marketing and social marketing pros will also benefit.

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Alaska news reporter Charlo Greene quits live on air to campaign for marijuana legislation

Alaska news reporter Charlo Greene quits live on air to campaign for marijuana legislation | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A news reporter in Alaska dramatically quit her job live on air so she could campaign for the legalisation of marijuana in the US state.


Charlo Greene, a reporter for Alaska-based news channel KTVA-TV, revealed herself to be the owner of the Alaska Cannabis Club, a "medical marijuana collective" that serves patients throughout Alaska.


Greene has reported on the club several times without ever revealing her connection to it. However, during one segment of the news programme, she revealed herself to be the president of the pro-marijuana legalisation group before adding "f**k it, I quit".


Following her shock resignation, the camera cuts to a visibly stunned main anchor, who stumbles over an apology before adding "we'll...we'll be right back"....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Well, some days are like that. Job up in smoke... and the poor anchor left dangling.

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The invasion of corporate news - FT.com

The invasion of corporate news - FT.com | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A population of 100,000 is no longer a guarantee that a city like Richmond, California can sustain a thriving daily paper. Readers have drifted from the tactile pleasures of print to the digital gratification of their smartphone screens, and advertising revenues have drifted with them. Titles that once served up debates from City Hall, news of school teams’ triumphs and classified ads for outgrown bikes have stopped the presses for good.


Last January, however, a site called the Richmond Standard launched, promising “a community-driven daily news source dedicated to shining a light on the positive things that are going on in the community”, and giving everyone from athletes to entrepreneurs the recognition they deserve. Since then, it has recorded the “quick-thinking teen” commended by California’s governor for saving a woman from overdosing; the “incredible strength” of the 5ft 6in high-school freshman who can bench-press “a whopping 295lbs”; and councilman Tom Butt’s warning about the costs of vacating a blighted public housing project.


The Richmond Standard is one of the more polished sites to emerge in the age of hyper-local digital news brands such as Patch and DNAinfo.com. That may be because it is run and funded by Chevron, the $240bn oil group which owns the Richmond refinery that in August 2012 caught fire, spewing plumes of black smoke over the city and sending more than 15,000 residents to hospital for medical help....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Are corporate interests winning at the expense of objective journalism and community interest? It's a sobering question and one worth debate and discussion.

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Antoine Peters's curator insight, September 21, 2014 5:30 AM

Life is changing as fast as the way we do business.

JOSE ANTONIO DIAZ DIAZ's curator insight, September 21, 2014 4:29 PM

agregar do visión ...

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Today's Faves: Apple Watch, "glance journalism" and the new "neutron of news"

...I misjudged -- I didn't think nearly radically enough. The quick-hit stream of Twitter or the Facebook News Feed is giving way to a largely agnostic, mostly opt-in "notification layer" on top of the phone screen.

And yet even that notification layer feels larded in the context of the single-most-interesting media-industry detail from yesterday's Apple presentation:

We are about to enter the era of "glance journalism."

"Glance" is the name of the feature of the Apple Watch that let Watch-wearers skim through a series of not-quite-notifications. Maybe they are notifications, but only as a subset of a new class of ultra-brief news.

"Atomic unit" was a helpful metaphor, but we're now talking about the "proton/neutron" level.

"Glance journalism" makes tweets look like longform, typical news notifications (and even innovative atomized news apps) look like endless scroll and Seward's list of essential Things (chart, gif, quote, stat) look unresponsive.

What a wonderfully evocative word: "glance." Apple's capital-G appropriation of it -- and the primordial display on the keynote screen -- is what set my mind spinning yesterday afternoon.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

"Glance journalism"! What a wonderful phrase from Dan Shanoff. If that doesn't capture the age, I don't know what does. Recommended reading. 9/10

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What Fox News can teach us about how the Internet works

What Fox News can teach us about how the Internet works | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The definition of "all the news that's fit to print" has changed on the Internet.


It’s not only Jon Stewart. Over time, it’s become abundantly clear  to  many that Fox News doesn’t always do the best with living up to the slogan “Fair and Balanced.”


But occasionally, Fox steps over the line from being blatantly partisan to just plain wrong. Such was the case recently, when they picked up a story from the Washington Free Beacon on an Indiana University program calledTruthy, and spread it all around their website and network.


According to Fox, Truthy was designed so the government can monitor hate speech and other suspicious patterns onsocial media. As the network’s Megyn Kelly put it, Truthy amounts to “some bureaucrat deciding whether you are being hateful or misinforming people.


”Except that in this case, it was Kelly who was doing the misinforming. Truthy has actually been around for three years, so it isn’t some new weapon the government is trying to implement without our knowledge. Moreover, the project’s goal is not surveillance, but examination....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lessons in bad news from Fox and the Internet.

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CNN's Don Lemon Laments "Media Spectacle" At Michael Brown's Funeral (While Broadcasting From Funeral) - Daily Surge

CNN's Don Lemon Laments "Media Spectacle" At Michael Brown's Funeral (While Broadcasting From Funeral) - Daily Surge | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

As Their Ratings Skyrocket, CNN's Don Lemon Laments: Michael Brown Funeral Should Be More than "Media Spectacle"


Today was Michael Brown’s funeral. #MikeBrownFuneral was a top trend on Twitter. Multiple media outlets live streamed the service. Al Sharpton eulogized. At least three Obama administration officials attended. The Nation of Islam covered crowd control. Countless celebrities and entertainers were in attendance, and t-shirts were sold.


One thing is clear: Trumped by the politics of self-interest and ratings-boosting media narratives, Michael Brown’s death stopped being about Michael Brown almost immediately after he was pronounced dead....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

"Don Lemon tweeted about taking a “break from twitter today in respect for parents & lives lost. Not choosing sides.” He tweeted that with a picture of him hugging Michael Brown’s motherHashtag: #FAIL ", writes Jerome Hudson. 


Loaded with bitter irony, this post is recommended reading for those who follow journalism.

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Turns out plenty of readers think that payola in news is just peachy

Turns out plenty of readers think that payola in news is just peachy | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...Imagine, though, if it turned out that serious news consumers didn’t care about that stuff. Not just teens or those who get all their news from Buzzfeed lists and trending hashtags — but if actual, grown up readers didn’t give a flying toss about church and state.


If that were the case there’d be nothing to stop every financially-challenged newsroom (i.e. every newsroom in the world) from joining the race to the bottom: Selling every headline to the highest bidder, giving every book a positive review (with an affiliate link at the bottom, of course, or even becoming a full-fledged ecommerce company. News organizations, after all, are supposed to serve their readers, and if readers want a completely bought-and-paid-for news agenda, how long will it be until they get their wish?


Judging by the depressing reaction to the Bezos-owned Washington Post’s move to insert giant Amazon affiliate buttons into its news stories, that future might not be far off....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Paul Carr wrestles with Amazon links on the Washington Post book reviews page online. Valid concern, but here's my response:

"Paul, I understand your concern about journalistic integrity. In the digital age are links any different than print ads for a bookstore on the reviews page of a newspaper or the banner ad for Braintree at the top of your post? If it's transparent to readers, it seems legitimate here and in the Washington Post."

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How the Smartphone Ushered In a Golden Age of Journalism | WIRED

How the Smartphone Ushered In a Golden Age of Journalism | WIRED | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The smartphone promises a new golden age of journalism.


...Journalism, however, is holding its own. Statistics from the Times say roughly half of the people who read it now do so with their mobile devices, and that jibes with figures from the latest Pew report on the news media broadly. But if you were to assume that means people have given up reading actual articles and are just snacking instead, you'd be wrong. 


The Atlantic recently reported that a gorgeously illustrated 6,200-word story on BuzzFeed—which likewise gets about half its readers through mobile devices—not only received more than a million views, it held the attention of smartphone users for an average of more than 25 minutes. (WIRED's in-depth web offerings have also attracted audiences. A profile of a brilliant Mexican schoolgirl garnered 1.2 million views, 25 percent of them from phones, and readers spent an average of 18 minutes on it.)


Little wonder that for every fledgling enterprise like Circa, which generates slick digests of other people's journalism on the theory that that's what mobile readers want, you have formerly short-attention-span sites like BuzzFeed and Politico retooling themselves to offer serious, in-depth reporting. “Maybe we're entering into a new golden age of journalism,” venture capitalist Marc Andreessen mused in a recent blog post, “and we just haven't recognized it yet.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Here's a good read and some interesting reflections on mobile phones and the past and future for journalism .

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Reuters Institute 2014 Digital News Report

Reuters Institute 2014  Digital News Report | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The Reuters Institute Digital Report reveals new insights about digital news consumption based on a representative survey of online news consumers in the USA, UK, Germany, France, Denmark, Finland, Spain, Italy, Urban Brazil and Japan.


This year's report reveals new insights about digital news consumption based on a YouGov survey of over 18,000 online news consumers in the UK, US, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, Denmark and Finland.


This website contains data about the growth of tablets and smartphones, generational and country based differences in media usage. Also analysis on the role of impartial news in a digital world and the role of social media in finding and distributing news....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Valuable insight into digital news consumption and journalism trends.

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Annemarie Nier's curator insight, July 17, 2014 4:30 AM

This is the 2014 Reuters report for digital news consumption, based on a YouGov survey in ten countries.

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Overload! Journalism's battle for relevance in an age of too much information

Overload! Journalism's battle for relevance in an age of too much information | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...Chief among the findings was that many young consumers craved more in-depth news but were unable or unwilling to get it. “The abundance of news and ubiquity of choice do not necessarily translate into a better news environment for consumers,” concluded the researchers in their final report. “Participants in this study showed signs of news fatigue; that is, they appeared debilitated by information overload and unsatisfying news experiences .


 . . . Ultimately news fatigue brought many of the participants to a learned helplessness response. The more overwhelmed or unsatisfied they were, the less effort they were willing to put in.


”The idea that news consumers, even young ones, are overloaded should hardly come as a surprise. The information age is defined by output: we produce far more information than we can possibly manage, let alone absorb..

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Media's challenge to find new readers among the young.

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Journalism: Build the future | Columbia Journalism Review

Journalism: Build the future | Columbia Journalism Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

BYA decade ago, aspiring journalists could just think about journalism and leave the financial side to others. Now, to be a successful journalist you have to think like an entrepreneur and understand something about the business you’re in.


There have been some ups and downs, to say the least. In the early days, we had the lonely thrill of being “Web pioneers.” Back then, we developed some of the key forms and hallmarks of digital media: news aggregation, blogs, slideshows, the more personal, conversational tone of Web writing and headlines. In 1998, we were the first news site to try a paywall. In 1999, we were the first to get rid of one.


A land rush doesn’t mean serious journalism has turned into a great business. But talent and money flocking to our trade is preferable to a wholesale exodus....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

An optimistic look at the future of journalism Slate editor in chief Jacob Weisberg.

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AP will use robots to write some business stories | Poynter.

AP will use robots to write some business stories | Poynter. | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

AP will announce Monday that it plans to use automation technology from a company called Automated Insights to produce stories about earnings reports. The software means that “instead of providing 300 stories manually, we can provide up to 4,400 automatically for companies throughout the United States each quarter,” AP Managing Editor Lou Ferrara writes in a Q&A.


That does not mean job cuts or less coverage, Ferrara writes: “If anything, we are doubling down on the journalism we will do around earnings reports and business coverage.” 


Instead, he writes, “our journalists will focus on reporting and writing stories about what the numbers mean and what gets said in earnings calls on the day of the release, identifying trends and finding exclusive stories we can publish at the time of the earnings reports.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

WTH? Nano,nano! More is definitely less with this plan even if some sports stories have been done this way. Somehow, 4000 bad, formulaic stories will be better than 300 with context, insight, color, nuance? Pretzel logic indeed.

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