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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach <a href="<a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a>" rel="nofollow"><a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a></a>
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles (No Exaggeration) in 3 Years | NY Times

Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles (No Exaggeration) in 3 Years | NY Times | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...But then there’s Sarah Marquis, who perhaps should be seen as an explorer like Scott, born in the wrong age. She is 42 and Swiss, and has spent three of the past four years walking about 10,000 miles by herself, from Siberia through the Gobi Desert, China, Laos and Thailand, then taking a cargo boat to Brisbane, Australia, and walking across that continent.


Along the way, like Scott, she has starved, she has frozen, she has (wo)man-hauled. She has pushed herself at great physical cost to places she wanted to love but ended up feeling, as Scott wrote of the South Pole in his journal: “Great God! This is an awful place.” Despite planning a ludicrous trip, and dying on it, Scott became beloved and, somewhat improbably, hugely respected.


Marquis, meanwhile, can be confounding. “You tell people what you’re doing, and they say, ‘You’re crazy,’ ” Marquis told me. “It’s never: ‘Cool project, Sarah! Go for it.’ ” Perhaps this is because the territory Marquis explores is really internal — the nature of fear, the limits of stamina and self-reliance and the meaning of traveling in nature as a female human animal, alone....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Absolutely inspiring and a great story well told.

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Without a keyboard | Seth's Blog

Without a keyboard | Seth's Blog | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When the masses only connect to the net without a keyboard, who will be left to change the world?


It is possible but unlikely that someone will write a great novel on a tablet.


You can't create the spreadsheet that changes an industry on a smart phone.


And professional programmers don't sit down to do their programming with a swipe....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

A marvelous reminder from Seth Godin that it's not the tools, it's the creation that matters.

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The problem with too much information – Dougald Hine – Aeon

The problem with too much information – Dougald Hine – Aeon | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

This is more than just intellectual snobbery. Knowledge has a point when we start to find and make connections, to weave stories out of it, stories through which we make sense of the world and our place within it. It is the difference between memorising the bus timetable for a city you will never visit, and using that timetable to explore a city in which you have just arrived. When we follow the connections – when we allow the experience of knowing to take us somewhere, accepting the risk that we will be changed along the way – knowledge can give rise to meaning. And if there is an antidote to boredom, it is not information but meaning.


If boredom has become a sickness in modern societies, this is because the knack of finding meaning is harder to come by.


There is a connection, though, between the two. Information is perhaps the rawest material in the process out of which we arrive at meaning: an undifferentiated stream of sense and nonsense in which we go fishing for facts. But the journey from information to meaning involves more than simply filtering the signal from the noise. It is an alchemical transformation, always surprising. It takes skill, time and effort, practice and patience....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The internet promised to feed our minds with information. What have we learned? That our minds need more than that. Good reading with your coffee on a Saturday morning. 9/10

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, September 14, 2014 10:18 PM

This is so true. The analogy of having to memorise a bus timetable for a destination that you will never visit sums up the uselessness of information that we cannot use! Today, there is a surfeit of infomation, most of which is useless, and then we are under the constant pressure to process all this information. Filtering of the uselful from the useless often requires much effort. and to process large amounts of information requires skill. Unfortunately, the human brain has its limitations unlike the computer processor-you add up cores to it and it can multi-task! Life in the information age is perhaps the most significant stage in the history of mankind, and this is already shaping our future like no other age has done, not even the age of the Industrial Revolution!

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49 Botanical Marketing Examples

49 Botanical Marketing Examples | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

From retro juice cartons to floral fashion campaigns, these botanical marketing examples look to nature for inspiration. Drawing from the fashion world's recent obsession with botanical prints, this list of marketing strategies aims to influence consumers with the help of vivid visuals and transparent packaging designs.

Whether turning to vibrant floral imagery or focusing on a product's natural ingredients, reputable companies are choosing to affect their consumers with this bold and eye-catching branding concept. 

These botanical marketing examples include food and beverage packaging designs that are adorned with plant graphics along with fierce fashion campaigns that are lensed against floral backdrop vignettes....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

More creative with your coffee, inspiration and photography the Trend Hunter.

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The best TED talks for corporate communicators

The best TED talks for corporate communicators | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Those topics are among the nine TED talks corporate communicators should watch. The others discuss even more pertinent issues, like how to get engineers to cut back on jargon, and how your body language not only affects how others see you, but how you see yourself.Without further ado, here are the talks. Let us know if you have any to add to the list....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

If you want to know the secret behind employee engagement, how Disney writes unforgettable stories and whether texting is ruining English, watch these TED talks.

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How the Internet Saved Handmade Goods | Harvard Business Review

How the Internet Saved Handmade Goods | Harvard Business Review | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A recent article in The Economist, citing the work of Ryan Raffaelli at Harvard Business School, points to what it calls a “paradox” in the aftermath of disruptive innovation.


Some old technologies, after being rendered obsolete by better and cheaper alternatives (indeed even after whole industries based on them have been decimated), manage to “re-emerge” to the point that they sustain healthy businesses. Think mechanical Swiss watches, now enjoying strong sales. Or fountain pens, or vinyl records. Or small-batch, handmade goods — from vermouth to chocolate to pickles.


We could add our own favorite example: pinball. In our HBR article “Big Bang Disruption”, we describe the devastation of arcade pinball machines wrought in only a few years by Sony’s PlayStation home video console. From a historic high in 1993 of 130,000 machines sold, sales fell over 90% in the next five years. By the end of the decade, only one producer—Stern Pinball—was left making new machines, and with arcades closing daily, it looked as if it, too, would soon be facing game over....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The Internet. The same technologies that destroyed them brought them back.

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OXY GREY's curator insight, September 1, 2014 4:25 AM

Quand Internet réinvente ce qu'il avait annihilé il y a quelques années ou comment Internet a relancé l'industrie artisanale du "fait-main"

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The Boy Who Invented Email -- History of Email (Part 1)

The Boy Who Invented Email -- History of Email (Part 1) | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In 1978, a 14-year-old boy invented email.He created a computer program, which he called "email," that replicated all the functions of the interoffice mail system: Inbox, Outbox, Folders, Memo, Attachments, Address Book, etc., the now familiar parts of every email system.


On August 30, 1982, the US government officially recognized V.A. Shiva Ayyadurai as the inventor of email by awarding him the first US Copyright for "Email," "Computer Program for Electronic Mail System," for his 1978 invention. This was awarded at a time when Copyright was the only way to protect software inventions.


Email, however, emerged from somewhat unlikely circumstances. Email wasn't created, with a massive research budget, in big institutions like the ARPANET, MIT or the military. Such institutions had thought it "impossible" to create such a system, believing it far too complex.Email was created in the heart of inner city Newark, NJ, at a relatively small institution, with little to no funding.


Shiva was given something that big institutions, however, may have found hard to provide: an ecosystem of loving parents, a wonderful mentor, dedicated teachers and a collegial environment where he was treated as an equal though his colleagues were 20 to 40 years older.In that ecosystem, Shiva thrived, and the world got email!...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Really enjoyable storytelling and long weekend reading.

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Intelligent Algorithm Made Discovery That Slipped Past Art Historians For Years | The Creators Project

Intelligent Algorithm Made Discovery That Slipped Past Art Historians For Years | The Creators Project | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A recent project used nuanced imaging technology and classification systems to robotize the process of understanding how famous artists have influenced one another.


Could a computer program influence how we understand art history and the canon? Or, could an artificially intelligent algorithm do the work of art experts for them? A recent researcher project doesn't quite suggest such a reality, but it does demonstrate that machines can highlight subtleties within arts and culture that humans have previously never noticed.In a paper titled "Toward Automated Discovery Of Artistic Influence" by Babak Saleh and a team of computer science researchers at Rutgers, the academics explained how they used nuanced imaging technology and classification systems to robotize the process of understanding how famous artists have influenced and inspired one another.


For their research, the team chose 1,700 paintings by 66 artists, covering the 15th to the late 20th century. Using a technique that analyzes visual concepts called "classemes"—wherein objects, color shades, subjects' movement, and more are marked—the researchers created a list of 3,000 classemes for each painting, data which The Physics arXiv Blog compares to a vector. Then, they used an artificially intelligent algorithm to evaluate the vectors and look for similarities or overlapping qualities among the 1,700 paintings. ArXiv adds, "To create a ground truth against which to measure their results, they also collate expert opinions on which these artists have influenced the others."...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Fascinating application of technology to art and creativity. Good read. 9/10

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Want to Go Viral? It’ll Take a Lot More Work Than You Think | WIRED

Want to Go Viral? It’ll Take a Lot More Work Than You Think | WIRED | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

After years of trying, I became an "overnight success." See the contradiction here?


“It’s expensive to be poor.” I heard the last words of my interview with CNN’s Don Lemon as if someone else were speaking them. July 9, 2014 was my 32nd birthday. I was supposed to be out with friends, having secured the rare babysitter for my twins. Instead, I was on national television.It wasn’t right; it wasn’t me. I was the mommy blogger, scraping by, who sometimes did funny things that garnered a few thousand hits to my blog or Facebook page. But the calls kept coming: NPR, Al Jazeera, CNN again, Sirius XM, UpWorthy, TIME Magazine. Now I had television and literary agents calling me. People were thinking this thing was worth money.


When my essay about driving to a food bank in my husband’s Mercedes went viral, people immediately started heralding me as an “overnight success.” It was true in its way. The success itself was overnight. What people don’t realize though is that the luck of going viral was based on a mountain of hard work, on years of effort. There’s a frustrating truth to success in the Internet age: in order for your work to reach an audience, someone with power has to give it a chance, and in order for someone in power to give it a chance, it has to have an audience....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

"Instant success" arrived after 5 years of hard work for former TV producer Darlena Cunha. Inspiration for those who sometimes are ready to give up.

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19 Visual Social Media Secrets from the Pros [SlideShare]

19 Visual Social Media Secrets from the Pros [SlideShare] | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Is your brand telling visual stories?  Are you empowering your fans to create and share visual content for you?


Brands who create and curate visual content are seeing wider reach, more shares and traffic to their real or virtual doorstep.


We asked 19 Visual Social Media Experts to give us their Top Visual Content Secrets - here is what they shared with us (featuring a cool SlideShare)....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is recommended reading for bloggers, marketers, PR and content marketing pros.  10/10

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Hsin-Ju Tsai's curator insight, August 16, 2014 8:46 AM

Visual social media is getting popular these days. Many blogger love to share a short video to tell story. The main point for visual social media is to make sure video is suitable for platform and followers are able to share it. @Ashleigh Ali

Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 16, 2014 8:05 PM

A must-read and excellent resource. Highly recommended 10/10.

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10 Web Design Blogs You Should Be Reading

10 Web Design Blogs You Should Be Reading | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

We all need inspiration at one point or another. Whether it's Monday morning or Friday afternoon, sometimes we need to kickstart our creative juices. With that said, we're here to help!


Our web design team has picked some of their favorite blogs for education, inspiration, and procrastination. Are we missing any of your favorites? Hit us up on Twitter. Without further ado...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Useful list of the best web design blogs for creatives, designers and developers to follow.

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This column will change your life: how to think about writing

This column will change your life: how to think about writing | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The key thing to realise, Pinker argues, is that writing is "cognitively unnatural." For almost all human existence, nobody wrote anything; even after that, for millennia, only a tiny elite did so. And it remains an odd way to communicate. You can't see your readers' facial expressions. They can't ask for clarification. Often, you don't know who they are, or how much they know. How to make up for all this?


Pinker's answer builds on the work of two language scholars, Mark Turner and Francis-Noël Thomas, who label their approach "joint attention". Writing is a modern twist on an ancient, species-wide behaviour: drawing someone else's attention to something visible. 

Jeff Domansky's insight:

'The idea is to help readers discern something you know they'd be able to see, if only they were looking in the right place,' says Oliver Burkeman...

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The 3-Step Journey of a Remarkable Piece of Content - Copyblogger

The 3-Step Journey of a Remarkable Piece of Content - Copyblogger | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

We’ve all experienced content like this. But do we know how to create it? That’s the question. Because consistently creating remarkable content over time is what it’s all about.


You’re aiming to create content that makes people pay attention, think, and feel.


I believe that remarkable content takes a three-step journey.

And as content creators, if we keep this journey in mind, we can craft an experience that will have a profound effect on our readers.


Jeff Domansky's insight:

Remarkable content takes a three-step journey to inspiration says Pamela Wilson.

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Tom George's curator insight, June 5, 2014 10:05 AM

Always great copy and content marketing tips from Copyblogger.

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Wisdom in the Age of Information and the Importance of Storytelling in Making Sense of the World: An Animated Essay

Wisdom in the Age of Information and the Importance of Storytelling in Making Sense of the World: An Animated Essay | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

For my part in the 2014 Future of Storytelling Summit, I had the pleasure of collaborating with animator Drew Christie — the talent behind that wonderful short film about Mark Twain and the myth of originality — on an animated essay that I wrote and narrated, exploring a subject close to my heart and mind: the question of how we can cultivate true wisdom in the age of information and why great storytellers matter more than ever in helping us make sense of an increasingly complex world. It comes as an organic extension of the seven most important life-learnings from the first seven years of Brain Pickings. Full essay text below — please enjoy.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Maria Popova offers her thoughts on navigating the open sea of knowledge after seven years of Brain Pickings. She accompanies her essay with. an interesting animated video worth viewing. 9/10

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Millennials are out-reading older generations | Quartz

Millennials are out-reading older generations | Quartz | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Kids today with their selfies and their Snapchats and their love of literature.


Millennials, like each generation that was young before them, tend to attract all kinds of ire from their elders for being superficial, self-obsessed, anti-intellectuals. But a study out today from the Pew Research Center offers some vindication for the younger set. Millennials are reading more books than the over-30 crowd, Pew found in a survey of more than 6,000 Americans. 


Some 88% of Americans younger than 30 said they read a book in the past year compared with 79% of those older than 30. At the same time, American readers’ relationship with public libraries is changing—with younger readers less likely to see public libraries as essential in their communities....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Yes, if you can trust the research and the interpretation, Millennials are reading more than the previous generation. Now, if we only knew what they were reading. ;-)

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Meet the World’s 16-Year-Old PowerPoint Champs

Meet the World’s 16-Year-Old PowerPoint Champs | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Most 16-year-olds are focused on sports or cars or maybe even the SATs. For Tyler Millis and Arjit Kansal, two teens from Fort Meyers, Florida and New Delhi, India, respectively, their passion is PowerPoint. Yep, you read that right: PowerPoint.


The two 16-year-olds beat out 400,000 candidates from 130 countries to be named Microsoft Office Specialist World Champions— Millis in PowerPoint 2007, and Kansal in PowerPoint 2010. The 13th annual competition, sponsored by Certiport, holds a series of tests and interviews for students to show off their knowledge of Microsoft Office products. Only 123 students made it to the final round, with Millis and Kansal taking home the PowerPoint titles and $5,000 scholarships....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Several good tips, but mostly a good story about determination and content.

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Think Big, but Speak Simply About This | Lisa Pool

Think Big, but Speak Simply About This | Lisa Pool | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Think Nike: just do it. Think Apple: Hello. Think EA Games: Challenge Everything.


If your campaign speak keeps going and going and going like the Energizer Bunny, you may wear people out before they catch up with your this. Make it simple. Get on your Harley-Davidson until you can define your world in a whole new way.


Thinking big about speaking simply is power.


Complexity is difficult. Complexity will drown in the noise.If you can’t speak simply about whatever this is, take a step back, think bigger about simplicity. Do something different with this. Look at the heart and soul of this. Simple will rise above the noise.


Think Big. Speak Simply.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lisa Pool reminds marketers of the most important element in marketing and communication. Simplicity.

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Platform Thinking: The Future of Work

Platform Thinking: The Future of Work | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...This is the formula for building a business: You figure out how you are creating value. You identify a set of operations that repeatedly create value. You figure out a way to efficiently conduct these operations repeatedly.

There are three broad ways that businesses conduct these operations repeatedly and get things done:

  1. Get employees to do the work.
  2. Get algorithms to do the work.
  3. Get users to do the work.

Let’s think through the problem of navigating the web for the most relevant information of the day. Three companies try to solve this in three very different ways:

  1. Yahoo: A bunch of editors decide the best content for the day.
  2. Google News: Algorithms decide the top news of the day.
  3. Twitter: Users’ tweets and retweets decide the top news of the day.

For those of us who read the earlier article on the three broad models for problem-solving, here’s the interesting part. These three approaches correspond exactly with the three models for problem solving....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Superb post on business foundations and platforms from Sangeet Paul Choudary. Highly recommended 9.5/10.

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The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine

The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...In the altogether illuminating 1994 volume The Psychology of Writing (public library), cognitive psychologist Roland T. Kellogg explores how work schedules, behavioral rituals, and writing environments affect the amount of time invested in trying to write and the degree to which that time is spent in a state of boredom, anxiety, or creative flow.


Kellogg writes:

"[There is] evidence that environments, schedules, and rituals restructure the writing process and amplify performance… The principles of memory retrieval suggest that certain practices should amplify performance. These practices encourage a state of flow rather than one of anxiety or boredom. Like strategies, these other aspects of a writer’s method may alleviate the difficulty of attentional overload. The room, time of day, or ritual selected for working may enable or even induce intense concentration or a favorable motivational or emotional state. Moreover, in accordance with encoding specificity, each of these aspects of method may trigger retrieval of ideas, facts, plans, and other relevant knowledge associated with the place, time, or frame of mind selected by the writer for work."...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Looking in behind the science and psychology of writing in this interesting essay from Maria Popova of Brain Pickings.

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Benjamin Labarthe-Piol's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:58 AM

great

Manya Arond-Thomas's curator insight, September 1, 2014 1:04 PM

The trick is knowing your optimal environments, rituals, etc. that enhance and amplify your ability to write.  For example, it was only in 2013 that I realized that I actually write more easily in public environments (like cafes) where I can be anonymous, but still in the energy field of others.

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Ten ways communication is changingchanging | Dazed Digital

Charting the rise of tech-infested communications – from pheromone parties to Narbs


Public scrutiny has tunneled hard on the shallowness of contemporary communication, as depicted in Nicholas Carr’s aptly-named 2010 book The Shallows. Carr writes passionately about humanity’s dwindling attention span, and rightly so – the internet has changed the way we handle information, and the gap between generations, especially regarding activities we deem “social” and entertaining, is only growing more pronounced.


Perhaps because of the mind-numbing nature of pop culture’s online lingua franca – memes – general consensus seems to indicate that the internet has had a detrimental effect on our attention spans. This is thanks to mechanical factors like hyperlinks, gifs, embedded video content, and other pretty things that help to add flavor and aesthetics to what would otherwise be a dry information dump. It's no longer sufficient to convey a message – the message has now become inextricably linked to the medium so much that the latter now obscures the former.


Through no fault of their own, the Carrs of the world don’t address the the bold, unrefined new forms of communication that evade categorisation: superdialects, extrasensory communication, and straight-up biotech developments that push our cognitive and linguistic potential into the realm of science fiction. Yes, it sucks that the printed word is threatened by the new frontier of interactive media, but in an ideal world, the two don’t need to be mutually exclusive realms.


Technology has simply expanded the tools we have at our disposal, and frankly, we’re all for modular means of everyday communication that allow for nonsense and idiocy. Let's take a look at ten communication trends on the horizon...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Stimulating reading and exploration of ideas. Highly recommended 10/10

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The written word

The written word | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

OK so I know that there's YouTube and podcasting but most of the Internet's power is still in the written word. It is text that conveys most of the important ideas and it is accessible at almost zero cost to all of us.


...We need to start small, to take baby steps. Even the practise of keeping a paper journal is immensely powerful. We often don't know what we think until we write it down. Jotting down ideas and impressions gets us in the habit of thinking about what we think and better at expressing it. As we get more confident we can share some of our insights online. Whether by blogging or updating Facebook we can put things out there, see what reactions we get, learn from the responses. Rinse and repeat....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Word up! Euan Semple reminds us of the importance of words at The Obvious.

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40 Creative Ads That Will Inspire You

40 Creative Ads That Will Inspire You | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Advertising is often very difficult, but fortunately there are many different strategies to creating the perfect ad. In the age of image-based social media and infographics, many businesses are focusing their ads around a single large image meant to draw viewers in. Others are taking a slightly modified approach to traditional advertising. Instead of telling consumers why they need a product, they’re showing them.


Some businesses are literally turning the world upside-down with their ads. These ads encourage people to reflect on the world around them, so it will stick with them long after they see it. Here are 40 of the most creative advertisements out there. Hopefully these will inspire you to launch your own perfect ad campaign...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

40 very creative ads to inspire your inner creative.

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Marlboro Boy And Fat Ronald: The Brand-Jamming Art Of Ron English

Marlboro Boy And Fat Ronald: The Brand-Jamming Art Of Ron English | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Portland artist Ron English has spent his career lampooning some of America's top brands, and he's got the cease-and-desist letters to prove it. Undeterred, English and Last Gasp Publishing have compiled his greatest hits in Status Factory. The picture book includes photorealistic oil paintings that mock such marketing icons as Marlboro Man (as a cigarette-puffing 10-year old), Mickey Mouse (in a gas mask) and Ronald McDonald (50 pounds overweight).

To elaborate on the thinking behind the candy-colored satires showcased in the gallery above, English talks to Co.Create about "reverse shoplifting," the perverse magic of saucer-eyed hucksters, truth in advertising, and how he uses diorama to make art from a kid's point of view....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Now that's a national lampoon! Props to artist Ron English 

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Here's What Steve Jobs Did When An Employee Told Him The Apple Store's Layout Was All Wrong

Here's What Steve Jobs Did When An Employee Told Him The Apple Store's Layout Was All Wrong | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

"Do you know how big a change that is?" he recalls Jobs saying. "I don’t have time to redesign the store."


It seemed like that was that, but 10 minutes later when the pair walked into the meeting, Jobs immediately spoke up.


"Well, Ron thinks our store is all wrong," Jobs said. "And he’s right, so I’m going to leave now. And Ron, you work with the team and design the store."


Even though it would take longer to open the store because of the redesign, Jobs knew that it was worth taking the extra time to get it right. 


"It’s not about speed to market," Johnson says. "It’s really about doing your level best."...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The genius of Steve Jobs and whyhe was brilliant! Must-read 10/10

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Do These 3 Things Before Bed To Hack Your Creativity While You Sleep

Do These 3 Things Before Bed To Hack Your Creativity While You Sleep | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
What you do right before sleep could mean a breakthrough in the morning.


Imagine hacking into your own brain while you sleep, finding unrelated details or ideas that were never connected and mashing them up to get a solution to whatever problem has been wracking your brain. It can and has been done.


What you do before bed can play a role in how primed your brain is for this kind of creativity. Research has repeatedly found that sleep improves people's ability to come up with creative solutions to problems. Psychologists from UC San Diego found that REM sleep improves the creative process more than any other state--asleep or awake. And often the solutions to problems come to us when we are sleeping because of a phenomenon cognitive scientists call "pattern recognition."...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

No excuses. Get creative! Use a book, a question and lucid dreaming.

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