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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
PR insight, social media & thought leadership - from The PR Coach http://www.theprcoach.com
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The De-Watergating of American Journalism | Gawker

The De-Watergating of American Journalism | Gawker | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein's investigation into the origins of the Watergate break-in—which took place 40 years ago yesterday—is one of the most highly mythologized episodes in the history of journalism.

 

It represents the Platonic ideal of what journalism-with-a-capital-J ought to be, at least according to its high priesthood—sober, careful young men doggedly following the story wherever it leads and holding power to account, without fear or favor. It was also a sloppy, ethically dubious project the details of which would mortify any of the smug high priests of journalism that flourished in its wake. The actual Watergate investigation could never have survived the legacy it helped create....

 

[Great read, highly recommended - JD]

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Advancing the Story » Social TV may mean money and more loyal viewers for news

Advancing the Story » Social TV may mean money and more loyal viewers for news | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Forget buzz – the noise surrounding social TV is ear-splitting. In fact, it’s tough to find a publication dealing with media trends that’s not talking about various efforts to leverage social media and television viewing.


But where are all the journalists in this discussion? Well, more than 200 local TV news stations are banking on ConnecTV to get their social TV conversation ramped up.


ConnecTV is a single “second-screen app” that allows the user to interact with hundreds of programs – syndicated shows, prime-time fare and live programming, such as sporting events and newscasts.


According to a story by Cory Bergman at LostRemote, “If you’re watching a local newscast, [ConnecTV] ties into partner stations’ iNews and ENPS computer systems, offering content and conversations synced exactly with the broadcast. In one example, ConnecTV plans to allow users (in some markets) to share their favorite stories from the app to Facebook and Twitter, which will then link the station’s video player with the exact clip cued up. Stations’ social accounts will also appear in the ConnecTV experience.”...

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Why the World's Most Perfect News Tweet Is Kind of Boring | the Atlantic

Why the World's Most Perfect News Tweet Is Kind of Boring | the Atlantic | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Researchers have found a way to predict a tweet's popularity -- with an astounding 84 percent accuracy.

 

Here, per one algorithm, could be the Platonic version of the news tweet:

The New York Times

@nytimes
Bits Blog: Apple Buddies Up With Cheaper Wireless Partners for iPhone nyti.ms/LcLviE
8 Jun 12 ReplyRetweetFavorite

 

If that seems a little dull for Twitter Perfection ... well, that's the point. Steadiness -- compelling news expressed in straightforward, not hyperbolic, language -- is actually a component of maximally shareable content, the algorithm suggests. And this particular tweet is also sent from a credible source, The New York Times, which makes it extra-spreadable. It's about technology, the most popular, shareable category of news story. It's engaging without being insistent. And it stars a company -- Apple -- with high name recognition....

 

[This is a fascinating read - JD]

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Survey: Fox most uncivil, PBS most civil news organization | Poynter.

Survey: Fox most uncivil, PBS most civil news organization | Poynter. | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

An online survey of 1,000 U.S. adults conducted in April found that 62 percent consider the media uncivil....

 

Cable channels were viewed as more uncivil than broadcast networks, and PBS was considered most civil....

 

Slightly less than one-half are avoiding op-eds and editorials (49%) and news coverage and reporting (45%) this year. Interestingly, the tune out rate this year is significantly lower than it was last year for politics (58% vs. 67%, respectively), government (55% vs. 62%) and news coverage and reporting (45% vs. 55%)....

 

[Media vivility? Now there's an oxymoron - JD]

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ABC News applies two years of use to new iPad strategy | paidContent

ABC News applies two years of use to new iPad strategy | paidContent | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The distinctive three-dimensional globe is giving way to a new three-edition iPad app strategy for ABC News.

 

The new version, going live as this is published, relies not on ideas about what iPad users might want — as was the case when it first launched in July 2010 — but on nearly two years of usage.

“The globe served a wonderful purpose for us for a long time but because we were so early in we have a lot of knowledge,” Joe Ruffolo, SVP, ABC News Digital, told me as they were preparing to launch....

 

[iPad as second TV; Interesting trend - JD]

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The rise of citizen journalism | Guardian

The rise of citizen journalism | Guardian | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
From live blogs on 'Occupy' protests to footage of Syrian atrocities on YouTube, filmmakers now have access to a wealth of raw material – but can it all be trusted?

 

In a digital world with a whole host of different ways to communicate a factual message it is increasingly hard to judge the value of amateur eyewitness film shot on a mobile phone and posted on the internet against a considered, observational documentary broadcast on a traditional television channel....

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Why traditional media should be afraid of Twitter | GigaOm

Why traditional media should be afraid of Twitter | GigaOm | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Twitter's hiring of editorial staff to curate real-time information around news events through "hashtag pages" may not be a direct competitor for media companies, but the areas of overlap are growing -- and so is its attractiveness to advertisers.

 

It has already become a real-time newswire for many, a source of breaking news and commentary on live events, and now — with the launch of curated “hashtag pages” like the one it launched late last week for a NASCAR event — it is showing signs of becoming a full-fledged editorial operation. It may not be hiring investigative reporters, but the areas of overlap between what it does and what media companies do is growing, and so is its attractiveness to the advertisers that media entities desperately need to hang onto....

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“Why’s this so good?” No. 44: Robert Kurson and the blind man – Nieman Storyboard

“Why’s this so good?” No. 44: Robert Kurson and the blind man – Nieman Storyboard | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

My love affair with narrative nonfiction was in its early stages when I first read Robert Kurson’s “Into the Light,” in the June 2005 edition of Esquire. I was mostly clueless about the art of plotting as a way to transport and transform the reader, but when Kurson’s story pulled my emotions in opposite directions, I began to understand the particular power of building tension by changing course. Reading “Into the Light” is like having a deep and tormenting debate with a friend over drinks about the meaning of life and the cost of change....

 

[Storytelling so good! JD]

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Inside Forbes: In Journalism, What's New Is Actually Old... and 'That's the Way It Is' - Forbes

Inside Forbes: In Journalism, What's New Is Actually Old... and 'That's the Way It Is' - Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Time's first issue, in 1923, featured Speaker of the House Joseph G. Cannon. Founder Henry Luce ushered in the era of aggregation nearly 90 years before the digital version.

 

...For me, the larger point has always been this: there’s rarely anything new in journalism that some great editor or journalist hasn’t already thought about, tried, or succeeded at before. Today, the real trick is applying yesterday’s smart ideas to the technologies now disrupting the industry. In the case of T/S and now FORBES, building a dynamic contributor page that does the job is not as simple as it may sound....

 

[Interesting historical take on journalism, technology and change - JD]

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Local TV Stations Cut Costs by Sharing News Operations | New York Times

Local TV Stations Cut Costs by Sharing News Operations | New York Times | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Agreements in which local TV stations share news operations are seen by the stations as a survival strategy, and by critics as a barrier to competition.

 

Call a reporter at the CBS television station here, and it might be an anchor for the NBC station who calls back. Or it might be the news director who runs both stations’ news operations.

The stations here compete for viewers, but they cooperate in gathering the news — maintaining technically separate ownership, but sharing office space, news video and even the scripts written for their nightly news anchors. That is why viewers see the same segments on car accidents, the same interviews with local politicians, the same high school sports highlights....

 

[But is it good for journalism and communities? JD]

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Meograph: New Tool For Four-Dimensional Storytelling - 10,000 Words

Meograph: New Tool For Four-Dimensional Storytelling - 10,000 Words | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A yet-to-be-launched tool called Meograph promises to let you easily “create, playback and share beautiful stories in the context of when and where.” It’s a tool that’s still in pre-beta, but journalists and news organizations can get priority access for an invite.

 

Meograph released a demo of what the tool can do, using the fictional KVWM San Diego TV station as an example use case. Based on the examples, I wouldn’t yet call the resulting product “beautiful,” but the storytelling format is a compelling mishmash: timeline + audio + Google Maps + images + video+ hyperlinks (for adding more context and linking to stories)....

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Andy Carvin on Twitter as a newsroom and being human

Andy Carvin on Twitter as a newsroom and being human | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In a discussion about his use of Twitter as a reporting tool, NPR strategist Andy Carvin made some interesting points about the value of crowdsourced journalism -- including the importance of being transparent about the process, and the virtues of being human....

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NPR creates news applications team as part of strategy for ‘multimedia audio’ | Poynter.

NPR announced to staff Monday that it is creating a team to build news applications and has hired the Chicago Tribune’s Brian Boyer to lead it.

 

The announcement represents a big bet on news applications, not just because of the team’s size – seven people, including Boyer – but because it comes just a few days after The Washington Post reported that NPR is running a $2.6 million deficit halfway through its fiscal year....

 

NPR staff have done some of this type of work already, such as a presentation showing the growth of natural gas drilling in Pennsylvania. “What I’m hoping is that, by taking these positions and putting them together as a team, we’ll be able to do a higher level of [work] than we’ve been able to do with scattered design, database and development resources,” Stencel said by phone....

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Why Newspapers Were Doomed All Along | HBR

Why Newspapers Were Doomed All Along | HBR | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...We are seeing, as Jack Shafer and others have pointed out, a death spiral in which newspapers react to their loss of readers by cutting back on their news-gathering resources and raising prices, thus making themselves even less attractive to readers. Yes, Warren Buffett has recently bucked the trend with his purchase of the Media General chain. But I doubt he's reversed it. And I'm not sure it ever could have been reversed. Dealing with disruptive innovation is difficult at any time, in any industry. But the business models of metropolitan daily newspapers in the U.S. pretty much set them up for failure once the Internet arrived. And even if they'd succeeded, their news operations would be endangered anyway....

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Advancing the Story » Twitter’s advantages over Facebook for journalists

...Writing in Advertising Age, B.L. Ochman lists 10 reasons why Twitter is a better branding vehicle than Facebook. Several points she makes are useful for journalists to consider as well.


“The more you give, the more you get.” Ochman suggests you follow the 12:1 rule — add value and help others 12 times, promote yourself once.


That flies in the face of most news outlets’ Twitter feeds, which are often little more than headlines services....

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Do campaign gaffes matter? Not to voters | CJR

Do campaign gaffes matter? Not to voters | CJR | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Overhyped gaffe coverage is a sign that editors should shift resources to other stories...

 

Since Friday, the national political conversation has been dominated by a debate over the importance of President Obama’s statement, at a White House press conference, that “The private sector is doing fine.”

 

Unfortunately, most of the media discussion has focused on strategy rather than policy....

 

These claims are representative of the way journalists routinely promote the importance of these sorts of pseudo-controversies, even though there is little convincing evidence that gaffes affect presidential election outcomes. The problem is particularly acute during the summer doldrums between the end of the primary campaigns and the party conventions. As we’ve seen, a bored press corps with space to fill can easily lose perspective....

 

[Really interesting read with possible PR, crisis implications when you think about it - JD]

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Romney boots reporters from Newseum event, media critics debate nature of irony | Poynter.

Mitt Romney’s campaign kicked reporters out of an event at Washington, D.C.’s Newseum on Wednesday night. Huffington Post media reporter Michael Calderone’s tweet about the news stresses its irony...

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Inside Forbes: The 9 Realities of Building a Sustainable Model for Journalism - Forbes

Inside Forbes: The 9 Realities of Building a Sustainable Model for Journalism - Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

I set out as an entrepreneur four years ago to change the world of journalism and build a digital business. I had a few decades in the news industry, one of them in new media, to guide me. During my journey, I’ve kept two quotes locked in my mind.

This one, from Don Logan, the former CEO of Time Inc., in response to how much he spent building the ill-fated Pathfinder Web site: “It’s given new meaning to me of the scientific term black hole.” The other was from Jeff Zucker, NBC Universal’s former CEO. In talking about digital video, he said: “Our challenge with all these ventures is to effectively monetize them so that we do not end up trading analog dollars for digital pennies.”

 

[Lewis DVorkin offers terrific insight into the search for a sustainable business model for journalism - JD]

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Local news crisis: let's turn universities into community broadcasters

Local news crisis: let's turn universities into community broadcasters | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Roy Greenslade: In this extract from What do we mean by local?

 

The communications landscape has changed forever. While local news provision has declined, the way people get their news – whether national or local – has significantly changed, which is why Jeremy Hunt's dream of a national local television network doesn't quite add up.

 

Why go down a traditional route to deliver a local news service through local television when there are a multitude of ways to serve the needs of the audience and when there is a new generation of digitally-savvy people who can find new ways of interacting with communities at a low cost?...

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Don't Mean To Be Alarmist, But The TV Business May Be Starting To Collapse | Business Insider

Don't Mean To Be Alarmist, But The TV Business May Be Starting To Collapse | Business Insider | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The question is... how fast?...

 

...In other words, newspapers were screwed. It just took a while for changing user behavior to really hammer the business. 


The same is almost certainly true for television.


In our household, as in many households, television consumption has changed massively over the past decade, especially over the past 5 years....

 

[Provocative, indepth look at whirlwind changes in TV - JD]

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The Future of Content is Code

The Future of Content is Code | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Apps and visual content make better use of the Internet's capabilities, so not surprisingly content creators must begin to expand expertise.

 

For a window into the future of content, look no further than the industry that creates more content than any other — journalism. The emerging opportunities in journalism lie in programming, not writing, as can be seen from the number of job postings.

 

User demand is for apps, in addition to stories, videos, infographics and slideshows. Who are these journo-programmers, and what can they tell us about staying relevant in the content industry?...

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LA Times reporter starts archive of news site front pages | Journalism.co.uk

LA Times reporter starts archive of news site front pages | Journalism.co.uk | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Los Angeles Times journalist Ben Welsh's project to capture the front pages of selected news websites on the hour, each hour, has already hit its $5K goal on crowdfunding website Kickstarter...

 

A hacker-journalist from the Los Angeles Times has started an online project to capture the front pages of news websites on the hour, every hour, in a bid to archive news website homepages for future generations.

 

PastPages, which was launched by Ben Welsh earlier this month, takes an image snapshot of the world’s biggest news sites every hour and makes them available as an archive....

 

[Interesting site; view it here: http://www.pastpages.org/ JD]

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Amid Tweets and Slide Shows, the Longform Still Thrives

Amid Tweets and Slide Shows, the Longform Still Thrives | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In the age of 140-character tweets, aggregated blog posts and throwaway slide shows, common sense says you can’t expect the Web generation’s ADD-addled minds to spend more than a few minutes with any sort of content. (They’ve even created their own acronym—“tl;dr,” or “too long; didn’t read”—to justify their disdain for anything longer than three paragraphs.) Yet somehow we’ve found ourselves in a golden age of longform journalism, with everyone from old-school print magazines to digital outlets producing extended articles. And people are actually reading them. So what gives?


One answer: social recommendation....

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Times-Picayune Eliminates Daily Frequency

Times-Picayune Eliminates Daily Frequency | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The New Orleans Times-Picayune, a fixture in the Big Easy since 1837, will slash its staff and production schedule, going from 7 to 3 days a week beginning...

 

[Another large city will no longer have a daily newspaper. Ironically, the NewspaperDeathWatch.com website is thriving - JD]

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Rory O’Connor: Traditional media companies cling to their brands at their peril

Rory O’Connor: Traditional media companies cling to their brands at their peril | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
What's in a name? Not enough to guarantee you'll survive this messy media revolution, author Rory O'Connor says in his new book.

 

“If everybody’s a brand then arguably nothing is brand.”

 

That’s journalist and author Rory O’Connor’s nice way of telling big, traditional media companies that clinging to the power of their brands isn’t necessarily going to keep them afloat. As the lines between big brands, microbrands and personal brands keep blurring, O’Connor says expectations about brand value are changing....

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