Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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NY Times’ Jim Roberts: ‘The Pace Of Change Gets Faster And Faster’

NY Times’ Jim Roberts: ‘The Pace Of Change Gets Faster And Faster’ | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

What’s the most dramatic change you’ve seen in your 25 years at the Times?

 

I definitely think the transition to digital — it’s enormous, it’s ongoing. Change is hard. Dealing with disruptive technologies left and right requires a lot of energy, a lot of imagination. And every institution like ours deals with it. Just as we’ve mastered the Web, we then are faced with a completely new environment in which people are getting information on their phones. Tablets are now creating their own different types of use cases and consumption. Social media came out of nowhere. If you and I had this conversation four years ago, we wouldn’t be talking about Twitter. Maybe we’d be talking about smart phones, but we wouldn’t talking about tablets. The pace of change gets faster and faster. The disruptions come more quickly. So it’s tough, but it’s been also really gratifying to watch an institution that’s big and based in tradition. It’s been gratifying to be part of the adaptation process.

 

Social remains a challenge, in a lot of ways. I don’t even know how to describe social. It’s a way of life. It’s more than software. But it’s evolving everyday. People are getting information through it everyday. It’s incredibly flexible. It means we have to be incredibly flexible to keep up. That’s going to remain a challenge. Everything mobile remains a challenge for us. I see traffic patterns and how our audience, they’re not abandoning our website, but they’re spending more and more time on smartphones and tablets. And the other challenge for us is video. I want us to get better at video. We’ve got to master live coverage, and be able to do it in a more nimble fashion....

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The newsonomics of leapfrog news video | Nieman Lab

The newsonomics of leapfrog news video | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Do newspapers have a shot at stepping ahead of their broadcast rivals as web video evolves?

 

Our political conventions remind us that this is not the summer of love. But it may be the season we’ll remember as the summer of video.

 

Certainly, video’s — news video’s — growth has been noteworthy for awhile. But now there’s a bursting of new news video forms, a hothouse of experimentation that is both refreshing and intriguing. The blossoming has implications far and wide, not just for “news,” but for tech companies like Facebook and television brands from Ellen to Piers to The View. Within it, we see the capability of non-TV companies to leapfrog the TV people.

 

Just Monday, both The Wall Street Journal (“The Wall Street Journal wants its reporters filing microvideo updates for its new WorldStream”) and The New York Times made video announcements. A couple of weeks ago, the ambitious Huffington Post Live launched, hiring the almost unbelievable number of 104 staffers. In these three forays, and in the thinking in and around them, we see the boundaries of old media being slowly broken. We’re on the edge, finally, of new ways to both create and present news — and how to talk about the news....

 

[Trend for PR to follow closely - JD]

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No, Feedgen, I Won’t Publish the Article You Wrote About Yourself Under My Byline

No, Feedgen, I Won’t Publish the Article You Wrote About Yourself Under My Byline | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Oh my God, this is getting out of control.

 

The last six years of blogging has led to a lot of great things, but it has led to a lot of awful things as well. The worst: The pressure of speed and volume has lead to otherwise smart writers spending their days rewriting press releases. The coverage of the Facebook S1 was dominated by people cutting and pasting parts of a public document into WordPress and then publishing as quickly as the could.

 

That was bad enough. But hey, at least rewriting involves some typing, right?

 

Emboldened by their ability to get whatever they wanted on blogs, PR people then started producing and sending demo videos to reporters. Rather than a reporter having to actually use a product and write their own review of how it works, they’d just embed what is essentially a commercial paid for and produced by the company. It’s a lot easier to make it look like you have an intuitive UI when the person who built it is showing you how it works....

 

[Sometimes PR still sucks and journalism still blows - JD]

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Hijacking the news: how hackers are manipulating the press from the inside out

Hijacking the news: how hackers are manipulating the press from the inside out | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In May of last year, PBS reported online that "prominent rapper Tupac has been found alive and well in a small resort in New Zealand." The U.K.-based The Sun devoted its front page in July to a report that media mogul Rupert Murdoch had died from a suicidal drug overdose. The same month, Fox News Politics tweeted that President Barack Obama had been assassinated; not long after, NBC News's Twitter account reported that two flights had been hijacked and were headed for Ground Zero. These morbid stories were all fake, of course, planted by mischievous hackers seeking infamy and amusement.

 

THE REUTERS HACKTIVISTS WANTED THEIR FAKE STORIES TO BE TAKEN AS FACT

 

But the hackers who planted fake news stories on Reuters's website earlier this month weren't doing it for fun. Reuters was caught in the middle of an "intensifying conflict in cyberspace between supporters and opponents of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad," in the words of one of its reporters, as hackers attempted to co-opt the news agency's credibility in order to support government forces in the Syrian national conflict.

 

...In the past, it would take a mammoth effort to print and distribute a fake version of say, The Guardian, and hardly worth the time. That's not the case online. Imagine squinting at each news story on guardian.co.uk and wondering if it was written by a journalist or an imposter. The news industry could set itself up for a massive credibility loss by ignoring the threat from hackers, and once again sabotage itself by underestimating the disruptive power of the internet.

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Social media takes center stage at RNC | Tampa Bay Times

Social media takes center stage at RNC | Tampa Bay Times | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
For CNN anchor Wolf Blitzer, the promise of social media's impact on coverage of the Republican National Convention is simple:...

 

It can turn reporting the news into a conversation.

 

"Very often, I'll get a tweet from somebody who (notes a mistake) ... and I'll correct it right away," said Blitzer, who wasn't even on Twitter during the 2008 RNC and now has 540,000 followers. "I know it will change our coverage in Tampa."

 

That's the kind of interaction a host of technology companies, media outlets and even convention organizers expect at the RNC; leveraging a host of social media platforms to place huge chunks of what happens here online....

 

[Interesting convention report, assuming it goes ahead - JD]

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Further Decline in Credibility Ratings for Most News Organizations | Pew Research Center

Further Decline in Credibility Ratings for Most News Organizations | Pew Research Center | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Overview For the second time in a decade, the believability ratings for major news organizations have suffered broad-based declines.

 

For the second time in a decade, the believability ratings for major news organizations have suffered broad-based declines. In the new survey, positive believability ratings have fallen significantly for nine of 13 news organizations tested. This follows a similar downturn in positive believability ratings that occurred between 2002 and 2004.

 

The falloff in credibility affects news organizations in most sectors: national newspapers, such as the New York Times and USA Today, all three cable news outlets, as well as the broadcast TV networks and NPR.

 

Across all 13 news organizations included in the survey, the average positive believability rating (3 or 4 on a 4-point scale) is 56%. In 2010, the average positive rating was 62%. A decade ago, the average rating for the news organizations tested was 71%. Since 2002, every news outlet’s believability rating has suffered a double-digit drop, except for local daily newspapers and local TV news. The New York Times was not included in this survey until 2004, but its believability rating has fallen by 13 points since then....

 

[The research presents a challenge to PR and marketing pros and enhances the potential value of social media communications - JD]

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Holding Up a Mirror to Journalism - The Media Equation | David Carr

Holding Up a Mirror to Journalism - The Media Equation | David Carr | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The hacking scandal in Britain has mostly been treated as a malady confined to an island, rather than a signature event in a rugged stretch for journalism worldwide.

 

Imagine this chain of events: a division of a large multinational company is accused of a pattern of corporate misconduct that includes surveillance, hacking into phones and bribery of law enforcement officials....

 

It sounds improbable, like a John Grisham legal thriller about a corrupt law firm or a fast-and-loose brokerage house, but it actually happened at a newspaper company, of all things. Last week seven former executives at News International, the British newspaper division of News Corporation, including Andy Coulson and Rebekah Brooks, were charged in connection with the phone hacking investigation, after years of denials.

 

If this happened in any other industry — the banking sector during the financial crisis, the oil companies after the BP spill, or Blackwater during the Iraq war — you would expect to see a full-court press by journalists seeking to shine a light on a corrupt culture allowed to run amok....

 

[David Carr reminds journalism that it should be judged by the same ethical standards of any business - JD]

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The Future of Media is Currently in Production | Brian Solis

The Future of Media is Currently in Production | Brian Solis | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Broadcast journalism evolves with every new medium that emerges. Social media certainly opened the doors to new forms of content and distribution channels, but in the end, value, consistency and engagement separates those who find a long-term audience from those flail in obscurity. The market for relevant and compelling content is infinite, regardless of medium.


While traditional media learns to adapt, new visionaries arise to push the boundaries and possibilities of media and design fresh business models to support it. Such is true for my next guest on Revolution. Shira Lazar is not only a good friend, she’s also one of the practicing pioneers of new journalism....

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Study finds viewers turning to YouTube for news video, disaster footage | Washington Post

Study finds viewers turning to YouTube for news video, disaster footage | Washington Post | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
NEW YORK — A new study has found that YouTube has become a major platform for news, one where viewers are turning for eyewitness videos in times of major events and natural disasters.

 

The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism on Monday released their examination of 15 months of the most popular news videos on the Google Inc.-owned site. It found that while viewership for TV news still easily outpaces those consuming news on YouTube, the video-sharing site is a growing digital environment where professional journalism mingles with citizen content.

 

“There’s a new form of video journalism on this platform,” said Amy Mitchell, deputy director of the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. “It’s a form in which the relationship between news organizations and citizens is more dynamic and more multiverse than we’ve seen in most other platforms before.”...

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How This Guy Lied His Way Into MSNBC, ABC News, The New York Times and More - Forbes

How This Guy Lied His Way Into MSNBC, ABC News, The New York Times and More - Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Ryan Holiday could be called an “expert.” As head of marketing for American Apparel, an online strategist for Tucker Max, and self-styled “media manipulator,” he can talk social media and modern advertising with the best of them – he’s done so both...

 

online and in print on countless occasions. He is not an expert in barefoot running, investing, vinyl records, or insomnia. But he is a liar. With a little creative use of the internet, he’s been quoted in news sources from small blogs to the most reputable outlets in the country talking about all of those things.

 

Holiday, 25 years old and based in New Orleans, mostly wanted to see if it could be done. He had been getting blogs to write what he wanted for years, and had developed a sense of how stories were put together in the internet age. He thought he could push the envelope a bit further....

 

[Great read - JD]

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Reddit User Scours Social Media for Info About Toronto Shooting | Mashable

Reddit User Scours Social Media for Info About Toronto Shooting | Mashable | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A Reddit user used Twitter to launch a solo investigation into a chaotic and tragic shooting in eastern Toronto on Monday night.

 

After a shooting at a barbecue in eastern Toronto left two dead and 21 wounded, a Reddit user turned to Twitter to figure out all he could learn about those involved in the tragic event and share it with the r/Toronto community, a sub-group for discussion about the city. The post has since gone viral on Reddit and elsewhere on the social web.

 

(Note: The information below has not been independently verified. As the Redditor himself notes, “none of this is concrete evidence of anything’s having happened or anyone’s involvement in the shootings.”)

 

Reddit user BitchslappedByLogic claims that the party was hosted by Twitter user @2ToneShorty based on this post...

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If You Don't Want Your Daughter To Be a Little Asshole, Don't Send Her To Rushbiddies | Gawker

If You Don't Want Your Daughter To Be a Little Asshole, Don't Send Her To Rushbiddies | Gawker | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
In this world—the real world, where human beings are made of skin and bones and plasma—you are one of the many poor souls out there fighting to get (or keep) a job, to keep your bank account in the black just so that you can keep the water running...

 

and the lights on. You worry about the long-term future. How will I support a family? Is true success beyond the average American? Two decades from now, will I be even worse off than I am now? That's the real world.

 

But in the world of filthy rich insane people, the primary worry is this: Did I hire the right image coach for my daughter's sorority rush? The New York Times' Abigail Sullivan Moore took a longform look at what parents are doing to get their little Annyston into Delta Delta Delta, and somehow the word PURGING doesn't appear once. It's quite a feat. Look at this fucking thing...

 

[Sometimes GAWKER rocks! Great storytelling/blogging and take out - JD]

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Journalists Weigh in on 'Reporting it First' | AdWeek

Journalists Weigh in on 'Reporting it First' | AdWeek | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Speed kills, but it is also part of the business...

 

The relentless news landscape of micro scoops can swallow up even the most reputable news organizations and journalists. This afternoon in the increasingly self-referential world of media reportage, The New Republic's Amy Sullivan criticized the industry's rising obsession with breaking news first in her piece, "Who Reported It First? Who Cares."


Sullivan argues that the race to report breaking news first is "often the main factor driving it." Of course, the prime example is the CNN/Fox News Supreme Court verdict debacle last month. Sullivan's claims that speed is hurting journalism are noteworthy given the continued acceleration of the newscycle and the nitpicky toxicity of the social echo chamber. Yet even she notes that when it comes to slowing down the news cycle, "it will never happen."...

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BuzzFeed with a press pass: What happens when the GIF kings try to take Washington?

BuzzFeed with a press pass: What happens when the GIF kings try to take Washington? | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The cats-and-celebs site has its Washington bureau in place and is preparing to mix old-fashioned reporting with new-fashioned packaging.

 

WASHINGTON — You should know going in that this is a story about BuzzFeed that BuzzFeed would never run. This story is longer than the last 10 articles out of the new BuzzFeed Washington, D.C. bureau combined. Some recent examples:

- An airline ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by Barack Obama and Mitt Romney lookalikes
- A photo of second-button-unbuttoned “Casual Joe Biden”

- Paul Ryan’s college fraternity photo
- “Barack Obama Is A Wizard”
- A dozen photos of Tim Pawlenty looking sad...

 

[Can't wait for the sparks and GIFs to fly in the future - JD]

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Reporters: Why are you in Tampa? | BuzzMachine

Reporters: Why are you in Tampa? | BuzzMachine | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

I challenge every journalist in Tampa for the Republican convention — every one of the 15-16,000 of you — to answer this:
* Why are you there?
* What will we learn from you?
* What actual reporting can you possibly do that delivers anything of value more than the infomercial — light on the info, heavy on the ‘mercial — that the conventions have become?
* Would you be better off back at home covering voters and their issues?
* Can we in the strapped news business afford this luxury?

 

Figure that those 15k journos spend $300 a night each on a hotel room times five nights, plus $500 for transportion. That’s $2,000. And I’m figuring they’ll be slurping up free meals and drinks. So $2,000 is probably (pardon me) conservative. That’s $30,000,000. Now multiply that times two conventions. That’s $60,000,000.

 

Why? For what?...

 

[What a great question by Jeff Jarvis! - JD]

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The newsonomics of a New York Times + CNN combination

The newsonomics of a New York Times + CNN combination | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
They're iconic in print and on television, and they're both working to figure out digital. Is there room for more direct partnership between the two?

 

Mark Thompson faces a defining and daunting challenge: Lead The New York Times on that thin tightrope to a new stability, one tethered to the digital world. We’ve seen lots of good ideas already freely offered to the incoming NYT CEO. Let me offer a new one.

 

Let’s imagine what a New York Times/CNN combination would look like — and what it could do for both companies. Combination? Yes, a purposely squishy word. I’m not talking about a merger of the companies. I’m thinking about what each company offers the other strategically, at this point in media history, and how each could see its business advanced. We’ll leave the messy details of corporate development, of partnership, of joint venture, for a later day....

 

[Could be a journalism powerhouse - JD]

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