Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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One-in-Ten ‘Dual-Screened’ the Presidential Debate | Pew Research Center

One-in-Ten ‘Dual-Screened’ the Presidential Debate | Pew Research Center | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The vast majority of Americans say they followed coverage of the first presidential debate between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama, including 56% who followed the debate live. Most of these real-time viewers watched on television, but 11% of live debate watchers were “dual screeners,” following coverage on a computer or mobile device at the same time as following television coverage. Another 3% say they followed the debate live exclusively online.

 

The post-debate survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Oct. 4-7 among 1,006 adults, finds younger Americans are especially likely to be “dual-screeners,” following the debate live on both television and a computer or mobile device.

 

Overall, 32% of those younger than 40 say they followed the debate live online, including 22% who followed it both on television and online, and 10% who followed exclusively on a computer or mobile device....

 

[Demographics and trends are interesting in this study ~ Jeff]

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Web Ink Now: Witnessing a real-time record-breaking social media spectacle

Web Ink Now: Witnessing a real-time record-breaking social media spectacle | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

This afternoon, the online world came together to witness Felix Baumgartner break multiple aerospace records in his Red Bull Stratos mission. And we shared it with each other in real-time.

 

Baumgartner traveled higher in a balloon than anyone – more than 127,800 ft. – and from that height he made the highest skydive, breaking a previous record that had stood for more than 50 years. While in free fall, he traveled Mach 1.24 — 833.9 miles per hour - making him the first human to travel faster than the speed of sound without being inside a craft.

 

It was riveting to witness – a real-time spectacle live on the web in HD that we could share via social networks.

 

A YouTube record

Another record was broken when it was reported that more than 8 million people watched a livestream of the record-breaking attempt.

I learned about the impending jump on, where else, Twitter. When I started to watch the balloon was at about 40,000 feet so I tweeted to my followers and posted on Facebook. Millions of others did the same....

 

[Interesting look at a very social news story ~ Jeff]

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This Is the Future of News | TIME Ideas

This Is the Future of News | TIME Ideas | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
"You all have this notion that news comes from reality," says Rick Stengel, TIME's managing editor.

 

“You all have this notion that news comes from reality,” says Rick Stengel, TIME’s managing editor. But like any other product — or any other “artificial thing,” as Stengel put it, “created by people like us for people like you” — news can change drastically depending on who’s producing it.

 

And with that, Stengel kicked off “Future of News: What’s the Story?,” a 90-minute panel discussion with The New Republic’s Chris Hughes, BuzzFeed’s Jonah Peretti, Pulse‘s Akshay Kothari, and Lara Setrakian of Syria Deeply, a new web-based news platform covering the Syrian crisis. According to them, the future of news is... mobile. insightful, branded, beautiful, social...

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The Economist: A Digital Communications Success Story | Business 2 Community

The Economist: A Digital Communications Success Story | Business 2 Community | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
An institution that has invested heavily in its digital capabilities and is reaping the rewards is The Economist Group.

 

We wrote about The Economist back in July and decided to delve deeper into its impressive media catalogue.


Its digital offering has helped drive the group’s profits up 8.7 per cent ($US101 million) in the year ending 31 March 2012,

 

underpinned by increasing digital subscriptions to its paywalled website and apps. Interestingly, print circulation for The Economist has also doubled over the past 10 years—it’s now selling more than 1.5 million issues each week.


The Economist Online’s figures are the envy of the publishing world. The site attracts 32 million page views and 7.2 million unique visitors each month, with more than 50,000 reader comments per month. The magazine is available for download via iPad and iPhone, Android, Zinio, Nook, Kindle and Blackberry PlayBook, and its online content includes the full editorial from the print edition along with a growing range of unique web-only content, including news, analysis, columns, blogs and multimedia (audio and video files). The site also features a range of research tools and data for subscribers, including free access to searchable archives, as well as The Economist audio edition....

 

[Great example of "old" media shifting to embrace the digital world head on and succeeding. A model for all media. ~ Jeff]

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Let me guess: You sleep with your iPad, don’t you? | Nieman Lab

Let me guess: You sleep with your iPad, don’t you? | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
A new Pew study finds that most news junkies turn to tablets late at night and early in the morning.

 

Chances are good that the warm glowing warming glow of an iPad screen is one of the last things you see before you fall asleep or one of the first things you reach for when you wake up.

 

A study released today by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism finds most news junkies who own tablets use them before 8 a.m. and in the after-work hours. The explosive growth in mobile devices isn’t just changing where we access the news — waiting in line for coffee, sitting on the train, walking down the street — but how much news we consume and when we get it.

 

For many, more devices means more news, according to the study. Pew found 43 percent of tablet owners say they are getting more news now than they were before they got the device, and 31 percent say they’re adding new sources into their information diet....

 

[News trends and appliances worth watching ~ Jeff]

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Digital Lifescapes: Legacy Print Publishers Ponder the Digital Realities

Digital Lifescapes: Legacy Print Publishers Ponder the Digital Realities | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The ongoing transition to digital publishing and online content distribution has created a potentially significant upside opportunity for forward-thinking publishers. But what are the key trends in this rapidly evolving marketplace?

How are electronic newspapers and magazines being monetized? What role do digital newsstands and aggregators play in marketing eNewspapers and eMagazines? And, how are publishers, advertisers and merchants addressing consumer demand for ecommerce capabilities on tablet editions? These are the questions that eMarketer considered for their latest market study of the American ePublishing sector....

 

[Challenges and a reality check for "old" media ~ Jeff]

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Americans don't trust the media, but their reasons often don't add up | LA Times

Americans don't trust the media, but their reasons often don't add up | LA Times | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

It's a drag to be a cultural villain. Lawyers, politicians, unionized teachers -- all have felt the sting of public disdain for their careers, their ethics, themselves. And then there's the lowest of the low: journalists.

 

Being one of that species, I know there's no way to defend the profession without appearing self-serving. But as I hear the unending criticisms of the media -- much of it coming from people who are media figures themselves, and part of it stemming from an intensive and purposeful campaign to discredit media outlets that don't slant the news toward a conservative viewpoint -- I can't help feeling that an awful lot of it reflects confusion and ignorance on the part of the critics.

 

Such critics are not hard to find. A recent Gallup poll showed that 60% of Americans don't trust the media to report the news fully, accurately and fairly, a record high. I see examples of that worsening attitude daily, from conversations with people who blame the media for failing to report on what really matters, to vitriolic Facebook posts from friends who think the media are corporate slaves or liars, to TV commentators who blame the media for ... well, whatever's in the news lately....

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Inside Forbes: What Mobile Means for Journalism and My Restless Nights - Forbes

Inside Forbes: What Mobile Means for Journalism and My Restless Nights - Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Clearly, it's a very different world. As the founder and CEO of a startup, VC's would always ask me, "What keeps you up at night?" It was a tedious question with only one honest answer: raising more money from you guys.

 

Four years later, as chief product officer for a major news brand, I would answer the same question with a single word full of complexities for the future of journalism — mobile. Finding more funding, though difficult, was a well-traveled path. Transitioning to a mobile universe is a new challenge, and one that gets more vexing by the day.

 

That’s why I’m so intrigued with new mobile or mobile-like products. Flipboard, a crowd pleaser for iPad users, recently released a well-received Android app. Two weeks ago, USAToday unveiled a unified mobile and desktop site that mimics tablet experiences. Earlier this week came Quartz, a business news product from Atlantic Media. Quartz is optimized for a mobile-first audience — or, as a New York Times reporter said, for passengers in the “front half of airplanes.” David Bradley, Atlantic’s owner, said it has become “very, very clear to me that digital trumps print, and that pure digital, without any legacy costs, massively trumps print.” Still, Quartz is essentially replicating a legacy print labor model to produce content for tablets....

 

[Thoughtful post from Lewis DVorkin at Forbes - JD]

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Quartz: The new biz-news site is a technological and structural innovator, with only a few hiccups

Quartz: The new biz-news site is a technological and structural innovator, with only a few hiccups | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The site, from the folks who bring you The Atlantic, promises an app-like experience. But there's also risk in breaking two decades of website metaphors.

 

Quartz, the new business news site from Atlantic Media, launched today. It’s one of the most high-profile launches the online news business has seen this year, and that’s because of what it promised: a tablet-first mindset; a digitally appropriate structure; an app-like interface; a new-world business model.

 

I’m rooting for Quartz, both because I like to see news orgs innovate and succeed and because I know some of Quartz’s higher-ups. (Zach Seward, Quartz’ senior editor, was my first hire here at Nieman Lab back in 2008. And Kevin Delaney, the editor-in-chief, and I worked on the same college newspaper back in the 1990s.) I think it’s got a lot of promise — it feels of-the-moment and fresh in a way I haven’t seen in a new news site since The Verge debuted last year. But its ambitions also run up against some hard questions of how people consume news in 2012. Here’s my quick take on what Quartz offered on Day 1....

 

[This business news site is definitely worth following - JD]

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Why Newspapers Are Dying

Why Newspapers Are Dying | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Newspapers don't need any more bad news. Unfortunately, thanks to a small and obscure federal agency, they just got some. Ed Fouhy breaks down the latest blow in their struggle for survival and asks, whither Boston journalism?

 

The result has been a frantic effort to save themselves, with no one quite sure how to do it. Some have simply raised the price of a print subscription. Others, including The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Globe, have built paywalls around their online news. But those have met with mixed success at best – so far the Globe has just 23,000 Web-only subscribers, about a tenth of its print readership – and only about 300 of the country’s roughly 1,700 dailies have put them up.

 

Still other publishers are pursuing a different strategy. Advance Communications, owner of the New Orleans Times-Picayune and other papers, is reducing the Times-Picayune staff and concentrating on its website – and publishing a print newspaper just three times a week. The new schedule, which begins Oct. 1, will leave one of the country’s major cities without a daily newspaper....

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Google News at 10: How the Algorithm Won Over the News Industry | The Atlantic

Google News at 10: How the Algorithm Won Over the News Industry | The Atlantic | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Google's "billions of clicks" are only half of the story.

 

There is, on the one hand, an incredibly simple explanation for the shift in news organizations' attitude toward Google: clicks. Google News was founded 10 years ago -- September 22, 2002 -- and has since functioned not merely as an aggregator of news, but also as a source of traffic to news sites. Google News, its executives tell me, now "algorithmically harvests" articles from more than 50,000 news sources across 72 editions and 30 languages. And Google News-powered results, Google says, are viewed by about 1 billion unique users a week. (Yep, that's billion with a b.) Which translates, for news outlets overall, to more than 4 billion clicks each month: 1 billion from Google News itself and an additional 3 billion from web search.

 

As a Google representative put it, "That's about 100,000 business opportunities we provide publishers every minute."

 

Google emphasizes numbers like these not just because they are fairly staggering in the context of a numbers-challenged news industry, but also because they help the company to make its case to that industry. (For more on this, see James Fallows's masterful piece from the June 2010 issue of The Atlantic.) Talking to Google News executives and team members myself in 2010 -- the height of the industry's aggregatory backlash -- I often got a sense of veiled frustration. And of just a bit of bafflement. When you believe that you're working to amplify the impact of good journalism, it can be strange to find yourself publicly resented by journalists. It can be even stranger to find yourself referred to as a vampire. Or a pirate. Or whatever....

 

[Thoughtful post and reflections on the relationship between Google and news - JD]

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New BBC chief vows to re-invent content, not just re-purpose it

New BBC chief vows to re-invent content, not just re-purpose it | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
In a bold first-day speech, the BBC's new boss says the corporation must stop thinking that online innovation means repurposing broadcast content and instead 'create genuinely digital content for the first time'.

 

...“Yet it’s the quest for this – genuinely new forms of digital content – that represents the next profound moment of change we need to prepare for if we’re to deserve a new charter.

 

“As we increasingly make use of a distribution model – the internet – principally characterised by its return path, its capacity for interaction, its hunger for more and more information about the habits and preferences of individual users, then we need to be ready to create content which exploits this new environment – content which shifts the height of our ambition from live output to living output.

 

“We need to be ready to produce and create genuinely digital content for the first time. And we need to understand better what it will mean to assemble, edit and present such content in a digital setting where social recommendation and other forms of curation will play a much more influential role....

 

[The new leader points to fresh news directions ahead for the BBC. His remarks are relevant to content producers, marketing and PR too. - JD]

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Internet Archive Amasses All TV News Since 2009 | NY Times

Internet Archive Amasses All TV News Since 2009 | NY Times | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The Internet Archive plans to make more than 350,000 programs available on its Web site beginning Tuesday.

 

Inspired by a pillar of antiquity, the Library of Alexandria, Brewster Kahle has a grand vision for the Internet Archive, the giant aggregator and digitizer of data, which he founded and leads.

 

“We want to collect all the books, music and video that has ever been produced by humans,” Mr. Kahle said.

 

As of Tuesday, the archive’s online collection will include every morsel of news produced in the last three years by 20 different channels, encompassing more than 1,000 news series that have generated more than 350,000 separate programs devoted to news.

 

The latest ambitious effort by the archive, which has already digitized millions of books and tried to collect everything published on every Web page for the last 15 years (that adds up to more than 150 billion Web pages), is intended not only for researchers, Mr. Kahle said, but also for average citizens who make up some of the site’s estimated two million visitors each day. “The focus is to help the American voter to better be able to examine candidates and issues,” Mr. Kahle said.....

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Dick Costolo says being the 'second screen' is the future of Twitter

Dick Costolo says being the 'second screen' is the future of Twitter | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Twitter CEO Dick Costolo says the most powerful feature of Twitter is the way it can show us what others watching the same event are thinking, and that the best use of this feature is as a companion to a televised event like the Olympics.

 

As Twitter has been evolving over the past year or so — an evolution that has caused some upheaval in the company’s ecosystem of developers and power users, many of whom seem to feel slighted by Twitter’s behavior — it hasn’t always been clear what Twitter wanted to be when it grew up. Did it want to be the cool user-generated news network for revolutions in Egypt, or the handmaiden to traditional media players like CNN and NBC, driving Twitter users to their TV programs? In a recent interview with American Public Media’s Marketplace radio show, CEO Dick Costolo made it pretty clear what he sees as the company’s future, and it is as a complementary “second screen” for existing media....

 

[Interesting perspective by Twitter CEO on Twitter as complementary news channel ~ Jeff]

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