Public Relations & Social Media Insight
307.8K views | +132 today
Follow
Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Hybrid PR
Scoop.it!

There Is No Such Thing As 'Objective' Journalism — Get Over It ... | Mediaite

There Is No Such Thing As 'Objective' Journalism — Get Over It ... | Mediaite | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

You read that correctly. There is no such thing as objectivity in journalism. And it's time to get over it. Every journalist has a political point-of-view and they don't magically check that at the door the minute they land a job.

 

[Many would disagree with Andrew Kirell's point of view. I think it's an accurate reflection of journalism today ~ Jeff]


Via LPM Comunicação SA
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Anderson Cooper Live: CANCELED | HuffPo

Anderson Cooper Live: CANCELED | HuffPo | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Anderson Cooper's daytime show "Anderson Live" has been canceled, the New York Times reported Monday.

 

Anderson Cooper's daytime show "Anderson Live" has been canceled, the New York Times reported Monday.

 

The syndicated show, which debuted last fall and is currently in its second season, will not return after next summer. A studio executive who spoke to the Times on the condition of anonymity cited low ratings as the reason for the decision....

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Social Media and Journalists
Scoop.it!

CNN’s head of social news: Twitter forces journos to report better

CNN’s head of social news: Twitter forces journos to report better | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

“Services like Twitter remind us that reporting just the facts of an event isn’t enough. We all hear about what’s happening from everywhere. What journalists and thinkers and experts in subjects that matter should do is add deep context and understanding to events. When we are all inundated with unending streams of information, what matters most is context ...”


Via Mindy McAdams
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Data, uncertainty, and specialization: What journalism can learn from FiveThirtyEight’s election coverage | Nieman Lab

Data, uncertainty, and specialization: What journalism can learn from FiveThirtyEight’s election coverage | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Nate Silver's number-crunching blog is perceived as a threat by some traditional political reporters — but its model has lessons for all journalists.

 

Nate Silver’s FiveThiryEight blog at The New York Times really only does one thing: It makes election predictions. But it does this differently than pretty much everyone else, because it aggregates all available polls using a statistical model calibrated with past election data. He has his critics among the political class, but to my eye, it makes pretty much all other election “horse race” coverage look primitive and uninformed.

 

FiveThirtyEight has obvious lessons for journalism about data-related topics such as statistics and uncertainty. But I think I also see wider implications for the evolving role of the political journalist. At heart, these changes are about the response of journalism to a world that is increasingly complex and networked....

 

[Thoughtful reading on journalism ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

People still like to read, argues Economist editor-in-chief John Micklethwait | Lean Back 2.0

People still like to read, argues Economist editor-in-chief John Micklethwait | Lean Back 2.0 | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Last week, John Micklethwait, editor-in-chief of The Economist, spoke on NPR’s “The Diane Rehm Show”, along with Stephen Shepard, dean of the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate School of Journalism and former senior editor at Newsweek and BusinessWeek. Given the recent announcement by Newsweek and the difficulties most print publishers are going through, both discussed the future of news magazines in this digital age.

 

Here are some highlights from the interview....

 

[Great discussion on news trends and the future of news ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

A journalist's guide to verifying images | IJNet

A journalist's guide to verifying images | IJNet | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Breaking news sometimes brings out people who want to fool the public with doctored images, so every journalist should know how to verify the authenticity of photos and videos.

 

Enter digital journalists Mandy Jenkins and Craig Silverman, who are perfecting the art of online verification.

 

Jenkins, social news editor for the Huffington Post, and Silverman, editorial director of OpenFile.ca and editor and author of Regret the Error, shared their advice during their presentation, "B.S. Detection for Journalists," at the recent 2011 Online News Association Conference in Boston.

 

Here are their tips for verifying images...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

How to: use social media in newsgathering | How to succeed in journalism | Journalism.co.uk

How to: use social media in newsgathering | How to succeed in journalism | Journalism.co.uk | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
14 pointers on finding sources and stories using social media...

 

Finding sources, nurturing contacts and checking facts by phone have long been key to successful journalism. This guide on using social media to research stories outlines the many ways reporters can put those traditional journalism skills into practice on social media platforms.

 

The first problem in searching is one of noise. According to figures from March, more than 1 billion tweets were being posted every three days, so how can journalists sort the social media chaos and find contacts and stories?

 

This guide gathers tips from Malachy Browne, news editor of social news gathering agency Storyful; David Wyllie, an editor at Breaking News, a social media breaking news service owned by NBC News; and investigative journalist and trainer in advanced online research skills Colin Meek....

 

[These tips will be useful for PR, bloggers and content producers too ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Newsweek + Clark Kent = Bad Week for Print | Mike Schaffer

Newsweek + Clark Kent = Bad Week for Print | Mike Schaffer | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Newsweek cancels print edition and Clark Kent quits the Daily Planet. What's going on with the world of print?

 

...Add it to the announcement last week that rocked the print industry, Newsweek ending it’s print circulation, and it forms a bleak picture for print.


Why do I compare the Daily Planet’s loss to Newsweek’s digital shift?


Easy. Monkey see, monkey do.


My journalism drive came from what I saw. And what 12-year-old me saw was a top-shelf newspaper reporter who saved the world. And that inspiration is gone.


Newsweek, in print for 80 years, has been a constant in the ever-changing newsstand. And now it’s all in bits and bytes....

 

[My thought is that for every magazine or newspaper that fails a new and more relevant news innovation will take its place ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Nieman Reports | Breaking News| Mastering the art of disruptive innovation in journalism

Nieman Reports | Breaking News| Mastering the art of disruptive innovation in journalism | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Mastering the art of disruptive innovation in journalism...

 

[Superb article from the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard covers three primary aspects of the challenge of disruption to the traditional news business:

Part One: Always Consider The Audience First
Part Two: When Times Change, Change Your Business
Part Three: Build Capabilities For a New World.

 

...Drawing on previous research, this article highlights three key areas for those in the news business to consider:

-  First, we'll provide a framework to understand what it is that audiences value and where opportunities exist for newsrooms to take advantage of this.

-  Second, we'll explain the impact of disruption on traditional newsroom business models and suggest ways to exploit other aspects of the value network to increase revenues and drive innovation.

-  Finally, we'll examine the role of culture and capabilities in an organization and how best to manage them. As the landscape changes, capabilities and culture may need to change too—or they can become a liability in the new world....

 

It provides excellent insight into the current and future potential disruption and suggests a prescription for survival. ~ Jeff]

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

One-in-Ten ‘Dual-Screened’ the Presidential Debate | Pew Research Center

One-in-Ten ‘Dual-Screened’ the Presidential Debate | Pew Research Center | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The vast majority of Americans say they followed coverage of the first presidential debate between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama, including 56% who followed the debate live. Most of these real-time viewers watched on television, but 11% of live debate watchers were “dual screeners,” following coverage on a computer or mobile device at the same time as following television coverage. Another 3% say they followed the debate live exclusively online.

 

The post-debate survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Oct. 4-7 among 1,006 adults, finds younger Americans are especially likely to be “dual-screeners,” following the debate live on both television and a computer or mobile device.

 

Overall, 32% of those younger than 40 say they followed the debate live online, including 22% who followed it both on television and online, and 10% who followed exclusively on a computer or mobile device....

 

[Demographics and trends are interesting in this study ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Web Ink Now: Witnessing a real-time record-breaking social media spectacle

Web Ink Now: Witnessing a real-time record-breaking social media spectacle | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

This afternoon, the online world came together to witness Felix Baumgartner break multiple aerospace records in his Red Bull Stratos mission. And we shared it with each other in real-time.

 

Baumgartner traveled higher in a balloon than anyone – more than 127,800 ft. – and from that height he made the highest skydive, breaking a previous record that had stood for more than 50 years. While in free fall, he traveled Mach 1.24 — 833.9 miles per hour - making him the first human to travel faster than the speed of sound without being inside a craft.

 

It was riveting to witness – a real-time spectacle live on the web in HD that we could share via social networks.

 

A YouTube record

Another record was broken when it was reported that more than 8 million people watched a livestream of the record-breaking attempt.

I learned about the impending jump on, where else, Twitter. When I started to watch the balloon was at about 40,000 feet so I tweeted to my followers and posted on Facebook. Millions of others did the same....

 

[Interesting look at a very social news story ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

This Is the Future of News | TIME Ideas

This Is the Future of News | TIME Ideas | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
"You all have this notion that news comes from reality," says Rick Stengel, TIME's managing editor.

 

“You all have this notion that news comes from reality,” says Rick Stengel, TIME’s managing editor. But like any other product — or any other “artificial thing,” as Stengel put it, “created by people like us for people like you” — news can change drastically depending on who’s producing it.

 

And with that, Stengel kicked off “Future of News: What’s the Story?,” a 90-minute panel discussion with The New Republic’s Chris Hughes, BuzzFeed’s Jonah Peretti, Pulse‘s Akshay Kothari, and Lara Setrakian of Syria Deeply, a new web-based news platform covering the Syrian crisis. According to them, the future of news is... mobile. insightful, branded, beautiful, social...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

The Economist: A Digital Communications Success Story | Business 2 Community

The Economist: A Digital Communications Success Story | Business 2 Community | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
An institution that has invested heavily in its digital capabilities and is reaping the rewards is The Economist Group.

 

We wrote about The Economist back in July and decided to delve deeper into its impressive media catalogue.


Its digital offering has helped drive the group’s profits up 8.7 per cent ($US101 million) in the year ending 31 March 2012,

 

underpinned by increasing digital subscriptions to its paywalled website and apps. Interestingly, print circulation for The Economist has also doubled over the past 10 years—it’s now selling more than 1.5 million issues each week.


The Economist Online’s figures are the envy of the publishing world. The site attracts 32 million page views and 7.2 million unique visitors each month, with more than 50,000 reader comments per month. The magazine is available for download via iPad and iPhone, Android, Zinio, Nook, Kindle and Blackberry PlayBook, and its online content includes the full editorial from the print edition along with a growing range of unique web-only content, including news, analysis, columns, blogs and multimedia (audio and video files). The site also features a range of research tools and data for subscribers, including free access to searchable archives, as well as The Economist audio edition....

 

[Great example of "old" media shifting to embrace the digital world head on and succeeding. A model for all media. ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

What it’s like to tell a story without social media and why I will never do so again (Guest blog) | Charlie Beckett

What it’s like to tell a story without social media and why I will never do so again (Guest blog) | Charlie Beckett | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Imagine doing your journalism without any social media. Imagine your newsroom is actually restricted by law in what social media it can use. That was the situation for Austrian radio correspondent Nadja Hahn who has spent the last month at Polis, LSE researching the value of social media for public service journalism. Here is her valedictory post.

 

My stay in London is coming to an end. In the past five weeks I visited the BBC, Channel4, ITV, CNN and spoke to lots of journalists, experts and academics. Thanks to all for sharing their thoughts with me. I had my own personal social media crash course.

 

So, going home now I am thinking about how I could be applying all that knowledge to my own reporting to make my stories better, provide more public value, reach a larger audience and get fresh ideas. I want to share my thoughts with you, as some of you might still be struggling to see the value social media could bring to a story. Like I was....

 

[Lots of lessons and insight ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Why Time Magazine Used Instagram To Cover Hurricane Sandy | Forbes

Why Time Magazine Used Instagram To Cover Hurricane Sandy | Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
To document the effects of Hurricane Sandy on the northeast, Time magazine turned to Instagram, a.k.a. that iPhone app your sister-in-law uses to document her creative table settings. And the results were impressive.

 

If there was still any debate about whether serious photojournalism can take place in the context of camera phones and cutesy retro filters, it’s over now.

 

To document the effects of Hurricane Sandy on the northeast, Time magazine turned to Instagram, a.k.a. that iPhone app your sister-in-law uses to document her creative table settings. And the results were impressive.

 

As the storm closed in on the coast Monday morning, Time’s director of photography, Kira Pollack, rounded up five photographers from the region and gave them access to the magazine’s Instagram feed. The photographers it sought out – Michael Christopher Brown, Benjamin Lowy, Ed Kashi, Andrew Quilty and Stephen Wilkes — are all heavy users of the Facebook-owned social photo platform....

 

[Instagram helped TIME get hurricane photos to readers fast.~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Hurricane Sandy: story forms | Nieman Storyboard

Hurricane Sandy: story forms | Nieman Storyboard | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The Hurricane Superstorm Sandy storylines are still unfolding, but one thing became clear on Monday as winds and water overtook New York City and New Jersey in historic proportions: Digital media deepened the transformation of the disaster narrative.

 

Here’s some of what’s out there today in various storytelling forms...

 

[Very interesting to see the various forms of storytelling ~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
Scoop.it!

Wednesday Q&A: Jake Levine on the fate of News.me, personalized news, and reinventing Digg | Nieman Lab

Wednesday Q&A: Jake Levine on the fate of News.me, personalized news, and reinventing Digg | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
"One of the things that happens to come with this notion of social discovery is just information overload.

 

News.me’s announcement last week that it was pulling its iOS apps for iPad and iPhone surprised more than a few. For over a year, the Betaworks-backed news discovery tool has offered users a way to cut out the clutter and find the news that matters to them as filtered through their friends on social networks.

 

But News.me, like a growing list of companies, says Twitter is largely to blame for the end of their run. More specifically, Twitter’s recent tightening of its API terms and display requirements — which has been a cause for concern (if not freakouts) for developers in and outside newsrooms — and Twitter’s own push into discovery products.

 

Jake Levine, general manager of Digg and News.me, writing in the News.me blog, said the apps were “deemed to be in violation” of Twitter’s new requirements. So they made a choice: “Here’s what it comes down to: we don’t want to invest time and energy into an application that competes with a platform on which it relies.”...

 

[Good read for those following social media news trends~ Jeff]

more...
No comment yet.