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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
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Gallup is very upset at Nate Silver | Salon

Gallup is very upset at Nate Silver | Salon | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The polling firm complains operations like FiveThirtyEight could spoil polling for everyone...

 

Did Gallup just blame Nate Silver for ruining the art and science of polling?

 

You don’t have to read too far between the lines of a statement from Gallup’s editor in chief, Frank Newport, published on Friday, to get that impression.

 

Newport first attempts the formidable task of defending Gallup’s polling accuracy during the 2012 campaign. Perhaps he was anticipating Silver’s Saturday column, which labeled Gallup the most inaccurate pollster of all the firms that measured voter sentiment this year. But Silver was hardly alone in wondering why Gallup regularly reported numbers much more favorable to Romney than anyone else in 2012. We deserve an explanation a little less lame than Newport’s: what’s the big fuss? Gallup wasn’t really off by that much....

 

[Suck it up Gallup and do a better job. ~ Jeff]

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The future of the feature: Breaking out of templates to build customized reading experiences | Nieman Lab

The future of the feature: Breaking out of templates to build customized reading experiences | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
In print, decades of design language have helped publications draw extra attention of readers. But news web design has mostly been straitjacketed in rigid templates. A few news sites are trying to break out.

 

When it comes to reading long form, the web can be an ugly, distracting place. It’s the reason why services like Instapaper and Pocket (née Read It Later) exist: to strip content of its context — noisy site designs, advertisements, and other unnecessary elements. But perhaps we’re moving into a new era where more of the web is clean and readable. Maybe the future of web publications will be beautiful enough that the reading experience is more enjoyable in its natural habitat.

 

This is how I felt, at least, when I came across ESPN.com’s “The Long Strange Trip of Dock Ellis,” a gorgeously designed feature about the Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher who threw a no-hitter while under the influence of LSD. It’s arguably one of baseball’s most colorful tales; this take on it is certainly one of the most ambitious web designs ever attempted by a traditional media company for a single article. The piece is generously adorned with accompanying visuals — photos of Ellis, memorabilia like trading cards, pull quotes, all moving and sliding while the reader scrolls. The reading experience is very comfortable on both desktop and tablet, thanks to a larger text size and generous amounts of white space. It’s feels like an experience instead of a block of words surrounded by the detritus of the web....

 

[This ESPN story is a fascinating design innovation for a news organization. ~ Jeff]

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Brilliant New Yorker Cover Captures Sandy Psyche | PR Blog News

Brilliant New Yorker Cover Captures Sandy Psyche | PR Blog News | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The New Yorker cover brilliantly captures the psyce of Sandy to the battered lower Manhattan.

 

The New Yorker revealed the cover of this week’s issue, which comments on Hurricane Sandy, the blackouts of lower Manhattan, and the upcoming election. Artist Adrian Tomine described how he ended up connecting the storm’s destruction with the election: “Where I was in Brooklyn, I don’t think I would have even known that there was a major storm happening,” he said. “So I spent the whole night glued to the Internet and watching everything unfolding, just being shocked that this kind of dramatic destruction was happening just miles outside my home. And I started thinking about how it would affect the election…and somehow these two significant events just came together into that one image for me.”...

 

[The New Yorker is two for two in its cover art ~ Jeff]

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The newsonomics of the newspaper industry as the Republican Party

The newsonomics of the newspaper industry as the Republican Party | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
White, older, and male — the audience for newspapers in the United States looks a lot like the support base of the GOP. As Republicans think about broadening their appeal, can papers do the same?

 

The pictures told much of the story. As the networks beamed in live coverage of Barack Obama’s and Mitt Romney’s gatherings on election nights, their anchors made similar observations — some gingerly, some more prominently.

 

The Romney crowd was overwhelmingly white and older. The Obama crowd was mixed in color and younger in age.

 

The presidential vote bore out the videography. The numbers picked off the assembly line of news stories have been astoundingly, and properly, reflective of the new state of America (all data via CNN)...

 

[Interesting comparison of GOP with newspaper industry by Ken Doctor. ~ Jeff]

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Transmedia Journalism in 499 Words

Transmedia Journalism in 499 Words | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Kevin Moloney: "Transmedia journalism is designing a project to unfold across multiple media in an expansive rather than repetitive way" ...

 

[Excellent overview of Transmedia storytelling ~ Jeff]


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Motor Trend Journalist Also Taking Money To Be A Spokesperson For An Oil Company

Motor Trend Journalist Also Taking Money To Be A Spokesperson For An Oil Company | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Motor Trend's Jessi Lang says she is a journalist who wants to help "build relationships" between that publication and its readers while covering the auto industry.

 

She's also being paid to represent oil company Phiillips 66 as a spokesperson who is trying to help influence young people to buy their gas, something Motor Trend doesn't appear to be telling its readers.

 

Taking payment from a potential newsmaker is a generally frowned upon practice, but Lang, and the PR firm representing Phillips 66, say Motor Trend approves of her simultaneously representing an automotive publication and a company that's part of the automotive industry....

 

[Ethically challenged? ~ Jeff]

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How many fake Sandy pictures were really shared on social media?

How many fake Sandy pictures were really shared on social media? | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Dramatic images of hurricane Sandy have made it into the news and have been shared via social media.

 

Farida Vis and Axel Bruns have examined the top 50 most tweeted images and discuss how many of the images shared were actually fake....

 

[it's a challenging task to verify authenticity of photos, especially in a tragedy  Jeff]

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What it’s like to tell a story without social media and why I will never do so again (Guest blog) | Charlie Beckett

What it’s like to tell a story without social media and why I will never do so again (Guest blog) | Charlie Beckett | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Imagine doing your journalism without any social media. Imagine your newsroom is actually restricted by law in what social media it can use. That was the situation for Austrian radio correspondent Nadja Hahn who has spent the last month at Polis, LSE researching the value of social media for public service journalism. Here is her valedictory post.

 

My stay in London is coming to an end. In the past five weeks I visited the BBC, Channel4, ITV, CNN and spoke to lots of journalists, experts and academics. Thanks to all for sharing their thoughts with me. I had my own personal social media crash course.

 

So, going home now I am thinking about how I could be applying all that knowledge to my own reporting to make my stories better, provide more public value, reach a larger audience and get fresh ideas. I want to share my thoughts with you, as some of you might still be struggling to see the value social media could bring to a story. Like I was....

 

[Lots of lessons and insight ~ Jeff]

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Why Time Magazine Used Instagram To Cover Hurricane Sandy | Forbes

Why Time Magazine Used Instagram To Cover Hurricane Sandy | Forbes | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
To document the effects of Hurricane Sandy on the northeast, Time magazine turned to Instagram, a.k.a. that iPhone app your sister-in-law uses to document her creative table settings. And the results were impressive.

 

If there was still any debate about whether serious photojournalism can take place in the context of camera phones and cutesy retro filters, it’s over now.

 

To document the effects of Hurricane Sandy on the northeast, Time magazine turned to Instagram, a.k.a. that iPhone app your sister-in-law uses to document her creative table settings. And the results were impressive.

 

As the storm closed in on the coast Monday morning, Time’s director of photography, Kira Pollack, rounded up five photographers from the region and gave them access to the magazine’s Instagram feed. The photographers it sought out – Michael Christopher Brown, Benjamin Lowy, Ed Kashi, Andrew Quilty and Stephen Wilkes — are all heavy users of the Facebook-owned social photo platform....

 

[Instagram helped TIME get hurricane photos to readers fast.~ Jeff]

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Hurricane Sandy: story forms | Nieman Storyboard

Hurricane Sandy: story forms | Nieman Storyboard | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The Hurricane Superstorm Sandy storylines are still unfolding, but one thing became clear on Monday as winds and water overtook New York City and New Jersey in historic proportions: Digital media deepened the transformation of the disaster narrative.

 

Here’s some of what’s out there today in various storytelling forms...

 

[Very interesting to see the various forms of storytelling ~ Jeff]

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Wednesday Q&A: Jake Levine on the fate of News.me, personalized news, and reinventing Digg | Nieman Lab

Wednesday Q&A: Jake Levine on the fate of News.me, personalized news, and reinventing Digg | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
"One of the things that happens to come with this notion of social discovery is just information overload.

 

News.me’s announcement last week that it was pulling its iOS apps for iPad and iPhone surprised more than a few. For over a year, the Betaworks-backed news discovery tool has offered users a way to cut out the clutter and find the news that matters to them as filtered through their friends on social networks.

 

But News.me, like a growing list of companies, says Twitter is largely to blame for the end of their run. More specifically, Twitter’s recent tightening of its API terms and display requirements — which has been a cause for concern (if not freakouts) for developers in and outside newsrooms — and Twitter’s own push into discovery products.

 

Jake Levine, general manager of Digg and News.me, writing in the News.me blog, said the apps were “deemed to be in violation” of Twitter’s new requirements. So they made a choice: “Here’s what it comes down to: we don’t want to invest time and energy into an application that competes with a platform on which it relies.”...

 

[Good read for those following social media news trends~ Jeff]

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Hurricane Sandy and Twitter as a self-cleaning oven for news | GigaOm

Hurricane Sandy and Twitter as a self-cleaning oven for news | GigaOm | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Critics of social media like to focus on how much fake news gets circulated during events like Hurricane Sandy, but Twitter and other services are also quick to correct those kinds of reports, and have become part of an expanding ecosystem of real-time news.


By now, most people have gotten used to the idea that Twitter becomes a kind of real-time newswire during events like Hurricane Sandy: a never-ending stream of news reports and photos, thanks in part to services like Instagram, and for some people at least a crucial lifeline of information during power outages. Can you believe everything you read during such an event? Clearly not, since there were innumerable false reports and fake photos circulating on Monday night. But what’s interesting isn’t that there was fake news — it’s how quickly those fakes were exposed and debunked, not just by Twitter users themselves but by an emerging ecosystem of blogs and social networks working together....

 

[Thoughtful post on news and Twitter. ~ Jeff]


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Soundslides: A Brief Introduction - Journalists' Toolkit

Soundslides: A Brief Introduction - Journalists' Toolkit | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Resources for journalists and storytellers who are learning to use multimedia tools and techniques.

 

Soundslides is a simple tool that builds simple audio slideshows, with optional captions. That’s all it does. But that’s actually quite a lot — especially because Soundslides is truly “ridiculously simple” to use.

Soundslides does not produce video files, and you cannot import video into Soundslides. (If you have paid for your copy of Soundslides, see this page.)

 

Soundslides uses still photos, a single audio file (MP3 format) and text.

 

To see a good example of what Soundslides can do, watch this story from National Public Radio: Crafting China’s Future Champions (2008)....

 

[Mindy McAdams reviews this useful tool in detail ~ Jeff]

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The new propaganda: Armies take war to Twitter in Gaza conflict

The new propaganda: Armies take war to Twitter in Gaza conflict | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

As Israeli and Palestinian forces clash in Gaza this week, those same armies are engaging in a real-time battle of hashtags and twitpics, trying to win the hearts and minds of watchers around the globe.

 

Propaganda used to be about full-color posters and dropping leaflets from airplanes. Now, the Israel Defense Forces and the Hamas military Al Qassam Brigades are taking to Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Flickr, instantly sharing photos, videos and granular news bites in English, so that they can reach the broadest possible audience.

 

"What is happening here is that both Israel and Hamas are using social media to communicate over to the other side in the conflict and the broader international community," Charles Ries, former ambassador to Greece and vice president of the international division of the RAND Corporation, told NBC News....

 

[War for the words and minds on social media? ~ Jeff]

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The newsonomics of thin ice, from the BBC and FT to The New York Times and The Washington Post

The newsonomics of thin ice, from the BBC and FT to The New York Times and The Washington Post | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Some of the world's biggest news organizations, once rocks of stability, are showing signs of unstable foundations.

 

The cracks got a little louder this week.

 

For most of a decade, news companies have been operating on thinning ice. This week, events on both seaboards of the Atlantic displayed anew just how thin the foundations on which many major news operations operate are. With each crack comes a new sense of mortality and, thankfully, motivation.

 

Here’s a quick chart to demonstrate what’s at stake, just with the companies most lately in the news....

 

[Struggling for survival at BBC, Financial Times, New York Times and Washington Post ~ Jeff]

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Are smartphones now essential for journalism? | Adam Tinworth

Are smartphones now essential for journalism? | Adam Tinworth | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Can a serious online journalist really manage without a modern smartphone now?

 

Between hurricane Sandy and the US presidential elections we now have confirmation, if you needed it, that Instagram is a big social player. I can see why Facebook bought it - there's plenty of evidence that people interact more around photos than anything else on Facebook. Instagram - as a pure photo social network - has an obvious appeal. And people are using it to share so much material around big news events that reporters just can't afford to ignore it.

 

Instagram skills are pretty much an essential part of the social media journalist toolbox now. Last week I did some work with the Interhacktives on verification and identification of images from Instagram. It was a good session - but it did expose a problem. A few of the students had BlackBerries or older model Android phones that didn't support Instagram....

 

[Interesting question, great topic ~ Jeff]

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7 ways online media benefits public relations | PR Daily

7 ways online media benefits public relations | PR Daily | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The massive shift toward digital media continues for new and traditional press outlets. Here’s how you can explain the change to your clients, including why it helps them.

 

...A few weeks ago, Newsweek became the latest magazine to announce it would cease publication of its print edition in favor of a digital-only format by year’s end. This isn’t the first announcement of its kind in 2012: SmartMoney Magazine killed its print publication in the summer, and rumors have swirled that the U.K.’s The Guardian is considering a switch to a digital-only edition.

 

This trend will likely continue in the coming years as, according to the Pew Research Center’s statistics on print vs. online media, more than half of Americans receive their news from digital sources, and the number of people relying on social media exclusively for their news has doubled in the past two years.

 

So how do public relations pros communicate this ever-changing landscape and its importance to clients?...

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From Storm Sandy to the election, speculation dominates the US media

From Storm Sandy to the election, speculation dominates the US media | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Emily Bell: Disruptive statistics and assumptions are skewing the way politics is being reported...

 

America experienced a moment last week when forecast became fact; shockingly, concretely. Tomorrow, the same thing will happen. A speculative river will solidify into a hard fact. Whether it is the trajectory of the "super storm" Sandy, or the outcome of the presidential election, recent US media discourse has been dominated by forecasts, forecasting and those who make and disseminate them.

 

Informed judgment, or speculation as it is less flatteringly known, has formed a key component of reporting for as long as the practice itself.

 

The faulty forecast has become the dry rot in the flimsy framework of public trust in journalism. Failures to adequately anticipate phenomena, from al-Qaida's rise to the financial system's collapse, have contributed to an erosion of credibility. The "bendy tree" journalism of wind-blown TV news reporters has too often misled audiences about the threat of weather systems; the charts say one thing, the man in the Berghaus clinging to a lamppost another.

 

As with every other branch of journalism, the dynamics of reporting "what will happen" are shifting from the qualitative model of expert opinion to the quantitative model of what can be extrapolated from measurement.

 

[To some, growing use of speculation in journalism is concerning ~ Jeff]

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Is the future of serious journalism in the hands of corporate media? | ZDNet

Is the future of serious journalism in the hands of corporate media? | ZDNet | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Corporations are beginning to produce serious journalism. Is this the funding model for the future of high quality journalism?

 

As the business models for serious journalism continue to erode where will we get the quality media we need as a society to make important decisions about our future?

 

I've been warning people: "Special interest groups will gladly pay for the media they want you to read, but you won't pay for the media you need to read."

 

Software engineers have a saying: GIGO, garbage in, garbage out.

If you start with garbage data you will get a garbage result. That's the future we are heading towards, a future where our media is corrupted with information that serves the goals of special interest groups....

 

[Tom Foremski asks a sobering question ~ Jeff]

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There Is No Such Thing As 'Objective' Journalism — Get Over It ... | Mediaite

There Is No Such Thing As 'Objective' Journalism — Get Over It ... | Mediaite | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

You read that correctly. There is no such thing as objectivity in journalism. And it's time to get over it. Every journalist has a political point-of-view and they don't magically check that at the door the minute they land a job.

 

[Many would disagree with Andrew Kirell's point of view. I think it's an accurate reflection of journalism today ~ Jeff]


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Anderson Cooper Live: CANCELED | HuffPo

Anderson Cooper Live: CANCELED | HuffPo | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Anderson Cooper's daytime show "Anderson Live" has been canceled, the New York Times reported Monday.

 

Anderson Cooper's daytime show "Anderson Live" has been canceled, the New York Times reported Monday.

 

The syndicated show, which debuted last fall and is currently in its second season, will not return after next summer. A studio executive who spoke to the Times on the condition of anonymity cited low ratings as the reason for the decision....

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CNN’s head of social news: Twitter forces journos to report better

CNN’s head of social news: Twitter forces journos to report better | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

“Services like Twitter remind us that reporting just the facts of an event isn’t enough. We all hear about what’s happening from everywhere. What journalists and thinkers and experts in subjects that matter should do is add deep context and understanding to events. When we are all inundated with unending streams of information, what matters most is context ...”


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Data, uncertainty, and specialization: What journalism can learn from FiveThirtyEight’s election coverage | Nieman Lab

Data, uncertainty, and specialization: What journalism can learn from FiveThirtyEight’s election coverage | Nieman Lab | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Nate Silver's number-crunching blog is perceived as a threat by some traditional political reporters — but its model has lessons for all journalists.

 

Nate Silver’s FiveThiryEight blog at The New York Times really only does one thing: It makes election predictions. But it does this differently than pretty much everyone else, because it aggregates all available polls using a statistical model calibrated with past election data. He has his critics among the political class, but to my eye, it makes pretty much all other election “horse race” coverage look primitive and uninformed.

 

FiveThirtyEight has obvious lessons for journalism about data-related topics such as statistics and uncertainty. But I think I also see wider implications for the evolving role of the political journalist. At heart, these changes are about the response of journalism to a world that is increasingly complex and networked....

 

[Thoughtful reading on journalism ~ Jeff]

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People still like to read, argues Economist editor-in-chief John Micklethwait | Lean Back 2.0

People still like to read, argues Economist editor-in-chief John Micklethwait | Lean Back 2.0 | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Last week, John Micklethwait, editor-in-chief of The Economist, spoke on NPR’s “The Diane Rehm Show”, along with Stephen Shepard, dean of the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate School of Journalism and former senior editor at Newsweek and BusinessWeek. Given the recent announcement by Newsweek and the difficulties most print publishers are going through, both discussed the future of news magazines in this digital age.

 

Here are some highlights from the interview....

 

[Great discussion on news trends and the future of news ~ Jeff]

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A journalist's guide to verifying images | IJNet

A journalist's guide to verifying images | IJNet | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Breaking news sometimes brings out people who want to fool the public with doctored images, so every journalist should know how to verify the authenticity of photos and videos.

 

Enter digital journalists Mandy Jenkins and Craig Silverman, who are perfecting the art of online verification.

 

Jenkins, social news editor for the Huffington Post, and Silverman, editorial director of OpenFile.ca and editor and author of Regret the Error, shared their advice during their presentation, "B.S. Detection for Journalists," at the recent 2011 Online News Association Conference in Boston.

 

Here are their tips for verifying images...

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