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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach <a href="<a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a>" rel="nofollow"><a href="http://www.theprcoach.com" rel="nofollow">http://www.theprcoach.com</a></a>
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Conversation Agent - Valeria Maltoni: Lessons Learned Edition

Conversation Agent - Valeria Maltoni: Lessons Learned Edition | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Valeria Maltoni shares six valuable business lessons. It's a thoughtful read!

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This So-Called Digital Life: Re-Evaluating the Value of Social Media - Brian Solis

This So-Called Digital Life: Re-Evaluating the Value of Social Media - Brian Solis | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

...I often feel alone when I’m not connected or that I’m missing out when I read the updates of my friends. It makes me rethink my priorities in ways that wouldn’t be the most productive…at least by yesterday’s standards. Should I have joined them? Maybe getting out would be just what I needed. Again, I know I’m not alone.


I’m not addicted. I’m not in need of a digital intervention or digital detox. I intentionally live this connected lifestyle because I find value more times than not. It’s a choice. But, still I wonder. I wonder if the value I get out of my interaction across a dizzying array of networks is right or simply right in the absence of discovering alternative value or utility....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Really thoughtful post from Brian Solis as he explores the need for balance in a digital universe.

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Covering Wicked Problems » Pressthink | Jay Rosen

I think every writer, every journalist, every scholar, should tell you where he’s coming from before he tells you what he knows. I am not a science journalist, or a science blogger, or a scientist who writes. But I am interested in your world, and I try to follow developments in it. My field of study is what I call “pressthink,” which is sort of like groupthink– but for people in journalism. Lately I have been fixated on the problems of the press as it tries to adapt to the digital world. So that’s what I do. But it’s not where I’m coming from....

 

And that’s what I have for you today: a really juicy puzzle. It begins with a distinction that I have found useful. The distinction is between tame and wicked problems. Now given what’s happened to science writer Jonah Lehrer lately I should tell you that I’ve written about this issue before and since I said it about as well as I could say it then, I am going to say it in a similar way again… okay?...

 

Wicked problems have these features: It is hard to say what the problem is, to define it clearly or to tell where it stops and starts. There is no “right” way to view the problem, no definitive formulation. There are many stakeholders, all with their own frames, which they tend to see as exclusively correct. Ask what the problem is and you will get a different answer from each. Someone can always say that the problem is just a symptom of another problem and that someone will not be wrong. The problem is inter-connected to a lot of other problems; pulling them apart is almost impossible. In a word: it’s a mess....

 

[Jay Rosen tackles "wicked problems" delightfully - JD ]

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This is how Google is killing the Web

On our Desktops & Smart-devices, everything is just one touch away. So why on the browser do we solely rely on Search?


The browser experience is deliberately forcing us into searching  everything. These browsers make most of their profit by keeping this experience alive. So, who cares? The ones who care are the millions of startups, businesses and content providers out there, trying to get the world’s attention.Apple, Google & Microsoft built amazing app stores for mobile and desktop. They made it as simple as possible for their users to access these products. However, on the Web, they don’t have control over what we are doing. So they provide us with a lousy experience.  Forcing the user to only a handful of websites that he can remember by heart....

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In this thoughtful post, Roy Pessis searches for answers on search and how it could be so much better. Enjoyable reading.

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Multitasking » Online College

Multitasking » Online College | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Everybody multitasks, but what most people don’t realize is that, in fact, multitasking doesn’t work. Studies show that only about 2% of people are capable of effectively multitasking, but that doesn’t stop the remaining 98% of people from trying. And with today’s technology, everyone multitasks more than ever—from using smartphones in class to tablets while watching television, there are always multiple things to be doing at one time.

 

While multitasking may make you feel like you’re accomplishing more things in less time, in actuality trying to multitask does more harm than good: It reduces productivity, and even lowers your IQ. Things like texting while studying or watching TV while working on a paper can have a huge effect on your academic success, so next time you’re tempted to multitask while doing schoolwork, remember that if you really want to get something done right, multitasking is probably not your best route....

 

[Geez, I guess Mom was right. Pay attention! - JD]

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Doc Searls Weblog · Table for two

The Web as we know it today was two years old in June 1997, when the page below went up. It lasted, according to Archive.org, until October 2010. When I ran across it back then, it blew my mind — especially the passage I have boldfaced in the long paragraph near the end.

 

The Internet is a table for two. Any two, anywhere. All attempts to restrict it and lock it down will fail to alter the base fact that the Net’s protocols are designed to eliminate the functional distance, as far as possible, between any two points, any two devices, any two people. This is the design principle for a World of Ends. That last link goes to a piece David Weinberger and I wrote in 2003, to as little effect, I suspect, as @Man’s piece had in 1997. I doubt any of the three of us would write the same things the same ways today. But the base principle, that table-for-two-ness, is something I believe all of us respect. It won’t go away. That’s why I thought it best to disinter @Man’s original and run it again here....

 

[Always thought-provoking Doc Searls - JD]

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