Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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How Twitter, Facebook Live and Genius Transformed Convention Coverage - MediaShift

How Twitter, Facebook Live and Genius Transformed Convention Coverage - MediaShift | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

During the 2012 election, the Washington Post’s political editor Rebecca Sinderbrand sent out only a handful of tweets each day. This year, however, the paper has an entire social media team, sending out about five tweets per hour, not including a separate account dedicated solely to politics.


"We can’t do our jobs without having access — in particular to Twitter — but other platforms as well,” she said. “That really started to happen in 2012.”


At the Republican National Convention, the Post’s social media team used Twitter, as well as Snapchat, Facebook and Facebook Live.This cycle is all about storytelling on multiple platforms and connecting those platforms. Take, for instance, a Facebook Live video Sinderbrand did with Robert Costa, the national political reporter with the Washington Post. The video appeared on Facebook, but was also tweeted along with tags to their respective Facebook pages....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

How social media is changing journalism and especially live convention coverage.

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6 reasons why newspapers have dropped their paywalls

6 reasons why newspapers have dropped their paywalls | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

WBetween 1999 and May 2015, newspapers eliminated their paywalls 69 times, according to a study out this week by University of Southern California professor Mike Ananny and USC Ph.D. candidate Leila Bighash. (The authors say they came to this figure by finding public mentions of the decisions to drop paywalls, so they admit that their analysis could miss some of the times newspapers changed how they charge for online access.)


The decision to drop a paywall can provide insight into how a news organization’s “values intersect with its commodification strategy, its technology design, and its brand identity” as outlets of all stripes are still deciding how much their reporting should cost:


Whatever the motivations and mechanisms, when news organizations drop, suspend, or otherwise open up their paywalls, they change the commodification of online news. Content that was previously considered valuable enough to charge for becomes free because, for the different reasons described here, news organizations think it should circulate freely. The commercial press sometimes, briefly, looks similar to a public service broadcaster, providing access to all (albeit still with advertising).


Of the 69 instances paywalls were dropped or eliminated, there were 41 times that news outlets dropped them only temporarily; the other 28 times, papers made the decision to permanently reduce or eliminate them. Ananny and Bighash were able to categorize these changes in paywall strategy into six different scenarios.Here are the reasons why publishers drop their paywalls, according to the study....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Sometimes it's a response to a public emergency; sometimes it's just to build audience. Interesting study.

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The Inside Story of the Politico Break-Up

The Inside Story of the Politico Break-Up | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

It was early evening in Politico’s newsroom, four days before the Iowa caucuses.


Reporters were working sources and checking TV screens as a presidential debate was about to get under way. But tonight, January 28, Politico’s biggest story was about itself.


Outside news organizations were reporting a massive, unexpected overhaul of the company’s leadership. Now executives were scrambling to respond. In a glass-enclosed office at the far end of the newsroom, CEO Jim VandeHei was hunkered down alongside chief operating officer Kim Kingsley and chief revenue officer Roy Schwartz, hurriedly crafting a statement announcing that they—along with marquee reporter Mike Allen—were leaving the company.


After months of behind-the-scenes drama, Washington’s most successful media partnership in a generation was busting apart. And all the players had to get their stories straight....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The team that built DC's most unconventional modern media juggernaut is divorcing, thanks largely to the most conventional reasons: ego, power, and money.

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Pew: Most news sharing remains low-tech, offline

Pew: Most news sharing remains low-tech, offline | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The Pew Research Center’s latest report supports much of what we already know about news media: Print is dying, digital is growing, and the future lies with mobile. What stand out are the findings about our news sharing habits, which suggest that sharing overwhelmingly remains a low-tech, offline activity.


Despite huge growth in the use of social networks, 85 percent of US adults still prefer to share news by word of mouth rather than digitally, according to Pew. That’s not surprising if the news comes from a traditional medium, such as newspapers or TV, but even consumers who primarily got their news online were nearly three times more likely to share the news verbally than to post on social media, according to the report.In fact, active engagement with news on social media is relatively low in general.


The proportion of people who often liked, commented, posted, and shared news was less than 16 percent, while those who did it only sometimes accounted for less than half of those surveyed. Interestingly, although young people are more likely to get their news online, they are no more likely to engage with news online than older people; indeed, Pew found that people over 50 were most likely to comment on news posts. That could be because young adults are less interested in news than their elders and discuss news at lower rates....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

It's a mobile world and the news business is no different.

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Working With the 'Frenemy': Publishers Both Optimistic and Cautious With Social Platforms - MediaShift

Working With the 'Frenemy': Publishers Both Optimistic and Cautious With Social Platforms - MediaShift | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Newsrooms are posting more of their content directly to social media platforms, but with little idea of what the rewards will be.
That insight comes from data presented by researchers at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University last week at a half-day event, “Digital News in a Distributed Environment.”

 

Researchers surveyed more than 40 journalists and news media executives, from both national and local brands, as well as eight executives from Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google and Snapchat. They also held a roundtable attended by fifteen social media and audience editors.

 

They found that a publisher’s business model is what determines its social media strategy – and no one solution works, said Claire Wardle, the research director at the Tow Center. While some publishers are optimistic about the new opportunities that social media provides, others feel powerless. And relationships between publishers and platforms are not always amicable, with one respondent referring to a platform as a “frenemy.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

traditional news media are still trying to figure note the benefits of social media.

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5 Key Findings, 20 Essential Stats: Inside 2016’s Digital News Report - MediaShift

5 Key Findings, 20 Essential Stats: Inside 2016’s Digital News Report - MediaShift | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

“We really hit a landmark this year,” Newman told the audience, highlighting how – for the first time – more than half of the DNR sample now uses social media for news each week. In tracking this trend, we’ve seen “enormous growth in most markets since 2013,” he added.

 

Key stats:

  • 51% use social media for news each week.
  • 12% say social media is their main news source.
  • More 18-24s now prefer social media (28%), as a news source, to TV news (24%).
  • 44% of the DNR sample uses Facebook for news each week.

 

Facebook’s news reach is more than double its nearest rival, You Tube (19%), although the video network plays a prominent news role in some countries. Twitter (10%) meanwhile has an impact due to its popularity with heavy news users and influencers....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Very interesting report from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

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Jochen Burkhard's curator insight, June 21, 12:38 AM
The end of news services as we know them.
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How CNNs Spanish Site Reaches Its Global Audience Online

How CNNs Spanish Site Reaches Its Global Audience Online | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Juan Andres Muñoz was in his bedroom when he first tweeted news of Osama Bin Laden’s death to hundreds of thousands of followers of CNN’s Spanish language network, CNN en Español.“


I remember I was at home, and back at that time we didn’t have a lot of people working on social – I was doing a lot of the tweeting myself. I saw emails coming in, and everything indicated that it would be a big big story. As soon as it was confirmed by CNN, I tweeted immediately from the main CNN en Español account.“


I tweeted that from my room. It went all around the Spanish-speaking world, and ended up being one of the three biggest breaking news tweets on the event.”


That experience confirmed to Juan just how effective social media could be in spreading news and information....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

News Whip talked to the Head of Social Media and Digital at CNN's Spanish language network about reaching readers effectively around the Spanish-speaking world. His advice to journalists is equally valuable for bloggers.

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Answer the f**king question!

Reporter Jonathan Pie thinks politicians should just answer the fucking question. To use this video in a commercial player or in broadcasts, please emai

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Always-funny, pseudo-reporter Jonathan Pie goes ballistic about British politicians who don't answer questions without a sound bite. I'd love to see him go after Trump.

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Might a messaging app be in your news future? Three now in use | Knight Digital Media Center

Might a messaging app be in your news future? Three now in use | Knight Digital Media Center | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

With a rapid rise in messaging apps that nearly rivals social media use, apps could become prospective content distributors for publishers. Easier said than done because most apps were not conceived with content distribution in mind, according to NewsWhip.

“The majority of people don’t sign up to get news pushed at them; they sign up to talk with their friends. That remains the case, and publishers looking to experiment with any messaging app should be aware of the pitfalls of applying a blanket strategy. Patience and creativity is needed,“ writes Liam Corcoran of NewsWhip.  

Corcoran cites three examples of mobile apps recently used by publishers....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Will you get your news I am in the future? Probably.

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