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Out of Eden Walk, a seven-year project by reporter and National Geographic Fellow Paul Salopek, will experiment with new digital storytelling techniques and share lessons to help advance the field ...

Out of Eden Walk, a seven-year project by reporter and National Geographic Fellow Paul Salopek, will experiment with new digital storytelling techniques and share lessons to help advance the field ... | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON, DC – Jan. 13, 2015 – Out of Eden Walk, a seven-year project by reporter and National Geographic Fellow Paul Salopek, will experiment with new digital storytelling techniques and share lessons to help advance the field of journalism....


Out of Eden launched in January of 2013 in Ethiopia, when Salopek, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, began an epic journey to retrace on foot and with minimal logistical support the path of early human migration, covering 21,000 miles. Since then, Salopek has connected with wide audiences and generated a huge social media following as well as dedicated supporters. More than 200 schools worldwide have signed up for Out of Eden Walk online curriculums....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Journalist and Pulitzer winner Paul Salopek to test new digital storytelling and audience engagement tools on seven-year journey around the world.

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Anthony Bourdain Has Become the Future of Cable News, and He Couldn't Care Less

Anthony Bourdain Has Become the Future of Cable News, and He Couldn't Care Less | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

A meal out with Bourdain typically involves three things. There will be engaging conversation, possibly touching on such subjects as the essays of Michel de Montaigne, 1920s surrealist films, and mixed-martial-arts combat. There will be booze, although perhaps in more modest quantities than his reputation suggests. And there will be food--some strange, all carefully prepared, and a certain amount involving animal innards that seem better suited to ninth-grade biology class than the dinner table.

Bourdain, 58, is a foodie explorer who has spent years trekking around the planet while fearlessly tucking into all manner of exotic fare, from months-old rotten shark meat in Iceland to a still-beating cobra heart in Vietnam. "He's the Indiana Jones of the food world," says his close friend Eric Ripert, chef and co-owner of New York institution Le Bernardin. "He is the smart guy who knows food and is going to take us with him on an adventure....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Interesting profile, good story and enjoyable read. 9/10

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(Re)defining multimedia journalism

(Re)defining multimedia journalism | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

New storytelling forms inspire us.


...We should not forget that producing multimedia content is as much about mindset as skills. Imitators of “Snow Fall” might mistakenly add bells and whistles that do nothing to enhance the story itself.


Multimedia storytelling continues to evolve as more journalists experiment with the possibilities opened up by new digital tools and techniques. I recommend three more recent examples that thrust the form in new and compelling directions...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good overview of trends in multimedia storytelling and multimedia journalism.

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False idol: The scrooge of digital correctness

False idol: The scrooge of digital correctness | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

For a Delacorte Lecture I gave in 2012, I described what I viewed as a headlong rush toward digital self-destruction in the publishing and journalism world.In some ways, things have only gotten worse. It is a frightening sign of the times that, to save money, New York magazine, an iconic weekly, has gone biweekly, and Ladies’ Home Journal, a monthly founded in 1883, has switched to quarterly publication. I am even more disturbed to learn that my old college paper, the Columbia Daily Spectator, wants to go to weekly publication and devote more energy to its so-called digital focus. Google continues its scorched-earth march through copyright territories once controlled by publishers and writers, while Amazon puts more bookstores out of business and buys The Washington Post. And then there’s the very well reported story in the March/April issue of the Columbia Journalism Review, “Who cares if it’s true?”

Jeff Domansky's insight:

John MacArthur, Publisher of Harper's, is not so optimistic about the value of digital journalism, pleading the case for old values and new.

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Can the New York Times kill its blogs without losing the soul of blogging in the process?

Can the New York Times kill its blogs without losing the soul of blogging in the process? | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
The New York Times has said it is planning to shut down or absorb as many as half of its existing blogs, with the hope that those skills can become more widespread inside the newspaper as a whole — but will they?
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Huh? Doesn't seem like a future-thinking digital strategy to me!

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State of the news media in 2014? The best of times and the worst of times

There are those who proclaim the rise of digital media is finally giving way to a “golden age of journalism.” And then there are the pessimists who see little but doom or gloom.


And, to be fair, there’s ample evidence for each view. Just check out the Pew Research Center’s 11th annual State of the News Media report that’s being issued today. This year’s study goes in-depth into the revenue picture for news, the rise of digital reporting and growth of digital video. In many ways, this is the best of times and the worst of times for the industry.


You can read the full report at the Pew website or check out a few handy charts here. Meanwhile here’s the speed-read version....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The new Pew report on the State of the News Media 2014 pinpoints the latest trends in Digital and traditional news media.

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Why live video won't save the news biz | Politico

Why live video won't save the news biz | Politico | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Last July, The Washington Post launched a live video channel that its president proclaimed would be “the ESPN of politics.”

Instead, PostTV turned out to be more like a public access show. Within five months, the live content had vanished and the “channel” became little more than a clearinghouse for pre-taped video packages and recycled press briefing footage, along with the occasional original report.


What the Post learned in its video flop in 2013 is what The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, POLITICO and other large news organizations had discovered in years prior: Creating quality live television is expensive — the Post invested millions of dollars and dozens of staffers to Post TV — and much harder than it looks. The end result didn’t interest readers — or advertisers....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Dylan Byers explores why live video won't save print.

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Why there's reason to be optimistic about journalism's future

Why there's reason to be optimistic about journalism's future | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Caroline Little, CEO CEO of the Newspaper Association of America (NAA), says despite what cynics say, the future of newspapers is bright. In an article published Friday, she shared some NAA research:


"Our audience has grown with the shifting digital landscape, and we’re seeing increased levels of audience engagement and new avenues of consumption. We made the first gain in circulation revenue since 2003, with revenue rising by 5 percent — from $10 billion to $10.5 billion — as digital subscriptions grew dramatically.


The number of unique visitors engaged with U.S. newspaper digital content hit a new high in September 2013, totaling 141 million adults — an impressive increase of 11 percent since just June. We’ve changed with the times to fit the needs of our audience, from print to website to tablet to mobile, adapting our content and strategies for delivery. And it’s working. Across all digital platforms, 71 percent of adults in this country engage with newspaper content, and 55 percent of those visitors consume newspaper content on mobile devices"....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

a few traditional media with deep pockets adapting but most are struggling to get digital. Changes to engage young readers including younger op ed writers and reporters is essential for the futurefuture.

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Celeste Côté's curator insight, January 5, 2014 6:32 PM

A refreshing smidgen of encouragement amidst all the despair I keep reading about...

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In defence of clickbait

In defence of clickbait | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Steve Hind: When readers are lured in and rewarded for their curiosity with good content, everyone wins. Sites like Buzzfeed use this to their advantage, and traditional media should take note..


.Last week the internet was treated to another great offering from Randall Munroe, author of the xkcd cartoon blog.


In it, Munroe re-imagined 20th century headlines if they were written to get more clicks. "This one weird mould kills all germs" could have applied to the discovery of penicillin in 1928. "You won't believe what these people did to the Berlin Wall" could have appeared in November 1989 for maximum effect.


His point, of course, was that the "clickbait-ification" of our news is cheapening it....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The fact is clickbait content marketing and news work. Here's the irony. In The Guardian news story about clickbait, is it clickbait in itself or is it a legitimate story first?

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Journalism and disruption: Change is easy and hard

Journalism and disruption: Change is easy and hard | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

... However, it would be a mistake to think that just because it’s easier than ever to produce amazing digital editorial experiences that this makes organisational change easy. It takes an entirely different set of skills to get buy-in from stakeholders or to Jedi mind trick the empire builders of senior management. It is hard, and even I underestimated the size and nature of the challenge as I transitioned from young digital maverick field journalist to digital editor in the middle of the last decade.


While a lot is different in 2013 than it was in 1996 when I started in digital journalism, or even than it was five or six years ago, change still is hard. In some ways, it is even harder now as most newspapers struggle with redeploying diminishing resources carefully from the core business to new digital initiatives. The politics are fierce. Even when it is in an organisation’s best interest, even when it is an organisation’s stated interest to embrace digital, winning the political and cultural battles is hard, thankless work. I know people who stayed and fought these battles inside organisations, and I have deep respect for them and learn from them whenever possible. When I return to working for an organisation, hopefully soon, I will take lessons that I’ve learned from these friends....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Thoughtful post on journalism and responding to change.

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Who’s Winning at Volume in Publishing

Who’s Winning at Volume in Publishing | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Winning in digital media now boils down to a simple equation: figure out a way to produce the most content at as low a cost as possible.


In recent years, new players like The Huffington Post burst onto the scene by pumping out a dizzying amount of content each day. The company has 532 full-time editorial staff producing about 1,200 pieces of content per day (and that’s not including the 28 full-time blog editors who oversee the 400 pieces of content per day coming from its blog). All this content generates 43 million pageviews per day, per Comscore. The pageview race now stretches far beyond HuffPost, as many publishers combat low ad prices with high volume.


Even old publications, like Forbes, are taking part in the pageview race. It has 50 on its editorial team. However, it also has about 1,000 contributors. Between the two, Forbes puts up about 400 posts per day and sees 4 million pageviews per day, per Comscore. The company doesn’t separate out how much the staff and contributors put out. But last year, the company posted its best financials since the 2008 industry collapse and saw digital ad revenue spike 19 percent year-over-year. Quantity pays the bills....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The numbers tell it all. Quantity over quality wins in digital media. That is, if your quality exceeds a base level. Very interesting data.

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Slow Journalism: Deep Storytelling in the Digital Age

Slow Journalism: Deep Storytelling in the Digital Age | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The fast pace of the modern lifestyle—born from high-speed, hand-held, wireless connectivity—has not only changed the way we send, receive, and consume information, but has transformed the way journalists operate. This has led some of them to make a concerted effort to slow down and take a different tack.

“Slow Journalism is deep journalism—journalism that is informed by deep immersion in the story at ground level,” explains National Geographic Fellow Paul Salopek.

Salopek is conducting an experiment in this modern expression of a timeless human pursuit. He’s engaging with major stories of our time at the natural speed of his own footsteps as he retraces our ancestors’ migration from Africa to South America with his Out of Eden Walk. Along the way he’s not just looking for the latest news updates, he’s revealing the texture of the lives of people he encounters: nomads, villagers, traders, farmers, and fisherman who live within front-page stories, but normally don’t make the news themselves.­...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Slow journalism is a concept that may be gaining ground with time pressed and overburdened readers.

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Caroline Andre's curator insight, January 23, 5:35 AM

In response to automated journalism : 

AI algorithms wil never be able to reach what we could call a deep journalism level

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Mark Little: ‘This is the Golden Age of Storytelling’ | Mediashift | PBS

Mark Little: ‘This is the Golden Age of Storytelling’ | Mediashift | PBS | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Attending a wedding in Ireland several years ago, Mark Little saw fellow guests looking at their phones, as they learned that Michael Jackson had died. Soon, the group was dancing to Thriller as a tribute to the late star. That dance, Little said, happened 15 minutes before the Los Angeles Times had even officially announced Jackson’s death. At that moment, he said he thought, “Wow, that’s the way news is being consumed.”


As the founder of Storyful — a global news agency that finds, collects, and verifies social-media content — Little has served as a leader of our massive information shift: How is news changing? How are stories changing? And what are the ethics involved as traditional media outlets transition from being the gatekeeper to being part of a worldwide reporting network in which every citizen can contribute to — or even completely tell — our world’s most important stories?...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Here's a thoughtful look at why stories still matter.

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Marco Favero's curator insight, September 23, 2014 3:52 PM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

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All you need to know about journalism: click here

All you need to know about journalism: click here | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

In the last few weeks the shooting down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, the Ukrainian crisis and the situation in the Gaza Strip are monopolizing media attention....


Last Wednesday the Twitter account of the Associated Press posted this tweet:

BREAKING: Dutch military plane carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash lands in Eindhoven.


The news was verified, the tweet was not wrong from a grammatical point of view, however there was an ambiguity whereby if the word 'crash' is read as a part of the verb 'crashland' rather than as a noun, the meaning becomes the plane which was carrying the bodies of the passengers of the MH17 had crashed. A little later, the account   clarified the misunderstanding, but the damage was done with the tweet wrongly interpreted and already shared by thousands of people,   sparking the most varied reactions.


The episode has prompted Megan Garber of The Atlantic to write a piece about the use of "breaking news" designation. According to Garber, it was not a necessary piece of news to add to many others re-launched as indispensable 'breaking news' (a plane has landed, after all: it is news in an article, in a context, but not breaking news itself). It is useless to engulf the news ecosystem. "The term 'breaking' is quickly losing its meaning," Garber explains, in agreement with what Felix Salmon stated during the last edition of the International Journalism Festival....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The global boom of fact-checking and other current journalism challenges is explored in this excellent post from the IJF.

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Forget ‘The Dark Side.’ Journalists Should Learn Marketing, Business Skills | Mediashift | PBS

Forget ‘The Dark Side.’ Journalists Should Learn Marketing, Business Skills | Mediashift | PBS | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When it comes to media work and the teaching of it, I loath the phrase, the dark side. It goes something like this: You teach journalism and PR in the same department? I stay away from the dark side.


Enough. Some journalists — and journalism educators — have an outsized ego about all things journalism and a palpable disdain for all things not. They made it a religion to ignore anything related to the business side in defense of the purity of news.


It was easy to be holier than thy marketer when some news organizations were turning year-over-year profits that would send drool down the chin of an oil and gas executive. Not today.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Journalism has some work to do to catch up to the realities of news and business today. Journalists simply need more skills.

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Screw innovation, the New York Times need to focus on TBD | memeburn

Screw innovation, the New York Times need to focus on TBD  | memeburn | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The New York Times Innovation Report has been ripped to  pieces by many brains in the media world but the issues are the familiar TBD framework I work with, namely Technology (can/does it do what is needed?), Behaviour (will people do what we need/want?) and Data (will enough people do what we need?).


After ploughing through it, despite a slightly depressing overtone, I am confident the New York Times will pull through…the industry can’t afford it not to (read: have an R&D budget). The very fact it is doing a report of this sort (especially considering who asked for it) means they are focusing and clear about their future problems – success therefore is predicated on hard decisions being made about some very core issues (staff etc).


A few things stood out when I read the report...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Paul Armstrong takes another look at NYT's "innovation" report.

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What the Fox Knows

What the Fox Knows | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

FiveThirtyEight is a data journalism organization. Let me explain what we mean by that, and why we think the intersection of data and journalism is so important.


If you’re a casual reader of FiveThirtyEight, you may associate us with election forecasting, and in particular with the 2012 presidential election, when our election model “called” 50 out of 50 states right.


Certainly we had a good night. But this was and remains a tremendously overrated accomplishment....


The other reason I say our election forecasts were overrated is because they didn’t represent the totality, or even the most important part, of our journalism at FiveThirtyEight. We also covered topics ranging from the increasing acceptance of gay marriage to the election of the new pope, along with subjects in sports, science, lifestyle and economics. Relatively little of this coverage entailed making predictions. Instead, it usually involved more preliminary steps in the data journalism process: collecting data, organizing data, exploring data for meaningful relationships, and so forth.


Data journalists have the potential to add value in each of these ways, just as other types of journalists can add value by gathering evidence and writing stories....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Here is Nate Silver's statement on the launch of data journalism's FiveThirtyEight. Lots of critics in the first several days but time will tell how it contributes to journalism and news trends.

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Why journalists drive scientists crazy, in graphs | Poynter.

Why journalists drive scientists crazy, in graphs | Poynter. | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Journalists have to simplify material for a general audience. Is there a technological fix?Scientists and the journalists who cover them are locked in an “eternal tug of war,” Sabine Hossenfelder writes. The journos feel they have to elide detail so a general audience can read them. The scientists feel the resulting “knowledge transfer” to readers is pitifully low. Hossenfelder illustrates the problem with a series of graphs, like this one...
Jeff Domansky's insight:
Intriguing post and possibilities for improving journalism.
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NYT Columnist Proves (Again) Op-Eds Are Out Of Touch With Society

NYT Columnist Proves (Again) Op-Eds Are Out Of Touch With Society | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
I love the NYT, it has always been one of my favorite publications I've read daily since I was a kid. However this opinion piece on marijuana reform is without question the single worst thing I think I've ever read on the site.


...Clearly many of these people are  out of touch with our culture. Opinions of those stuck in their ways, afraid of change and in no way reflecting reality. But it isn’t just age. You can be old and informed on issues and present a balanced opinion.


This is another reason many bloggers have risen so quickly: their words resonate with what’s actually going on. If you have opinions, it’s still a huge opportunity for you to balance those from an alarmist, afraid, homophobic, intolerant and increasingly irrelevant era.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Adam Singer, rightfully, points to the problem of old, out-of-touch op-ed columnists with traditional media. No wonder they're losing audience and advertisers!

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WashTimes Writer Miller Notes Media 'Obsessed' with Linking AR-15 to Navy Yard Murders | NewsBusters

WashTimes Writer Miller Notes Media 'Obsessed' with Linking AR-15 to Navy Yard Murders | NewsBusters | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Previous NewsBusters posts (here and here) have noted how Piers Morgan promoted the idea that Alexis bought and used an AR-15 in the Navy Yard killings, even though his own network CNN ultimately reported that Alexis did neither. Michelle Malkin's Twitchy.com notes that several of Morgan's tweets concerning his AR-15 claims have been sent down the memory hole....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Truth is also the victim in the stories about the DC killings as media rushed to get the story first....

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NY Times’ Abramson: ‘Long-form narrative is not only alive but dancing to new music’ | Poynter.

Forget the digital doomsayers, said Jill Abramson. “Long-form narrative is not only alive but dancing to new music.”Other prominent journalists echoed The New York Times managing editor’s optimism about thriving in a Twitter age at Boston University’s annual narrative journalism conference last weekend.Abramson said devices like tablets and iPads give long-form narrative new ways to reach new audiences.


She said her paper focuses on integrated storytelling in series like “A Year At War,” with multimedia “freshening” the story by letting readers “see, feel and almost taste” soldiers’ and families’ experiences.She added that new tools can’t trump journalism basics. Wary of “narrow specialists,” she worries that journalism schools’ new technology training may detract from traditional shoe leather reporting values....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Storytelling still matters in journalism, especially in longform ...

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Student: I want to tell the truth about journalism that nobody wants to say | Poynter.

...All of that stuff is on us, the journalists. It’s our fault. Our job was to report the news, and we did that. But we got complacent, and we stopped evolving, and soon the concept of a news article became far removed from what you, as a person, valued. Now we find ourselves in an awkward position where an indispensable component of democracy is slipping away, and we’re scrambling....

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