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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
PR insight, social media & thought leadership - from The PR Coach www.theprcoach.com
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The Philosophy of Creativity

The Philosophy of Creativity | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
This collection of new essays on creativity integrates philosophical insights with empirical research.


...There is little that shapes the human experience as profoundly and pervasively as creativity. Creativity drives progress in every human endeavor, from the arts to the sciences, business, and technology. We celebrate and honor people for their creativity, identifying eminent individuals, as well as entire cultures and societies, in terms of their creative achievements. Creativity is the vehicle of self-expression and part of what makes us who we are. One might therefore expect creativity to be a major topic in philosophy, especially since it raises such a wealth of interesting philosophical questions, as we will soon see. Curiously, it isn’t....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

you can read this great collection of essays on creativity but make sure that you simply go out and be creative afterwards.

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Leonardo da Vinci's resume

Leonardo da Vinci's resume | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

When he was around 32 years old, Leonardo da Vinci applied to the Duke of Milan, Ludovico Sforza, for a job. The duke was in need of military expertise andLeonardo's 10-point CV emphasized his military engineering skills....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Jason Kottke shares this fun post about Leonardo da Vinci's resume with a twist at the end.

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The economics of The Simpsons

The economics of The Simpsons | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Homer Economicus is a new book which uses the fictional world of Springfield on The Simpsons to explain the basic concepts of economics.


Since The Simpsons centers on the daily lives of the Simpson family and its colorful neighbors, three opening chapters focus on individual behavior and decision-making, introducing readers to the economic way of thinking about the world. Part II guides readers through six chapters on money, markets, and government. A third and final section discusses timely topics in applied microeconomics, including immigration, gambling, and health care as seen in The Simpsons....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Doh! Where was this book when I was laboring through economics class in university?

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Christine Smallwood: Phyllis Rose’s “The Shelf: From LEQ to LES” | The New Yorker

Christine Smallwood: Phyllis Rose’s “The Shelf: From LEQ to LES” | The New Yorker | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
In a new subgenre of books about books, authors undertake reading stunts to prove that reading still matters. In “The Shelf,” Phyllis Rose reads through a more or less random shelf of library books. She compares her voyage to Ernest Shackleton’s explorations in the Antarctic.


...The number of Americans who read books has been declining for thirty years, and those who do read have become proud of, even a bit overidentified with, the enterprise. Alongside the tote bags you can find T-shirts, magnets, and buttons emblazoned with covers of classic novels; the Web site Etsy sells tights printed with poems by Emily Dickinson. A spread in The Paris Review featured literature-inspired paint-chip colors (a charcoal Funeral Suit for “The Loser; a mossy “Graham Greene”).


The merchandising of reading has a curiously undifferentiated flavor, as if what you read mattered less than that you read. In this climate of embattled bibliophilia, a new subgenre of books about books has emerged, a mix of literary criticism, autobiography, self-help, and immersion journalism: authors undertake reading stunts to prove that reading—anything—still matters.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Stay tuned, for stunt reading.

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Waiting for the Internet’s ‘Mad as Hell’ Moment | Medium

Waiting for the Internet’s ‘Mad as Hell’ Moment | Medium | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Now that TV is the place for serious people with long attention spans, we’re really in trouble


...Allow me to paraphrase. Back in the day, the powers that be had an imperfect but workable recipe for turning our brains in to nice steaming bowls of beef stew using television. But some people saw through that plan. Today, TV is really just as dumb as ever, but it is out-dumbed by the internet. When these two forces work together… Ding! Stew’s ready....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Drew Reed writes a thoughful and delightful essay on Medium.

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The Problem With This Magazine Cover

The Problem With This Magazine Cover | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Ethical journalism is all about not being inconsiderate, insensitive and immoral....


A state of incredulity took over me as I viewed this disgraceful work, glorifying the man who made a tragic mark on the lives of so many Bostonians. While the citizens of Boston are definitely Boston Strong, the city still feels the aftermath of this event every day....


When the picture was released on the magazine's Facebook page, comments started pouring in attacking the decision to highlight a bombing suspect like he was a rock star. Among the remarks were comments on how long time subscribers were planning to unsubscribe, and a Do Something petition to have this cover replaced....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Teen writer's impressive critique of Rolling Stone and media. Recommended reading!

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