Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Social media, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Skittles Responds Tersely to Donald Trump Jr.'s Tweet Likening Refugees to Candy

Skittles Responds Tersely to Donald Trump Jr.'s Tweet Likening Refugees to Candy | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Skittles has responded with uncharacteristic yet appropriate seriousness after being dragged into the presidential race by Donald Trump Jr., son of the Republican nominee, who posted a controversial tweet on Monday with an analogy about Skittles and refugees.

 

Here is Donald Trump Jr.'s tweet...

 

Within hours, Denise Young, vp of corporate affairs at Skittles parent Wrigley Americas, responded with a tersely word statement.

 

"Skittles are candy. Refugees are people," she said. "We don't feel it's an appropriate analogy. We will respectfully refrain from further commentary as anything we say could be misinterpreted as marketing."...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Well. handled by Skittles and PR fail by Jr.

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Ryan Lochte Inks Endorsement Deal With Pine Bros. Throat Drops

Ryan Lochte Inks Endorsement Deal With Pine Bros. Throat Drops | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Olympian Ryan Lochte, who was dropped this week by major sponsors including Speedo and Ralph Lauren, has found a brand willing to take him on. Pine Bros. Softish Throat Drops signed an endorsement deal today with Lochte, who will appear in commercial and print ads for the brand.


The swimmer thanked the company in a tweet today.


Lochte embellished the story of what he claimed was a robbery at gunpoint with fellow swimmers at a gas station in Rio de Janeiro during the Olympics earlier this month, lying about it to NBC's Billy Bush and Matt Lauer (and inspiring some shade from the likes of Al Roker, Stephen Colbert and John Oliver, who all called him out for his behavior). Lochte apologized to Lauer in an interview that aired on the Today Show on Monday, saying that he "over-exaggerated" the events of that night.


Lochte's ads for Pine Bros. will feature the tagline, "Pine Brothers Softish Throat Drops: Forgiving On Your Throat," just as the company—and Lochte, himself —is asking the public to forgive him. ...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Disgraced Olympian Ryan Lochte, who was dropped this week by major sponsors including Speedo and Ralph Lauren, has found a brand willing to take him on. Pine Bros.

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Why Trump's spokeswoman wore a necklace made of bullets on TV

Why Trump's spokeswoman wore a necklace made of bullets on TV | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it
Donald Trump's national spokeswoman Katrina Pierson explains why she wore a necklace made of bullets on live television.
Jeff Domansky's insight:

In the light of all of the gun violence in the US, this clip is a sad reflection of insensitivity, disregard for victims of violence, self-centeredness and shallow thinking by Trump's spokesperson. Typical.

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Amazon’s ‘cereal killer’ tweet provokes backlash after Sunday’s mass shooting

Amazon’s ‘cereal killer’ tweet provokes backlash after Sunday’s mass shooting | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Amazon.com Inc. is facing digital backlash following a tweet that was posted just hours after 49 people were killed and more than 50 others injured inside Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla.


Amazon, No. 1 in the Internet Retailer 2016 Top 500 Guide, posted a tweet of a ceramic bowl with the words “cereal killer” and a red splatter pattern that resembles  bloodstains on it, along with “#Guilty” and a link where shoppers could buy the product. The tweet, time-stamped at 10 a.m. Central on Sunday, was posted as U.S. consumers were learning about the mass shooting in Orlando and as details about the attack and the victims were trickling out.


The tweet remained online for about an hour before it became unavailable, and that was plenty of time to draw reaction from Twitter users who called the tweet “offensive” and “insensitive” and said it was poorly timed.


The bowl, made by Ohio-based crafts manufacturer Dab-A-Do’s Ceramics, is no longer for sale on Amazon’s site, though it’s unclear as to whether Amazon or Dab-A-Do’s pulled the product. Dab-A-Do’s still had the bowl on its website for $25....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Analysts say retailers need to pay attention to current events at all times to make sure their content doesn't come off as insensitive. Careful with your auto tweets.

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Tribune Publishing, now ‘tronc,’ issues worst press release in the history of journalism

Tribune Publishing, now ‘tronc,’ issues worst press release in the history of journalism | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

It has been a tense spring in the realm of big-time newspaper consolidation. Back in April, Gannett, owner of more than 100 newspapers across the country, including the flagship USA Today, made a roughly $400 million takeover bid for the Tribune Publishing, owner of the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, Baltimore Sun and several other titles.


The intervening weeks have seen a great deal of maneuvering by Tribune Chairman Michael Ferro to rebuff the bid, an effort that advanced Thursday with the news that Gannett may be backing off its bid in light of “expectations” that Tribune shareholders would back management in a critical vote.


[VIDEO: Tribune rejects Gannett’s bid again]


Amid all this business, the Tribune lost its mind, in a press release. First, it renamed and rebranded itself:


On June 20, we'll be tronc. Yep. tronc. pic.twitter.com/PvK8jtrQbp— Michael Zajakowski (@zajakowski) June 2, 2016


“Tronc” stands for “Tribune online content,” or, as this tronc press release renders it in smaller case: “tribune online content.” So obsessed is the new, rebranded company with the Web’s lower-case vibe that its press release starts various sentences that way. ...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Buzzwords and lower-case letters abound. Hope for the survival of the entity formerly known as the Chicago Tribune? Not so much. And the news release? One of the worst examples of baffling, befuddling, techno-speak-filled, corporate jargon laden press release ever seen. And I've seen a lot of them.

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Venerable Tribune Publishing, now "tronc," spews techno-drivel - without bullshit

Venerable Tribune Publishing, now "tronc," spews techno-drivel - without bullshit | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

Yesterday, Tribune Publishing, purveyor of news since 1847, changed its name to “tronc” (short for “Tribune Online Content.”) It’s now a “content curation and monetization company” — a company that makes money from content, what we used to call a media company. Today, I deconstruct the rest of its attempt to use techno-drivel to misdirect our attention from its problems.


Crisis-tossed Tribune Publishing, which owns the Chicago Tribune, the LA Times, and dozens of other papers, has suffered through a sale to a billionaire, a bankruptcy, a corporate split, newsroom turmoil, massive layoffs, and an unsolicited takeover offer. Now, as “tronc,” the company wants to be considered alongside Silicon Valley startups. (If this trend catches on, will the Boston Globe company become “hubstuff” and the New York Times “gray_lady”?)


The tronc press release is a classic, because it reveals that when a media company wants to reinvent itself as a technology company, it drapes its press release in the same techno-drivel that tech companies use. Instead of meaningless media and corporate bullshit, we get meaningless, shiny Silicon Valley bullshit.


It’s a transformation (you can tell because the release mentions “transform” or “transformation” six times).In the commentary below, I’ve added bold to indicate passives, meaningless superlatives, and especially, new-age jargon. I add commentary in brackets and commonsense translations below each section....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

tronc - the self-proclaimed, high-tech, low touch reinvention of Tribune publishing is a silly name that tries to deflect from all of its problems according to Josh Bernoff. The news release is a classic PR fail for this sudden rebirth as a "content curation and monetization company”.

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Suing for a Good Review: Using Twibel to Manage Online Image | Institute for Public Relations

Suing for a Good Review: Using Twibel to Manage Online Image | Institute for Public Relations | Public Relations & Social Media Insight | Scoop.it

The old adage that “perception is reality” is particularly true in online reputation management.  Practitioners know that what’s said online, true or not, frequently influences the public’s perception of their client.  Online image cultivation and maintenance has become part of almost all public relations practice, and practitioners continually strive to keep up with what people think about their client.


However, despite ever-increasing PR research sophistication, the core tenet of image management stays the same:  a practitioner must know and understand what others are saying about their client.  Handling criticisms is part of any good PR practice, and those teaching PR tell students how a practitioner responds to criticism is important because it can help foster a relationship with an aggrieved public. 


However, there is a trend in image management that turns this philosophy on its head.  In the past few years individuals and, increasingly, organizations have turned away from the PR practitioner and embraced the lawsuit as the most effective means to control, maintain, and cultivate online image....


These cases demonstrate a problematic trend in online image management.  While some defamation lawsuits are probably necessary, the expense of lawsuits and the potential for negative media attention are liabilities for any person or organization.  The use of non-disparagement clauses in contracts is equally problematic because it allows organizations to squelch criticisms rather than engage with critics.  Because of this, PR practitioners need to know four things when dealing with online defamation issues:...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Online reputation management by lawsuit and contract is a worrying trend in business and certainly is not sound PR practice.