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Public culture as professional science: final report of the ScoPE project

Public culture as professional science: final report of the ScoPE project | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

Public culture as professional science


The findings of the ScoPE project confirm the significance of a major shift or ‘sea change’ in professional scientific culture toward an endorsement of, and participation in, public engagement as a key component of scientific research and innovation. More firmly than in the past, public engagement emerges from the interview data as a matter of professional scientific commitment and as a valuable part of the everyday practice of professional science. Indeed, on the basis of the ScoPE interviews, public engagement skills are increasingly seen by scientists to be as important to a successful scientific career as scientific, clinical and teaching skills.

 

...

 

knowledgeable and capable public, in both specific and general contexts, and were depicted as active knowledge-seekers who could improve the professional practice of medical scientists through dialogue such as that undertaken at the clinical interface.

 

Full report here: http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/20016/1/ScoPE_report_-_09_10_09_FINAL.pdf ;

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What do practising research scientists get out of doing public engagement?
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Framing the big picture: going round in circles | Global Food Security blog

Framing the big picture: going round in circles | Global Food Security blog | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

 GFS Champion Tim Benton explains how engaging with people has shifted his views.

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Scientists’ dreams: a society supporting science and respecting its autonomy | Euroscientist Webzine

Scientists’ dreams: a society supporting science and respecting its autonomy | Euroscientist Webzine | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

Summary of reseach into scientists' attitudes to science communication and public enagement around the globe

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Feature podcast: when scientists meet the public - Speaking of Science

Feature podcast: when scientists meet the public - Speaking of Science | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

"...What I found was that both groups (scientists and patients), benefited from this event. The patients got a glimpse of what goes on behind closed doors, how the scientists do their work, what it is they are focusing on. The scientists got to hear the patient stories, and benefited from the amazement that the patients had in their skills and abilities."

 
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Breeding better beer - Feature

Breeding better beer - Feature | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it
Brewing-enthusiast Dr Chris Ridout had little idea when he applied for a BBSRC public engagement grant in 2001 that it might lead him to resurrect a Victorian beer.
Patrick Middleton's insight:

Dr Ridout said: "I've always been quite keen on public engagement and it's something I've tried to do.

"Even at the start of the project I thought something interesting might come out of it but I didn't know what or how.

"It's very surprising. The way things have turned out, it's really quite exciting. "

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Going Public: Professor Stephen Curry on blogging as an academic

Going Public: Professor Stephen Curry on blogging as an academic | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

Structural biologist Stephen Curry reveals how plugging himself into the public domain has added new perspectives to his research and teaching.

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Twitter / alicebell : Great @bigideas! Also good ...

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Scientists who engage with society perform better academically

"We find that, contrary to what is often suggested, scientists active in dissemination are also more active academically. However, their dissemination activities have almost no impact (positive or negative) on their career."

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What Purposeful Public Engagement Means for Archaeology

What Purposeful Public Engagement Means for Archaeology | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

"...There are, of course, notable exceptions to learn from in our quest to meaningfully improve our public engagement. One such example is the California Gold Rush shipwreck Frolic, lost along the rugged northern California coast in 1849..."

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‘Oh yes, robots! People like robots; the robot people should do something’: perspectives and prospects in public engagement with robotics

‘Oh yes, robots! People like robots; the robot people should do something’: perspectives and prospects in public engagement with robotics | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

This paper covers a lot of ground including the benefits (and constraints) of public engagement, e.g.:

 

"I have personally found that a lot of times, that good questions that you get from people outside your own field can really make you examine some of your assumptions…it’s regions that you wouldn’t have explored intellectually because of your sort of academic history."

 

Thanks Emily Dawson for highlighting this

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David Goulson - BBSRC Social Innovator of the Year 2010

David Goulson - BBSRC Social Innovator of the Year 2010 | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

"Stirling University's Professor David Goulson was the winner of Social Innovator of the Year award. His innovation was increasing the impact of his academic work by founding of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust.

 

Goulson says that the Bumblebee Conservation Trust came out of frustration that scientific research, even when published in the best journals, is very often only read by other scientists, not by people who might put this knowledge into practice. "You can publish experiments in high quality journals again and again but they are only read by a few dozen scientists who work in your field. It achieves little or nothing in the real world"

 

"I do think there's a general problem in the UK, and perhaps elsewhere, that there is no obvious mechanism for scientists to translate applied research to get it to policy makers and the general public and so on," he says, citing three extinctions from Britain's 25 bumblebee species as a reason for immediate action. "For bumblebees, we now understand enough about them to have a pretty good idea how to conserve them, but we need to get that knowledge put into practise."

 

That is where the Bumblebee Conservation Trust comes in. The formal aims of the trust are to conserve bumblebee populations, prevent species extinctions, and promote conservation of bees and wider biodiversity to the public. "Bumblebees pollinate crops which we need to eat. It's really easy to explain the importance of bumblebees to people with no interest in biodiversity or polar bears or pandas," says Goulson. "Without bees food would be more expensive, and there would be less of it and less variety. For economic reasons alone it's worth doing without all the other reasons.""

 

Thanks to Wendy Barnaby for highlighting this

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Manchester Beacon Final Evaluation

Manchester Beacon Final Evaluation | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

This page has some short audio from Professor Nancy Rothwell and Dr Erinma Ochu reflecting on the Manchester Beacon for Public Engagement and touching on some of the benefits of public engagement - skills, new knowledge, the potnetial to be promoted for doing public engagement.

 

Thanks to @erinmaochu for this

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Community engagement

Augusta M Villanueva, PhD: 

 

"In 2009, my concern for young people, especially the vulnerable and at risk, led me to initiate conversations with local executive directors and program staff of agencies serving lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) youth. Over the course of approximately nine months, I attained a wealth of knowledge from these leaders and their staff relative to the plight of youth who seek their services, and who often are segmented from family and unable to take care of themselves. Our commitment to at-risk youth fostered the development of a consortium that collaboratively developed and submitted an R21 grant proposal"

 

From http://depts.washington.edu/ccph/pdf_files/Villanueva%20AM%20Personal%20Statement.pdf%202010.pdf and more of the same here: http://depts.washington.edu/ccph/toolkit-portexamples.html#CareerStatement ;

 

Thanks to @CCPH2010 for this

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The challenges for 21st century science - A review of the evidence base surrounding the value of public engagement by scientists

The challenges for 21st century science - A review of the evidence base surrounding the value of public engagement by scientists | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

Working paper prepared for the Science for All Expert Group by Paul Benneworth  

 

"Engagement arenas have a dual role – they allow publics and scientists to discuss scientific issues, but they also help publics and scientists to become better at discussing those issues."

 

http://interactive.bis.gov.uk/scienceandsociety/site/all/files/2010/02/Benneworth-FINAL2.pdf ;

 

Thanks to Emily Dawson for this suggestion

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Research Professional - Public engagement has unexpected benefits

The leaders of a programme aimed at promoting public engagement at the University of Aberdeen are finding that the skills picked up through such work can make people better researchers.
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The benefits of public engagement to universities and to the public | National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement

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Social progress – thanks to social participation

Social progress – thanks to social participation | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

According to the authors, these [participation] processes are advantageous in a number of ways. For example:

 

The public gets to have a greater say, thanks to increased opportunities for social and political participation; citizens also gain a greater understanding of social and political structures and processes, and are encouraged to become more involved in political and social developments even beyond the effort to indentify new indicators.

 

Policymakers find it easier to do their jobs, since an open, participatory debate on the issues at hand and on goals, conflicts and costs mean public-sector actors no longer need to find solutions on their own and then explain them to the general public.

 

Governance systems are strengthened by the process as they become more flexible and begin communicating information in a more open manner; social and technological innovations also develop and the public adopts new ways of engaging with social issues.

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This scoop is a bit of topic, but shows the wider benefits of public engagement.
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Striking a balance between science and communication

Striking a balance between science and communication | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it
Patrick Middleton's insight:

"Science communication gives you the chance to find out about other fields and helps put your research into context. It may even, as has happened with me, lead to new insights that only come with a broader, even interdisciplinary, way of thinking."

 

HT Joe Winters of IoP, @J_O_Winters 

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Connected Communities Evaluation Report

Patrick Middleton's insight:

"...it was clear that they [researchers] had taken a variety of things away from the day, ‘sharpening up their ideas’"

Researcher: "I think the group discussions, the discussions, we got a lot out of…we got lots and lots of notes and we got lots of ideas, we certainly got a sense of what people felt and a lot of it did actually help reinforce that the approach we were taking was right, so that was good."

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Public engagement lens (Draft)

This 'lens' highlights the skills and competencies that researchers need and/or can develop by doing public engagement.
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Evaluation of Sciencewise-ERC

Evaluation of Sciencewise-ERC | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

"Impacts on scientists, experts and other stakeholders involved in the dialogue projects included having enabled them to develop new skills, experience and confidence in communicating with the public, provided opportunities to learn about public views, fears and questions first hand, increased their respect for the quality of the potential public contribution to science and technology, and enabled them to gain a higher personal profile and build new relationships and networks."

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Poet in Residence


This example comes out of a poet-in-residence scheme as part of a campus-wide engagement programme exploring the issues around the personal genome and society. The programme aimed to involve everyone working at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus so included Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute staff and also staff from the European Bioinformatics Institute.

 

The poet in residence was Fiona Sampson and she visited campus several times and was commissioned to write eleven poems. Anyway, one of the Sanger Institute researchers and also the engagement project committee's chair, Dr Jeff Barrett, said the following about his encounters with Fiona:

 

"The idea of inviting a poet to campus had raised many eyebrows, and I also wondered what inspiration an artist wielding abstract words would find in our concrete world. Almost as soon as we started talking, however, I found myself off my familiar script of explaining what research I do, and instead talking about why I do it. That one conversation changed how I view my own science."

 

Neither Jeff or Fiona were the intended audience; the project was meant to engage campus staff and they were really just the people facilitating this engagement through their involvement in the poet-in-residence part of the wider project. Also, the result wasn't a change in research perspective, it was a change of script as Jeff says - a new way of thinking about how he presents what he does. “

 

Thanks to Louisa Wood for this example

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Science in Dialogue - conference report

A few extracts:

 

"Done well, public dialogue opens up and informs political debate about alternatives. It points to the many possible ways in which we might proceed and make lock-ins and other forms of closure less likely. Dialogue is one of many ways (others include collaborative research and interdisciplinarity) of broadening research agendas and increasing diversity."

 

"The challenge is to make scientists conscious that science is embedded in society, and that dialogue with the wider public is a prerequisite for scientific responsibility. In fact, it is the role of the public to make scientists responsible. Scientists have to learn this... Responsible Research and Innovation must become an integral part of the scientific process... The benefit
is more responsible science and less regulation, including fewer control mechanisms"

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Ben Thackeray - PhD Student at the University of Manchester

Ben Thackeray - PhD Student at the University of Manchester (mp3)
Ben talks about what he's learnt through public engagement, and what has surprised him about the public perception of science.

 

Courtesy of @erinmaochu (again!)

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Opportunities and Benefits - Manchester Beacon Network

Opportunities and Benefits - Manchester Beacon Network | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

Lots of examples of different benefits for all sorts of people doing public engagement, including researchers. e.g.

 

"It really made me think about how people who aren't scientsist would see what I do, a very interesting experience"

 

Watch the video here: http://www.manchesterbeacon.org/ourlearning/opportunities-and-benefits#sally-freeman ;

 

Thanks @erinmaochu for highlighting this

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PLoS Biology: Opening Up the Politics of Knowledge and Power in Bioscience

PLoS Biology: Opening Up the Politics of Knowledge and Power in Bioscience | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

By Andy Stirling

 

"Despite the many different forms, roles, and perspectives around public engagement, then, it is clear that (in bioscience governance, as elsewhere), the real value of more inclusive participation lies in opening up—rather than closing down—a healthy, mature, accountable democratic politics of technology choice.

 

So, the challenge lies not so much in procedural design, as in the creation of a dynamic new political arena—in which reasoned scepticism is as valued in public debates about technology as it is in science itself. In this way, we may hope to renew and recombine two strangely sundered aspects of the Enlightenment: science and democracy. Far from presenting obstacles (as often implied), it is the emergence of a diverse vibrant new “fifth estate” of practices and institutions around public engagement that best embodies a true Enlightenment vision of progress. Indeed, in bioscience as elsewhere, this exercise of greater social agency over the directions for knowledge and innovation moves beyond enlightenment over the mere possibility of social advance, towards real enablement of a greater diversity of directions for human progress."

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