Public engagement - why bother?
1.4K views | +0 today
Follow
Public engagement - why bother?
What do practising research scientists get out of doing public engagement?
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Patrick Middleton
Scoop.it!

Social progress – thanks to social participation

Social progress – thanks to social participation | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it

According to the authors, these [participation] processes are advantageous in a number of ways. For example:

 

The public gets to have a greater say, thanks to increased opportunities for social and political participation; citizens also gain a greater understanding of social and political structures and processes, and are encouraged to become more involved in political and social developments even beyond the effort to indentify new indicators.

 

Policymakers find it easier to do their jobs, since an open, participatory debate on the issues at hand and on goals, conflicts and costs mean public-sector actors no longer need to find solutions on their own and then explain them to the general public.

 

Governance systems are strengthened by the process as they become more flexible and begin communicating information in a more open manner; social and technological innovations also develop and the public adopts new ways of engaging with social issues.

more...
Patrick Middleton's comment, June 19, 2013 10:11 AM
This scoop is a bit of topic, but shows the wider benefits of public engagement.
Scooped by Patrick Middleton
Scoop.it!

Scientists who engage with society perform better academically

"We find that, contrary to what is often suggested, scientists active in dissemination are also more active academically. However, their dissemination activities have almost no impact (positive or negative) on their career."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick Middleton
Scoop.it!

Breeding better beer - Feature

Breeding better beer - Feature | Public engagement - why bother? | Scoop.it
Brewing-enthusiast Dr Chris Ridout had little idea when he applied for a BBSRC public engagement grant in 2001 that it might lead him to resurrect a Victorian beer.
Patrick Middleton's insight:

Dr Ridout said: "I've always been quite keen on public engagement and it's something I've tried to do.

"Even at the start of the project I thought something interesting might come out of it but I didn't know what or how.

"It's very surprising. The way things have turned out, it's really quite exciting. "

more...
No comment yet.