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Rescooped by donald william riden from Brain-based learning
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When Gaming Is Good for You

When Gaming Is Good for You | Memory + Reaction | Scoop.it

Videogames can change a person's brain and, as researchers are finding, often that change is for the better.

 

A growing body of university research suggests that gaming improves creativity, decision-making and perception. The specific benefits are wide ranging, from improved hand-eye coordination in surgeons to vision changes that boost night driving ability.


Via Katherine Stevens
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Dominic Wlliams's curator insight, March 15, 2013 9:51 AM

The most important thing about this article is that research suggests that playing video games improves creativity, decision-making and perception

donald william riden's comment, March 18, 2013 10:09 AM
that is very true dominic
Rescooped by donald william riden from the psychology of music
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Music and Memory: Get Back to Where You Once Belonged | Psychology Today

Music and Memory: Get Back to Where You Once Belonged | Psychology Today | Memory + Reaction | Scoop.it
Music shapes the stories of our lives. By Cathy Malchiodi, PhD, LPCC, LPAT...

 

To what extent does music shape autobiographical memory? And how does it help increase understanding of human memory? The Magical Memory Tour is creating the largest database on music, memory, and personal history ever attempted.


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Rescooped by donald william riden from Brain-based learning
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Why Walking through a Doorway Makes You Forget: Scientific American

Why Walking through a Doorway Makes You Forget: Scientific American | Memory + Reaction | Scoop.it

Scientists measure the "doorway effect," and it supports a novel model of human memory ....  So there's the thing we know best: The common and annoying experience of arriving somewhere only to realize you've forgotten what you went there to do. We all know why such forgetting happens: we didn’t pay enough attention, or too much time passed, or it just wasn’t important enough. But a “completely different” idea comes from a team of researchers at the University of Notre Dame. The first part of their paper’s title sums it up: “Walking through doorways causes forgetting.”


Via Katherine Stevens
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