Psychosurgery
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Psychosurgery
"Psychosurgery involves severing or otherwise disabling areas of the brain to treat a personality disorder, behavior disorder, or other mental illness. Modern psychosurgical techniques target the pathways between the limbic system (the portion of the brain on the inner edge of the cerebral cortex) that is believed to regulate emotions, and the frontal cortex, where thought processes are seated." Definition from: http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/psychosurgery
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'Brain pacemaker' may slow effects of Alzheimer's - TODAY.com

'Brain pacemaker' may slow effects of Alzheimer's - TODAY.com | Psychosurgery | Scoop.it
While they are careful not to call it a cure, researchers at Ohio State University believe they may be able to reverse some of the...
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You’ve probably heard of a pacemaker for your heart. Well, now there’s one for your brain! Researchers at Ohio State University have found a treatment that may slow down the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. This method involves putting tiny electrodes on the brain that stimulate the brain to jump-start neural connections that are slowed down by the build up of proteins on neurons due to Alzheimer’s. These electrodes are hooked up to a pacemaker that rests on the patient’s chest. Kathy Sanford, a victim of early-onset Alzheimer’s, was the first to receive deep-brain stimulation as a way to treat Alzheimer’s. Kathy’s family states she is more outgoing and aware of her surroundings, which is a good sign! Kathy hopes that the positive outcomes in her case become the beginning of a treatment method for many others’ struggles with this same disease.

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The split brain: A tale of two halves

The split brain: A tale of two halves | Psychosurgery | Scoop.it
Since the 1960s, researchers have been scrutinizing a handful of patients who underwent a radical kind of brain surgery.
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This article starts off by telling you about a specific split-brain case, a woman named Vicki. In June of 1979, Vicki underwent brain surgery to cut the connections between the two hemispheres of her brain to control her wild epileptic episodes. After the surgery, Vicki found it difficult to do day to day tasks such as grocery shopping – it would take her around three hours to complete one trip. But about a year later, Vicki found herself able to function with less difficulty, getting back to things like cutting vegetables, playing cards, and waterskiing. Vicki is one of the few split brain patients in the world, and of the even fewer whose brains have been subject of experiments to study these cases, even by Gazzaniga himself.

The article then goes on to explain more about the experiments and research that has come of them. Scientists have been able to discover the left and right hemispheres single abilities – the left being the hemisphere of reasoning, and the right being the creative and recognizing hemisphere.

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Split-Brain Patients Reveal Brain's Flexibility: Scientific American

Split-Brain Patients Reveal Brain's Flexibility: Scientific American | Psychosurgery | Scoop.it
Dwayne Godwin is a neuroscientist at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Jorge Cham draws the comic strip Piled Higher and Deeper at www.phdcomics.com .
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This cartoon gives an easy understanding of split brain patients. It tells the story of the picture studies that Rodger Sperry and Michael Gazzaniga did on their patients. This cartoon talks about how each hemisphere of your brain can perform tasks separately, without the help of the other, but that the two halves work even better as a team – like a married couple.

 

This really gives the short and sweet version regarding split brain patients and studies, with a cartoon to help!

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Psychosurgery

Psychosurgery | Psychosurgery | Scoop.it
Offers a look at the treatment dilemma posed by psychosurgery,
surgery to treat psychiatric disorders.
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This article gives a brief summary on the history of psychosurgery and how it has appeared over the years. It then goes into detail on a specific case of an epileptic patient named Matthew. Matthew had severe seizures in the past, and in 1987, had two amygdalotomies to try and control them. Matthew was no success story. Three years later, doctors went back in to perform a cingulotomy: an operation designed to calm his brain. This surgery was a success story.

I like the detail of this article. It does not go into gore, but it does show the preciseness of psychosurgery today, and how it is very much different than in it's past.

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The History of Psychological Treatment: Psychosurgery | Manon Eileen - a Writer's Blog

The History of Psychological Treatment: Psychosurgery | Manon Eileen - a Writer's Blog | Psychosurgery | Scoop.it
The invention, rise and decline of psychosurgery and its use in recent years. At its heyday, 5000 lobotomies were performed annualy!
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This article gives a good history of psychosurgery as a whole. It tells how the surgery has advanced over the years, decreased over the years, and changed form over it’s lifetime. Psychosurgery began as drilling holes in the brain of patients, and has progressed to cutting out a specific part of the brain no bigger than one square centimeter. This article tells about the different forms of psychosurgery including: lobotomy, leucotomy, cingulotomy, and deep brain stimulation. This is a good article to inform you on the history and progression of psychosurgery and it’s different forms.

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Split Brain Behavioral Experiments | What is Psychology?

Split Brain Behavioral Experiments | What is Psychology? | Psychosurgery | Scoop.it
Meet Joe. After suffering from years of epilepsy, Joe underwent brain surgery to have his corpus callosum severed. How will Joe be affected? Let us find out.
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This is a video of Joe, an epileptic patient that underwent surgery to sever his corpus callosum. This video shows how the surgery is affecting his life now.

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You Thought Lobotomy Was History? It's Back Under a New Name. -

You Thought Lobotomy Was History? It's Back Under a New Name. - | Psychosurgery | Scoop.it
Samantha Stafford's insight:

This article provides an opinion against psychosurgery, and through the patient’s eyes. It often asks, “Is the doctor really thinking of how this is going to effect the patient?” and, “What is it like to live your whole life with this disorder, and suddenly now your whole world is changed?” Perhaps the best thing for the patient would be to leave the disorder be, rather than put them through a treatment that they have to re-adjust to.

 

I like that this article shows another side to psychosurgery, however the tone is almost negative.

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