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Rescooped by Elizabeth Oropeza from gender sociology
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His brain, her brain?

There is a long history of scientific inquiry about what role biological sex plays in differences between brain function in human males and females. Greater knowledge of the influence of biological sex on the human brain promises much-needed insights into brain function and especially dysfunctions that differentially affect the sexes (1). Certainly, advancing technologies and an increasing wealth of data (with more sophisticated analyses) should prompt robust future research—carefully conducted and well replicated—that can elucidate sex effects in the brain. However, this field of research has spurred an equally long history of debate as to whether inherent differences in brains of males and females predispose the sexes to stereotypical behaviors, or whether such claims reinforce and legitimate traditional gender stereotypes and roles in ways that are not scientifically justified—so-called neurosexism. Although this topic remains controversial, a commonly held belief is that the psyches of females and males are highly distinct. These differences are perceived as natural, fixed, and invariant across time and place (2), presumably due to unique female versus male brain circuitry that is largely fixed by a sexually differentiated genetic blueprint. A major challenge in the field is to crtically view previous experimental findings, as well as design future studies, outside the framework of this dichotomous model. Here, gender scholarship can hasten scientific progress by revealing the implicit assumptions that can give rise to inadvertent neurosexism.

 

His brain, her brain?
Cordelia Fine

Science 21 November 2014:
Vol. 346 no. 6212 pp. 915-916
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1262061


Via Complexity Digest, Tammy Sykes
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Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, November 30, 2014 5:47 PM

Hay que seguir estudiando las relaciones entre género y actividad cerebral

Tammy Sykes's curator insight, January 1, 2015 11:06 AM

Is gender biological or socially learned. Research is quoted in the article. 

 

Module 1 - SOCI 330

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Human visual cortex holds neurons that selectively respond to intermediate colors

Human visual cortex holds neurons that selectively respond to intermediate colors | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Researchers from Tohoku University's Research Institute of Electrical Communication and RIKEN BSI have found the presence of neurons in the human brain whi ...
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Oropeza from Educación, Pedagogía Social y Universidad
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Education & Neuroscience - YouTube

Neuroscience and Education

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William baldwin's curator insight, June 21, 2015 7:48 AM

I know we were supposed to play more games!!

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Brain imaging study shows women experience negative emotions differently than men

Brain imaging study shows women experience negative emotions differently than men | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Women react differently to negative images compared to men, which may be explained by subtle differences in brain function. This neurobiological explanatio ...
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Oropeza from Philosophy everywhere everywhen
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Boredom is not a problem to be solved. It's the last privilege of a free mind | Gayatri Devi

Boredom is not a problem to be solved. It's the last privilege of a free mind | Gayatri Devi | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Confessing to boredom is confessing to a character-flaw. Popular culture is littered with advice on how to shake it off: find like-minded people, take up a hobby, find a cause and work for it, take up an instrument, read a book, clean your house And certainly don’t let your kids be bored: enroll them in swimming, soccer, dance, church groups – anything to keep them from assuaging their boredom by gravitating toward sex and drugs. To do otherwise is to admit that we’re not engaging with the world around us. Or that your cellphone has died.

But boredom is not tragic. Properly understood, boredom helps us understand time, and ourselves. Unlike fun or work, boredom is not about anything; it is our encounter with pure time as form and content. With ads and screens and handheld devices ubiquitous, we don’t get to have that experience that much anymore. We should teach the young people to feel comfortable with time.

I live and teach in small-town Pennsylvania, and some of my students from bigger cities tell me that they always go home on Fridays because they are bored here.

You know the best antidote to boredom, I asked them? They looked at me expectantly, smartphones dangling from their hands. Think, I told them. Thinking is the best antidote to boredom. I am not kidding, kids. Thinking is the best antidote to boredom. Tell yourself, I am bored. Think about that. Isn’t that interesting? They looked at me incredulously. Thinking is not how they were brought up to handle boredom.

When you’re bored, time moves slowly. The German word for “boredom” expresses this: langeweile, a compound made of “lange,” which means “long,” and “weile” meaning “a while”. And slow-moving time can feel torturous for people who can’t feel peaceful alone with their minds. Learning to do so is why learning to be bored is so crucial. It is a great privilege if you can do this without going to the psychiatrist.

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How Exercise Helps Moderate Brain Damage Caused by Drinking

How Exercise Helps Moderate Brain Damage Caused by Drinking | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Research shows that exercise encourages your brain to work at optimum capacity by causing nerve cells to multiply and protecting them from damage.
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Future of Neurophysiology: to Slice or not to Slice? - Sci-News.com

Future of Neurophysiology: to Slice or not to Slice? - Sci-News.com | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Sci-News.com
Future of Neurophysiology: to Slice or not to Slice?
Sci-News.com
Neuroscience is one of the liveliest fields and one that captures the imagination of us all as it aspires to explain who we are, by peering into our minds.
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In Conversation With Neuroscientists - The Atlantic

In Conversation With Neuroscientists - The Atlantic | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
The Atlantic
In Conversation With Neuroscientists
The Atlantic
In 1998, two New Zealand neuroscientists created the first-ever images of what a brain looks like when a person is thinking. In the past 15 years, the field has come a long way.
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A Review of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Function in Chronic Fatigue ... - ProHealth

A Review of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Function in Chronic Fatigue ... - ProHealth | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
A Review of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Function in Chronic Fatigue ...
ProHealth
7, no. 11, Article ID e49518, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar; S. M. Smith and W. W.
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Picking your brains - The appliance of neuroscience - IHS Jane's 360

Picking your brains - The appliance of neuroscience - IHS Jane's 360 | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Picking your brains - The appliance of neuroscience IHS Jane's 360 The engineering and empirical aspects of applied neuroscience have gone beyond basic understanding of the brain, and neuroscience is now capturing the attention of the intelligence...
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Announcement: “Brave New Love” in AJOB:Neuroscience – peer commentaries ... - Practical Ethics (blog)

Announcement: “Brave New Love” in AJOB:Neuroscience – peer commentaries ... - Practical Ethics (blog) | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Announcement: “Brave New Love” in AJOB:Neuroscience – peer commentaries ...
Practical Ethics (blog)
AJOB:Neuroscience asks that by Monday, October 7, 2013 you submit a short summary of your proposed Open Peer Commentary (no more than 1-2 paragraphs).
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How Neuroscience Could Make Your Resistance Futile - Forbes

How Neuroscience Could Make Your Resistance Futile - Forbes | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
How Neuroscience Could Make Your Resistance Futile
Forbes
Comply. That's an uneasy watchword at the very center of social cohesion.
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Oropeza from :: The 4th Era ::
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Playing Video Games Can Boost Brain Power ~ Neuroscience News

Playing Video Games Can Boost Brain Power ~ Neuroscience News | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it

"Certain types of video games can help to train the brain to become more agile and improve strategic thinking, according to scientists from Queen Mary University of London and University College London (UCL).

 

"The researchers recruited 72 volunteers and measured their ‘cognitive flexibility’ described as a person’s ability to adapt and switch between tasks, and think about multiple ideas at a given time to solve problems."


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Antipsychotics increase risk of death in people with Parkinson's disease psychosis

Antipsychotics increase risk of death in people with Parkinson's disease psychosis | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Antipsychotic drugs may increase the risk of death in people with Parkinson's disease psychosis (PDP), according to a new study led by researchers from the ...
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Scientists reveal brain network for observed social threat interactions

Scientists reveal brain network for observed social threat interactions | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Observing one person threatening another is a commonplace event. Now, in research published in eLife, scientists have used large-scale neural recording and ...
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Oropeza from dandil tunda
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Can Synagen IQ Keep Your Brain Sharp? Watch out: SCAM!

Can Synagen IQ Keep Your Brain Sharp? Watch out: SCAM! | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
This brain power increasing dosage actually made as per accurate neural functions and to makes their progress level higher effectively so trust its working

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dandil tunda's curator insight, August 20, 2015 1:57 AM

And he does Eve goes to bed around but he really doesn't get to sleep until a o'clock or even later he gets up once during about two in the morning to Synagen IQ go to the bathroom but any wakes up in the morning at normal time but really feeling on refreshed then to catch up he sort napping at work a he takes two glasses of wine with at dinner disorder unwind a little bit and then he really needs to double lot days in the ..

http://www.x4facts.com/synagen-iq/

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Buffalo Tales - Overcoming IED

Buffalo Tales - Overcoming IED | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
@DrOz @DrPhil Intermittent Explosive Disorder. REAL honest Blog http://t.co/oYVgOTRYAz #mentalhealth #psycology #love #ied #honest #share
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Brain Training | Brain Training And The Learning-Disabled

Brain Training | Brain Training And The Learning-Disabled | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Brain Training (Brain Training And The Learning-Disabled http://t.co/ZP4DJ32G5N #brain #brainpower #braintraining)
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Why neuroscience is ending the Prozac era | Impact Lab

Why neuroscience is ending the Prozac era | Impact Lab | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it

The big money has moved from developing psychiatric drugs to manipulating our brain networks. Has the psychiatric drug age reached its peak? Mind-altering


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Neuroscience Conference 'Changes Lives' - Wabash College

Neuroscience Conference 'Changes Lives' - Wabash College | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Wabash College Neuroscience Conference 'Changes Lives' Wabash College Dean of the College Gary Phillips welcomes participants from colleges and universities across the Midwest to the 5th Annual Midwest/Great Lakes Undergraduate Research Symposium...
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New Theory in Neuroscience: Common Mechanisms in Fragile X and Down ... - Science Daily (press release)

New Theory in Neuroscience: Common Mechanisms in Fragile X and Down ...
Science Daily (press release)
Oct.
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Web design, meet neuroscience: EyeQuant gets funding for eye-tracking tech - VentureBeat

Web design, meet neuroscience: EyeQuant gets funding for eye-tracking tech - VentureBeat | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Web design, meet neuroscience: EyeQuant gets funding for eye-tracking tech
VentureBeat
Supermarkets have long honed the art of attracting a shopper's gaze. Now, Germany's EyeQuant is using eye-tracking simulation tech to do the same on the web.
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The neuroscience of Facebook: It makes our brains happy - Salon

The neuroscience of Facebook: It makes our brains happy - Salon | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it
Salon
The neuroscience of Facebook: It makes our brains happy
Salon
The neuroscience of Facebook: It makes our brains happy. Excerpted from "Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired To Connect".
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Oropeza from Designing service
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Watch Pivot Thinking: The Neuroscience of Design

Mark Scharr explores the latest findings in cognitive science and neuroscience that helps explain the thinking behind design...


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Rescooped by Elizabeth Oropeza from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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Mathematical Neuroscience - SciTech Connect

Mathematical Neuroscience - SciTech Connect | psychoneuroinmunology | Scoop.it

Roman R. Poznanski discusses the new book that he co-authored, Mathematical Neuroscience. In the second decade of the twenty-first century, brain researchers (neuroscientists) have begun to decipher the dynamics of large-scale neural networks and to gauge how the functioning of the brain is dependent on the spatiotemporal integration of the resultant dynamics. Knowing more detailed facts about brain connectivity, we are faced with the problem of how such information can be put together in one system to understand the whole brain and the effective tracing of cause-and-effect relationships determining its actions. Data gathering by neuroinformaticians steadfastly produces a ‘brain in a supercomputer’ virtual model that can be regularly updated to fill in the missing pieces of the puzzle. Unfortunately, such data gathering does not imply that there is a “glue” that allows us to join together multiple empirical observations into a complete theory of the brain.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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