Psychology: the brain & behaviours
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Practising validation*

Practising validation* | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...So how do you effectively listen to and validate your partner? There are a few key components to help guide your conversations.

1. Mindful listening is the first component of validation. This means you really pay attention to what your partner is saying. As difficult as it might be, suspend your own judgments and reactions to the situation or topic. Temporarily let go of the need to advise, change, help or fix the situation. Your own thoughts are put on the back burner; your focus, instead, is on your partner’s current experience. Show you are listening by stopping what you are doing (closing the laptop, turning off the TV), turning to face them, nodding your head, and making eye contact as they talk.

2. Acknowledging and accepting is the next step in validation. This means you acknowledge what they’ve said or what they are feeling. You might say, “I can see you’re upset about this,” or “You seem discouraged” in response to their news about having to work over the weekend. Rather than trying to cheer your partner up, you allow them space to be upset.

3. Validating does not equal agreeing. An important distinction is that you can accept your partner’s feelings, but it doesn’t mean you need to agree with them. For instance, say that you go to see a movie together. Afterward, you discuss your thoughts about the film. Your partner found it entertaining and funny, while you found it boring and predictable. You might validate their point of view by saying, “It sounds like you really enjoyed the film. It wasn’t my favorite, but I can tell that you had fun watching it.” In this example, you’re acknowledging your partner’s enjoyment of something, without sharing the same sentiment.

4. Ask questions. If your partner presents a problem or difficult situation to you, try to find out more about how they are feeling and what they want by asking open-ended questions. “What do you wish would happen?” “What was your reaction to that?” “How are you feeling about things now?” Gently asking questions to clarify their experience can be very gratifying for them. It shows you care and want to really listen.

5. Show you understand. Use validating statements such as, “I would feel that way, too,” or “It makes sense to me that you’d feel that way given the circumstances” to let them know you see why they feel the way they do. You can also show validation with non-verbals, such as giving them a hug if they feel lonely, making them a cup of tea if they feel jittery, or giving them space if they need time to think..."

[click on the title for the full article] 

 * original title: "The Single Best Thing You Can Do for Your Relationship"


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
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Extremely practical tips for developing the skills in providing affirmations

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Brain Hacking Is Having Incredible Effects And It's Just Getting Started

Brain Hacking Is Having Incredible Effects And It's Just Getting Started | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it
A small jolt of electrical stimulation can boost memory and focus. What'll be possible once we can implant chips into the brain?

Via Luis Valdes
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Very interesting area that does not immediately throw up the ethical barrier to scientific exploration, more - it pushes the barrier...

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Jon Kabat-Zinn Defines Mindfulness - YouTube

Clinical mindfulness expert Jon Kabat-Zinn gives an operational definition of mindfulness. An excerpt from "Becoming Conscious: The Science of Mindfulness" f...

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, September 20, 2015 2:43 PM

what mindfulness is!

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Eric Berne on Awareness

Eric Berne on Awareness | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...Awareness means the capacity to see a coffeepot and hear the birds sing in one’s own way, and not the way one was taught. It may be assumed on good grounds that seeing and hearing have a different quality for infants than for grownups, and that they are more aesthetic and less intellectual in the first years of life. A little boy sees and hears birds with delight. Then the ‘good father’ comes along and feels he should ‘share’ the experience and help his son ‘develop’. He says: ‘That’s a jay, and this is a sparrow.’ The moment the little boy is concerned with which is a jay and which is a sparrow, he can no longer see the birds or hear them sing. He has to see and hear them the way his father wants him to. Father has good reasons on his side, since few people can afford to go through life listening to the birds sing, and the sooner the little boy starts his ‘education’ the better. Maybe he will be an ornithologist when he grows up. A few people, however, can still see and hear in the old way. But most of the members of the human race have lost the capacity to be painters, poets or musicians, and are not left the option of seeing and hearing directly even if they can afford to; they must get it secondhand. The recovery of this ability is called here ‘awareness’..."

~ Eric Berne, Games People Play 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
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Beautiful

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Is Consciousness a "Stream"?

Is Consciousness a "Stream"? | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"In 1890 William James introduced the metaphor of the “stream of consciousness” into Western psychology: “Consciousness… is nothing jointed; it flows. A ‘river’ or ‘stream’ are the metaphors by which it is most naturally described. In talking of it hereafter, let us call it the stream of thought, of consciousness, or of subjective life.”

 

Over a thousand years before, the same image figured prominently in the Buddhist philosophical tradition known as the Abhidharma. There the Buddha is portrayed as saying: “The river never stops: there is no moment, no minute, no hour when the river stops: in the same way, the flux of thought” (quoted in Louis de la Vallée Poussin, “Notes sur le moment ou ksnana des bouddhistes”).

 

[...]

 

These studies using the attentional blink task indicate that intensive Theravāda Vipassanā meditation improves attention and affects brain processes related to attention. In recent years, other studies using other tasks and a wide range of meditation styles have shown that mindfulness meditation improves perceptual sensitivity and strengthens the abilities to sustain attention on a chosen object and to remain open to the entire field of awareness from moment to moment. One route by which these changes may happen is that Vipassanā meditation may fine-tune the theta oscillations that shape the stream of sensory events into rhythmic pulses of conscious perception.

 

So is perceptual consciousness a “stream”? Yes, in the sense that it seems to flow, but no, if “flow” means “uniformly and continuously.” Instead, the flow is rhythmic, with variable dynamic pulses.

You might object, however, that if Vipassanā meditation changes experience and how the brain operates, then we have no right to assume that ordinary, premeditative consciousness is not uniform. Maybe premeditative consciousness is uniform and Vipassanā meditation changes it. Given this possibility, it’s unwarranted to project onto premeditative experience how experience seems after meditative training.

 

This objection is important. As a general policy, we must avoid the fallacy of projecting qualities from later trained experience onto earlier untrained experience. In the present case, however, we have independent data from psychology and neuroscience that ordinary perception and attention exhibit rhythmic pulses, at least in certain respects or under certain conditions. We also have data about the electrical brain rhythms linked to these pulses. Given these findings, as well as the findings from the Vipassanā meditation studies on how meditation affects the same cognitive functions and electrical brain rhythms, it seems legitimate to conclude that mindfulness meditation can reveal and sensitive you to rhythmic and pulsing aspects of awareness that you may ordinarily overlook. So both James and the Abhidharma philosophers were right."

[click on the title for the full article] 



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Inside Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh's radical management experiment that prompted ... - Yahoo Finance UK

Inside Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh's radical management experiment that prompted ... - Yahoo Finance UK | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it
On March 24, Zappos' 1,500 or so employees got a memo from CEO Tony Hsieh. "This is a long...

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Fascinating emergence of new organisational psychology for new consciousness 

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Summary | World Happiness Report


Via Sandeep Gautam
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☮ The simple things in life are measurable

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, April 24, 2015 9:33 AM

World happiness report 2015 now available. What a shame that India is at 117 and more concerning is that it is one of the 11 mots losers from 2005-7 to 2012-14. The only silver lining being there is lot of scope for improving well being in this country:-)

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Empathy and life

Empathy and life | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...For many people the denial of the inevitability of death means a denial of their emotional life, because dealing with the emotions means entering a world unknown, a world of darkness. Wilson van Dusen (“The Natural Depth in Man”, in Rogers and Stevens, Person to Person Souvenir Press, 1973) wrote of the “inner me”, which he also called l'autre moi , which is distinctly different from the “outer me” and includes “spontaneous associations of thought which arise unbidden when in a social context or alone.” Van Dusen pointed out that “The border of the inner is reached when spontaneous thoughts, feelings, or images arise, perhaps related to the outer situation at hand, but still autonomously surprising in their nature.” Empathy starts here. Daniel Goleman in his great book Emotional Intelligence (Bloomsbury, 1996), wrote, “Empathy builds on self-awareness; the more open we are to our own emotions, the more skilled we will be in reading feelings.”

 

This is precisely what we have difficulty with. Carl Rogers, in his essay “What it Means to Become a Person” (in On Becoming a Person , Houghton Mifflin, 1995), wrote, “In our daily lives there are a thousand and one reasons for not letting ourselves experience our attitudes fully, reasons from our past and from the present, reasons that reside within the social situation. It seems too dangerous, too potentially damaging, to experience them freely and fully.” And so we immerse ourselves in many avoidance strategies, like the pursuit of efficiency, money, status, power, ideological commitment, sex, ways to fill “the earth and subdue it, rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the sky, over every living creature that moves on the ground” (Genesis 1: 28). Using these avoidance strategies blunts our sensitivity to not only our own feelings, but those of others. Goleman again: “The emotional notes and chords that weave through people's words and actions – the telling tone of voice or shift in posture, the eloquent silence or telltale tremble – go by unnoted.” Goleman continues: “This failure to register another's feelings is a major deficit in emotional intelligence, and a tragic failing in what it means to be human. For all rapport, the root of caring, stems from emotional attunement, from the capacity for empathy.”..."

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The Legacy of a Narcissistic Parent

The Legacy of a Narcissistic Parent | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...If you grew up with narcissistic parents, never fear, the legacy can end with you! Your parents’ mistakes can be rocket fuel for your own development.

First, you have to grieve the loss of the parent you never had. Really grieve the fact that you didn’t get the parent you needed, the one who put you and your needs first. Part of that requires releasing the fantasy that your narcissistic parent can change and eventually give you what you need. They can evolve and grow, but they may never evolve enough to meet your deepest needs. Therefore, managing expectations is key, particularly when you see glimpses of the healthy parent you wish you had had, but in fact those glimpses are often not sustainable. Accept that your parent was limited—and could not give you unconditional love or even deep empathy because she could not get past herself to truly see you. Allow yourself to feel your feelings, the anger and the sadness. Emotion has the word motion in it; allow your emotions to move through you. You might not have lost your parent to death, but you lost what could have been—you lost an opportunity to be truly mothered—and that is really a profound loss. Accepting this, rather than denying it, is the first step in opening your heart to healing.

You are going to need to discover boundaries—where you begin and your parents end—to free your authentic self. When you choose who you want to be, rather than who your parents wanted you to be, you break free from their narcissistic grip. Tolerate their discomfort, even if they make a lot of noise. You are not misbehaving, rebelling, or rejecting them. You are being you, the real you—maybe for the first time. This is the first part of breaking the cycle. Next, you don’t want to repeat/generalize the relationship that you had with your narcissistic parent to your coworkers, partner, or friends. Realize where you are meeting the needs of other narcissists in your life, real or imagined. Sometimes children of narcissists assume that every person they’re close to will need the same kind of hyper-attention and appeasement that their parent did—and unconsciously begin doing mental backbends to please others. At times you may be tapping into the expectations of a narcissistic boss or partner, and reflexively playing that familiar role. At other times you may be making erroneous assumptions about what someone important to you really needs—perhaps they don’t want you to mirror their opinions or they don’t need you to sugarcoat your real feelings or soften constructive criticism. Breathe, pause, give yourself some psychic space and then test it. Try just being frank, try not to rush in and take care of their feelings. If being different from your loved one feels uncomfortable—or if you feel you’re risking love with that stance—just notice it. Watch how much stronger your bond is than what you secretly imagined it to be. This is the gift of evolving past the scene of the original crime—your own childhood. Surviving childhood meant taking care of the narcissist and swallowing your feelings. But now as an adult you can begin to surround yourself with people that you feel safe and at home with—like soul mate girlfriends—who know and love the real you, and this can be deeply transformative.

Children of narcissistic parents often wonder if they are really loveable. You are! Start loving and caring for yourself in ways that you wished your mom or dad had loved and cared for you. Start paying attention to what really matters to you; what makes you feel alive and moments when you feel authentically you. Maybe you will need help mothering yourself. Maybe that means getting re-parented by a therapist, or maybe the healing comes from an emotionally reparative romantic partnership. Maybe you have a friend’s mother who is nurturing to you, or a mentor who celebrates the real you. All of these people can become part of your collective parent. No one person is ever capable of meeting all of your needs so start building your collective parenting community. And once you have learned to mother yourself, you will be able to mother your child..."

[click on the title for the full article] 



Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Lisa A Romano's insight:

High trait neuroticism and effect on children

 

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 3, 2015 12:53 PM

This sounds like if you find a child with very low self-esteem, it is likely his/her parents are more or less narcissistic.  -Lon

Julianna Bonola's curator insight, April 7, 2015 3:51 AM

Individuation is the process of becoming the person you want to be, and not the person others want you to be.  This article demonstrates how our folks can cause life long problems for many not strong enough to trust themselves to become the adults they want to be.

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The Problem with Positive Psychology | The Psychology of Wellbeing

The Problem with Positive Psychology | The Psychology of Wellbeing | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it
Positive psychology has a problem with bias. But not in the way you might think. Why bad can be good and good can be bad.

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Shannon Clarke's curator insight, March 26, 2015 8:31 AM

The way the mind works in millions of different ways for each and every individual is extraordinary. Psychology on an overall is merely looking into the mind of another and reading the introduction of their life and claiming you've read the whole book.

Just like Chris Cleave once quoted;

"Studying psychology is fun because you're always looking for the same things I think a writer should be looking for which is the story behind the story".

 

When psychology aspects are used with accident forensics investigation aspects a larger picture of what has occurred and why can be created. I hope that my idea on psychology as an overall is increased and I am working with patients in a psychological aspect.  

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Focusing: Take your power back

Focusing: Take your power back | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

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Men do cry: one man’s experience of depression

Men do cry: one man’s experience of depression | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

se "...A staggeringly higher number of men than women kill themselves. In the UK the ratio is 3.5:1, in Greece 6:1, in the USA 4:1. This is pretty average. According to the World Health Organisation, the only countries where more women than men kill themselves are China and Hong Kong. Everywhere else, many more men than women end their own lives. This is especially strange when, according to every study, about twice as many women experience depression.

So, clearly, in most places there is something about being a man that makes you more likely to kill yourself. And there is also a paradox. If suicide is a symptom of depression (it is), then why do more women suffer depression than men? Why, in other words, is depression more fatal if you are a man rather than a woman? The fact that suicide rates vary between eras and countries and genders shows that suicide is not set in stone for anyone. Consider the UK. In 1981, 2,466 women in the UK took their own lives. Thirty years later that number had almost halved to 1,391. The corresponding figures for men are 4,129 and then 4,590. So back in 1981, when the Office of National Statistics records began, men were still more likely to kill themselves than women, but only 1.9 times more likely. Now they are 3.5 times more likely.

Why do so many men still kill themselves? What is going wrong? The common answer is that men, traditionally, see mental illness as a sign of weakness and are reluctant to seek help. Boys don’t cry. But they do. We do. I do. I weep all the time. (I wept this afternoon, watching Boyhood.) And boys – and men – do commit suicide.

In White Noise, Don DeLillo’s anxiety-ridden narrator Jack Gladney is tormented by the concept of masculinity and how he measures up: “What could be more useless than a man who couldn’t fix a dripping faucet – fundamentally useless, dead to history, to the messages in his genes?” And what if, instead of a broken faucet it is a broken mind? Then maybe a man who was worried about his manliness would feel he should be able to fix that on his own too, with nothing but silence amid the “white noise” of modern life, and maybe a few litres of alcohol..."

[click on the title for the full article]

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
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Vital to have these statistics popularised

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What is the Difference Between Psychotherapy and Counselling?

What is the Difference Between Psychotherapy and Counselling? | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...COUNSELLING VS PSYCHOTHERAPY

Both explore feelings, beliefs, and thoughts.
Both focus on creating a safe, supportive environment.
Both help you understand yourself better.
Both help you understand others better.
Both help you make better choices and move forward in life.
Both involve working with a therapist with at least three years of training.


BUT

counselling is more likely to be action and behaviour focused
counselling is more likely to be short-term
counselling is more likely to focus on your present issues over past issues
psychotherapy tends to go on longer than a round of counselling sessions
psychotherapy is more likely to be in-depth than counselling
psychotherapy is more likely to explore the past as well as the present
psychotherapy is more likely to explore childhood root issues instead of just behavioural patterns
psychotherapy means your therapist has at least four years of training
psychotherapy can deal with deep mental health problems and disorders that have developed over a long period of time


The above proposed similarities and differences aside, it’s still a murky world when it comes to comparing psychotherapy with counselling. A counsellor might work very deeply in a way that seems psychotherapeutic. A psychotherapist might offer counselling as part of a bigger treatment plan...."


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Lisa A Romano's insight:

I'm often asked to explain the difference between counselling and psychology, and this makes a good start. Psychotherapy - in Australia - can be viewed as a whole different therapeutic model again as a subset of psychological practice.

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Why Saying Is Believing — The Science Of Self-Talk

Why Saying Is Believing — The Science Of Self-Talk | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it
Self-help videos tell women to learn to love their bodies by saying nice things to themselves in the mirror. Can shushing your harshest critic actually rewire the brain?

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Simplicity and science

 

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10 Cognitive Biases That Distort Your Thinking

10 Cognitive Biases That Distort Your Thinking | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it
Cognitive biases can impair rational judgment and lead to poor decisions. Learn more about ten biases that sway your thinking.

Via Luis Valdes
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Classic psych

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Counselling Process: The 7 Stages - by Dr. Nicola Davies

Counselling Process: The 7 Stages - by Dr. Nicola Davies | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...Rogers (1957) noted that, “Individuals move, I began to see, not from fixity or homeostasis through change to a new fixity, though such a process is indeed possible. But much the more significant continuum is from fixity to changingness, from rigid structure to flow, from stasis to process” (p. 100). He expanded on this concept of moving from a rigid experience to one of fluidity by introducing 7 stages he believed clients progressed through as part of therapeutic change: 

 

Stage 1: Clients are defensive and resistant to change. According to Rogers (1958), clients in this stage refer to feelings and emotions as things of the past rather than the present, as they react to past experiences rather than to present ones. Only when a person feels fully accepted, can he or she progress to the next stage. 

 

Stage 2: Clients become slightly less rigid and begin to discuss external events or other people. In this stage, feelings tend to be described as “unowned” or even as past objects.

 

Stage 3: Clients begin to discuss themselves, but as an object rather than a person. This is because they are avoiding a discussion of the present.

 

Stage 4: Clients progress to discussing deeper feelings as they develop a relationship with the counsellor.

 

Stage 5: Clients can express present emotions and begin to rely on their own decision-making abilities. Subsequently, they begin to accept more responsibility for their actions. They have a growing acceptance of contradictions and understanding of incongruence.

 

Stage 6: Clients show rapid growth towards congruence and often begin to develop unconditional positive regard (UPR) for others. This stage indicates the client no longer needs formal counselling (Wilkins, 2000).

 

Stage 7: Clients are fully functioning, self-actualised and empathic, and can show UPR towards others. The last and ultimate stage of person-centred therapy can be construed as achieving movement from heteronomy (control by external forces) to autonomy (control of inner forces) (Kensit, 2000)..." 


[click on the title for the full article] 



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What is Person Centred Therapy

Great description of this approach to counselling by Lisa Roundy.

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My professional Everest and my spiritual compass....mastering the person centred therapeutic approach...

 

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Aspirational parents condemn their children to a desperate, joyless life

Aspirational parents condemn their children to a desperate, joyless life | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...Mental health beds for children in England increased by 50% between 1999 and 2014, but still failed to meet demand. Children suffering mental health crises are being dumped in adult wards or even left in police cells because of the lack of provision (put yourself in their position and imagine the impact).

The number of children admitted to hospital because of self-harm has risen by 68% in 10 years, while the number of young patients with eating disorders has almost doubled in three years. Without good data, we don’t have a clear picture of what the causes might be, but it’s worth noting that in the past year, according to the charity YoungMinds, the number of children receiving counselling for exam stress has tripled.

An international survey of children’s wellbeing found that the UK, where such pressures are peculiarly intense, ranked 13th out of 15 countries for children’s life satisfaction, 13th for agreement with the statement “I like going to school”, 14th for children’s satisfaction with their bodies and 15th for self-confidence. So all that pressure and cramming and exhortation – that worked, didn’t it?

In the cause of self-advancement, we are urged to sacrifice our leisure, our pleasures and our time with partners and children, to climb over the bodies of our rivals and to set ourselves against the common interests of humankind. And then? We discover that we have achieved no greater satisfaction than that with which we began.

In 1653, Izaak Walton described in the Compleat Angler the fate of “poor-rich men”, who “spend all their time first in getting, and next in anxious care to keep it; men that are condemned to be rich, and then always busie or discontented”. Today this fate is confused with salvation..."

[click on the title for the full article] 

 


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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, June 9, 2015 8:35 PM

LPRD GOD FORGIVE US OF ALL OUR SINS AND HELP ALL YOUR CHILDREN FROM THE YOUNGEST TO THE ELDEST AS ONLY YOU LORD GOD ALMIGHTY CAN IN JESUS NAME WE THANK YOU! AMEN AMEN AMEN AND IT IS SO WE DECREE AND DECLARE THE CHILDREN ARE GIVEN RENEWED SPIRIT AND UPRIGHT HEART WITH INNER AND OUTER HEALING AS ONLY YOU LORD GOD CAN AND IS! THANK YOU LORD GOD ALL MIGHTY

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 10, 2015 12:14 AM

This kind of aspirational parenting was becoming common when I started working with a therapeutic boarding school in 1984 and I suspect it is growing worse in the USA.  This article suggests that the same problem exists in the UK also, and probably elsewhere. -Lon

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A social psychologist explains why people misunderstand each other

A social psychologist explains why people misunderstand each other | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...Perception is also clouded by the perceiver’s own experiences, emotions, and biases, which also contributes to misunderstandings between people. As Halvorson puts it, everyone has an agenda when they interact with another person. That agenda is usually trying to determine one of three pieces of information about the perceived: Is this person trustworthy? Is this person useful to me? And does this person threaten my self-esteem?

How a perceiver answers those questions will determine whether she judges the other person in a positive or negative way. Take self-esteem. Researchers have long found that individuals need to maintain a positive sense of themselves to function well.

When someone’s sense of herself is threatened, like when she interacts with someone who she thinks is better than her at a job they both share, she judges that person more harshly. One study found, for example, that attractive job applicants were judged as less qualified by members of the same sex than by members of the opposite sex. The raters who were members of the same sex, the researchers found, felt a threat to their self-esteem by the attractive job applicants while the members of the opposite sex felt no threat to their self-esteem.

Given the many obstacles to accurate perception, what do people have to do to come across they way they intend to?

One study hints at an answer. In the study, published in 1998 in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, research subjects came into the lab to conduct a mock negotiation with one other person. Each party chose a specific goal for the negotiation, like “gain the liking of the other person” or “hold firm to my own personal opinions,” which they went into the negotiation trying to achieve, but weren’t necessarily trying to reveal to the other person.

After the negotiation, each party was asked what the other person’s goal was, which was an indication of how transparent the other person was. In the study, research subjects only guessed the goal of their partner correctly 26 percent of the time. Meanwhile, more than half of them thought that they were clearly relaying their goals and intentions to the other person. The lesson of this study is that people may think that they are being clear, but they’re not.

“If you want to solve the problem of perception,” Halvorson says, “it’s much more practical for you to decide to be a good sender of signals than to hope that the perceiver is going to go into phase two of perception. It’s not realistic to expect people to go to that effort..."

[click on the title for the full article] 

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Lisa A Romano's insight:

Psych 101 - it's all about the traffic signals people!!!!

 

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Julianna Bonola's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:12 AM

Have you ever misunderstood or misinterpreted what was happening for someone else?  This article might be a useful guide as to why.  

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It's the Relationship...

It's the Relationship... | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"I sometimes dread being introduced to other psychotherapists.

 

“Hi! Nice to meet you – you are a therapist too?!  That’s great – I do CBT, Motivational Interviewing and Behavioral Activation – what do you do?”

 

Uh.

 Umm.

 Shrug.

 

“I have an office…”  I’ll vague out and drift off.

 

When faced with the alphabet soup of “evidenced based psychotherapies” I find myself lost and speechless.

 

I don’t begrudge or devalue any of those interventions for the therapists and the clients that find them useful and meaningful.

 

But that isn’t what I do.

 

None of  the methodology, measures, the cognitive distortions or neuropsychological reprogrammings would have pulled me from the quagmire I inherited – there were only a few simple things that had any chance of aligning me with my soul’s mandate and the pursuit of meaning in my life: Image, Words, Metaphor,  Relationship.

 

I can’t eliminate behavior, and wouldn’t even dare arbitrate which behaviors are healthy or unhealthy. I can’t fix a damned thing. And I don’t practice therapy that fixes anything, because, frankly,  I never wanted to participate in a therapy or enter into a relationship with a therapist who wanted to fix me.

 

I can’t make anyone’s  problems go away, including my own. And as I get older, and watch myself revisit the same conflicts and complexes in  subtler forms I wonder if “change” in the sense that most people imagine it when they speak of psychotherapy, is possible at all, and if it is even desirable...."

 

[click on the title for the full article]

 

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Lisa A Romano's insight:

It’s the relationship that heals, the relationship that heals, the relationship that heals – my professional rosary.  ~ Yalom, I. (1989), Love’s Executioner, London: Penguin Books, p.91

 

Thank-you so much for this article.

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Looking for Problems Makes Us Tired - blogs.hbr.org (blog)

Looking for Problems Makes Us Tired - blogs.hbr.org (blog) | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it
New research identifies the costs of constant vigilance.

Via Luis Valdes
Lisa A Romano's insight:

Great to see more evidence based studies in org psych being popularised

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How Thinking Works: 10 Brilliant Cognitive Psychology Studies Everyone Should Know - PsyBlog

How Thinking Works: 10 Brilliant Cognitive Psychology Studies Everyone Should Know - PsyBlog | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it
How experts think, the power of framing, the miracle of attention, the weird world of cognitive biases and more...

Via Luis Valdes
Lisa A Romano's insight:

Benefits of popularising these studies are so many

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A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition: Why You Are Not Your Brain

A Brief Guide to Embodied Cognition: Why You Are Not Your Brain | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...As Lakoff points out, metaphors are more than mere language and literary devices, they are conceptual in nature and represented physically in the brain. As a result, such metaphorical brain circuitry can affect behavior. For example, in a study done by Yale psychologist John Bargh, participants holding warm as opposed to cold cups of coffee were more likely to judge a confederate as trustworthy after only a brief interaction. Similarly, at the University of Toronto, “subjects were asked to remember a time when they were either socially accepted or socially snubbed. Those with warm memories of acceptance judged the room to be 5 degrees warmer on the average than those who remembered being coldly snubbed. Another effect of Affection Is Warmth.” This means that we both physically and literary “warm up” to people.

The last few years have seen many complementary studies, all of which are grounded in primary experiences:

• Thinking about the future caused participants to lean slightly forward while thinking about the past caused participants to lean slightly backwards. Future is Ahead

• Squeezing a soft ball influenced subjects to perceive gender neutral faces as female while squeezing a hard ball influenced subjects to perceive gender neutral faces as male. Female is Soft

• Those who held heavier clipboards judged currencies to be more valuable and their opinions and leaders to be more important. Important is Heavy.

• Subjects asked to think about a moral transgression like adultery or cheating on a test were more likely to request an antiseptic cloth after the experiment than those who had thought about good deeds. Morality is Purity

Studies like these confirm Lakoff’s initial hunch – that our rationality is greatly influenced by our bodies in large part via an extensive system of metaphorical thought..."

 

[click on the title for the full article]

 

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Lisa A Romano's insight:

Psychology is a science...

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Jocelyn Stoller's curator insight, March 11, 2015 7:20 PM

You are your brain and its interaction with your body

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The Therapeutic Relationship: 7 Things That Help It Stand

The Therapeutic Relationship: 7 Things That Help It Stand | Psychology: the brain & behaviours | Scoop.it

"...[Τ]here are some therapists, and even psychiatrists, who are very far removed from their clients and the families they see. They either don’t know how to relate or simply don’t care. There are also some professionals who simply should not be in the field. Everyone has strengths and sometimes a person’s strengths are not found in this profession. Other people are very intelligent but lack a lot of emotional intelligence. Still, others get into this field to understand themselves or those around them and have very little interest in actually helping. Whatever the reason, there are those of us who thrive in this field and those of us who don’t. As a result, it’s important to be able to identify the qualities that makes a therapist successful at what they do. Successful includes being able to relate to clients, validate their feelings, show compassion and true concern, and be interested in learning about the person behind the label (i.e., a diagnosis or long history of problems). Overtime, I have developed a listing, based on families and clients, of qualities that make a good therapist. Here are the 7 things that contribute to a strong therapeutic relationship:

 

1. Authenticity..."

[click on the title for the full article]

 


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Frontiers | Potential self-regulatory mechanisms of yoga for psychological health | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Research suggesting the beneficial effects of yoga on myriad aspects of psychological health has proliferated in recent years, yet there is currently no overarching framework by which to understand yoga's potential beneficial effects. Here we provide a theoretical framework and systems-based network model of yoga that focuses on integration of top-down and bottom-up forms of self-regulation. We begin by contextualizing yoga in historical and contemporary settings, and then detail how specific components of yoga practice may affect cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and autonomic output under stress through an emphasis on interoception and bottom-up input, resulting in physical and psychological health. The model describes yoga practice as a comprehensive skillset of synergistic process tools that facilitate bidirectional feedback and integration between high- and low-level brain networks, and afferent and re-afferent input from interoceptive processes (somatosensory, viscerosensory, chemosensory). From a predictive coding perspective we propose a shift to perceptual inference for stress modulation and optimal self-regulation. We describe how the processes that sub-serve self-regulation become more automatized and efficient over time and practice, requiring less effort to initiate when necessary and terminate more rapidly when no longer needed. To support our proposed model, we present the available evidence for yoga affecting self-regulatory pathways, integrating existing constructs from behavior theory and cognitive neuroscience with emerging yoga and meditation research. This paper is intended to guide future basic and clinical research, specifically targeting areas of development in the treatment of stress-mediated psychological disorders.

Via Kasia Hein-Peters
Lisa A Romano's insight:

So positive to have yoga finally researched for its valid health and neural health intervention effects

 

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