Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies
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Rise of the mobile-first social network: US stats

Rise of the mobile-first social network: US stats | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

The majority of social media sites are seeing far more traffic and time spent coming from mobile devices than from desktops.


Via siobhan-o-flynn
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

You've probably noticed, but mobile devices have smaller screens than desktops and laptops (at least currently).  This means that producers have to consider a host of design issues.  "Mobile friendly" isn't enough.  Content has to be created to be brain-friendly to ensure usability and engagement.   Usability and engagement are not the same thing.  

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Stay Happy On Social Media: Share And Scroll With Purpose

Stay Happy On Social Media: Share And Scroll With Purpose | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
To keep your scroll under control, Beauty for a Purpose consulted the experts on six steps to stay positive and post social media updates with grace.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Don't buy into the myth that social media is the path to mental illness, depression or overwhelming envy.  It is just part of our social world.  We are all imperfect and different.  That's part of the beauty of people. That doesn't mean we don't aspire to be our best selves.  From a positive psychology perspective, practicing our best selves not only generates positive emotions, it helps us visualize the path to our goals.  If you start looking at social media posts as people's goals rather than bragging, you will have more appreciation for them and yourself.  If you find other people's post annoying, reclaim  your power: unfriend, unfollow or log-off.  If you wouldn't hang out with them offline, so why do you torment yourself with toxic friends on Instagram or Facebook.  Pro user tip: evaluate your own posts.  Are you guilty of the same kind of posts that you don't like from other people?  


Avon calls this #beautyforapurpose, but we all know (thanks, Grandma!) that beauty is only skin deep.  Positive psychology tells us that finding purpose and meaning in life is the best path to self-esteem and satisfaction with life.  So try #livingforapurpose.  Thanks @avon for posting the tips.  As Eleanor Roosevelt supposedly said, no one can make you feel bad without your help.

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Future of #VR Content poll & AR/VR headsets may not be required by 2030: IEEE survey | Digit.in

Future of #VR Content poll & AR/VR headsets may not be required by 2030: IEEE survey | Digit.in | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
More than half the participants surveyed by IEEE during CES 2016 believe that by 2030, AR/VR technology will reach a point where headsets will not be needed

Via Gary Hayes
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

From Todd Richard in the article: VR will be successful when developers figure out how to "stabilize" the relationship between digital's 0s and 1s and analogue (real time) experience.  The binding agent is story.  

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Gary Hayes's curator insight, January 26, 5:04 PM

Quote "

Participants were also asked to rank the first place they would visit using virtual reality. 30% said that they would visit the Moon, Mars or outer space first, while 19% said that they would rather travel through time by viewing a different time period. Viewing a sporting event came at 18% followed by popular cities, and extreme remote locations at 16% and 11% respectively. 

In addition, 58% of the participants believed that the US will be the first to reach mass adoption of AR/VR technology. The US was followed by Japan and China at 21% and 12% respectively. Brazil, India and the UK were also considered, but made up only a small percentage of the results. "

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A psychologist explains why Victoria’s Secret is killing it on Instagram

A psychologist explains why Victoria’s Secret is killing it on Instagram | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
It's not just about sex appeal.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Victoria's Secret is a master class in how to elevate a brand and reconstruct social meaning.  

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, November 20, 2015 11:50 PM


Megan Willett:  "Of course sex appeal has something to do with it, but there are plenty of sexy Instagram accounts that don't have nearly as many followers.  So how did Victoria's Secret get so popular?"

Digital Communication Students's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:19 AM

The psychology of media explains us the reasons why the VS Instagram account is one of the most popular on the Internet. It has really as much followers as the nike account has. Nevertheless, the reasons why are understandable. 

António Maneira's curator insight, December 5, 2015 11:22 AM
Social media meets fashion!
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A psychologist explains how to organize your computer desktop for optimal productivity

A psychologist explains how to organize your computer desktop for optimal productivity | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
If your desktop wallpaper is no longer visible, we're judging you.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

It's easy to forget or overlook our cognitive and perceptive limitations and predispositions when it comes to productivity.  Not to mention the need to organize the pencil drawer.  Physician, heal thyself!

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Baby News For YouTube Couple Accused of Faking Miscarriage

Baby News For YouTube Couple Accused of Faking Miscarriage | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Just two months ago, YouTube vloggers Sam and Nia, a married couple in Terrell, Texas, went viral when Sam surprised Nia with her own pregnancy by secretly testing the urine she’d left in their toilet. Sam captured the stunt in a YouTube video that garnered more than 15 million views. Then, three days
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

"Fake it 'til you make it" may be a good strategy for getting over anxiety before a meeting, but it's NOT a good strategy when you're selling authenticity on YouTube.  The Internet is powerful--it can propel an unknown with thousands of viewers, but with celebrity comes scrutiny. Those same eyes will be looking through a magnifying lens.  Social media relationships operate with the same rules as offline ones.  They are social contracts that thrive on honesty and are destroyed by deceit. 

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Waiting on an email? Why it takes some people SO long to respond

Waiting on an email? Why it takes some people SO long to respond | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
What's the best time to send an email? And why does it seem like it takes forever for someone to respond? A recent study finds that email response time varies greatly by age.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

What we do doesn't explain the "why."  Before we make rash value judgments about what is "best" and what constitutes some aberrant or deficit behavior, take a deep breath.  Email length and response time are influenced by context, ability to prioritize, response need, expectations within relationships, mental models and filtering styles.  Just sayin'   This is a great study to begin the next level of inquiry about the 'why' so we can get to the 'so what.'   #mediapsych 

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The power of selfie marketing (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com

The power of selfie marketing (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Selfies are a way to create immediate stakeholders.  WAAY back in 2013 (doesn't that seem like eons ago from a social media perspective?), I published Branding with Selfies on Psychology Today arguing for the power of integrating selfies into marketing and branding strategies. I like how invited participation extends our concept of the "selfie" from its early technophobic labels of "narcissistic attention seekers with low self esteem who need a life"  (Nevermind that some of those things are mutually exclusive) and shifts our vision to how we capture personal experience.  As an advocate for selfies as mindfulness and gratitude tools,  I love to see mental models busted open.


As John Bohan's article reiterates, selfies are the ultimate WOM.  They trigger all kinds of social influence--social proof and social validation--practically screaming "We all like this, so you should too!"  It's fun to see the different approaches to selfie-imagery and gives psychologists a whole new realm to analyze for impact and meaning. #mediapsychology.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, October 18, 2015 2:33 PM


John Bohan:  "From Pope Francis to Darth Vader, from Obama to Kim Kardashian, everyone seems to be taking selfies" ...

Kristin Russell's curator insight, December 10, 2015 10:18 AM

This article talks about the power of a selfie. Selfies are so well know today that they are a great way for marketers to get involved with social media. For example, by saying send a selfie into our website and the best selfie could win money allows the viewer to do something common in their lives and connect with the business at the same time. Selfies are great because they are evidence that someone is actually where they say they are.

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Home

Home | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Revolutionalizing the way we're seen in the meadow, through our relationsheeps
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The Sheeple parody website is hilarious and is a cautionary tale on several levels: 1) everyone wants their message to go viral.  Viral is not equal to positive.  Viral just means LOTS of people here about it, so be careful what you wish for.  2) Sheeple not only rhymes with Peeple, but it has an implicit message in how we people respond to trends.  Bad "ratings" can do irreparable psychological and personal damage to others because people are, well, like sheep.  They follow the crowd because our brains are lazy and we assume that the opinions of others actually imply validity or "truth".  It takes cognitive effort to think for yourselves and most of us are too busy to think through everything.  The value (or danger) in recommender programs and curation tools is that they short circuit the judgment process. 3) there were no psychologists on the development team. but technology is about facilitating human goals and needs  I could have told them at the back of the napkin stage about the human behavior issues in their plan.  A good designer/developer designs for the audience.  That means thinking through who the consumers are and what they want, not just what you, the developer, thinks or wants. (Remember Kodak and film cameras?)  Sheep don't traditionally wear blinders, but the whole point of consumer-centric design is to create a usable and valuable experience.  Self-focused thinking narrow one's ability to anticipate, like a chess game, the unintended as well an intended consequences. 4) A half-baked idea ends up being cud for others and is chewed beyond recognition--parody being one of the higher art forms.

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Why Facebook hoaxes fool so many people, according to science

Why Facebook hoaxes fool so many people, according to science | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
The science behind why smart people fall for dumb social media hoaxes
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Hoaxes are cyber-bullying.  People are hard wired to respond to fear. The hoax message operates on several levels--the fear of change in a social contract---being charged by Facebook is a trust violation of our understanding of their social contract with us; the fear of our vulnerability if our information were shared; and the general fear that we can't control our environment and protect ourselves. The hoaxes travel across networks, shared because by sharing we feel an increased sense of control by taking action, even if it is just to "sound the alarm."  We also feel less afraid if we are not alone in any situation.  Sharing and seeing others' responses normalizes our own emotions and experience.  Sharing is also the only way to get feedback that we are, we hope, wrong.  The best news is that it is, in fact, a hoax.  The downside for Facebook is that these types of hoaxes leave us feeling a bit manipulated and emotionally abused that can't help but be associated with the social network--even if they have nothing to do with it.

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Most Millennials Resist the ‘Millennial’ Label

Most Millennials Resist the ‘Millennial’ Label | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Survey Report Millennials will soon become the nation’s largest living generation. They already have surpassed Generation X to make up the largest share of t
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

This title is misleading.  If only 40% of the Millennials thing of themselves as belonging to that group, it means that 60% of the respondents are describing somebody OTHER than themselves.  

What they are reporting here is not how 'Millennials' feel about themselves, but how they perceive the Millennials cohort.  That’s an entirely different thing.  

The Millennials have been villainized and labeled by multiple groups—older generations, companies who are not adjusting to the new social technologies environment and disgruntled marketers who haven't adapted to the shifting priorities of a demographic coming of age in a continually evolving culture.  It is quite common for older generations to complain about the shortcoming of the younger generation.  (Boomers should remember this well.)  Labeling an entire generation as narcissists is not only ageism, but it means whatever we're using to judge narcissism is woefully out of date.  Yet we blithely toss these words around in an otherwise politically correct environment. This "othering" of the 18-34 year olds been compounded by the fact that the Millennials have grown up as the first generation of digital natives. They have had an unprecedented access to information and socialization compared to amy earlier generations.  In fact, they don't remember it any other way.  This, by the way, isn't their fault.  This access has changed the way all of us communicate and our basic assumptions about participation.  The Millennials just didn't have to unlearn anything to figure it out.  Social technologies have challenged existing organizational and hierarchical structures, business models and operating procedures.  Thus the perceptions of the Millennials is complicated by the general technophobia that accompanies the adoption of new technologies.  Gen Y is also the most culturally diverse generation in US history, meaning that within this broad age range there are likely stronger cultural, geographic and ethnic allegiances that far out weigh the age designation.

Gen Y is also aged 18 to 34, which means that developmentally, they are still in the process of identity-construction, establishing independent lives and careers and doing so at a time when the there is a good deal of social and political discontent.  They are having more trouble finding good jobs and the cost of living is high, making it harder than ever to strike out on their own.  At the same time, many have significant debt from the high cost of education.  They were raised by Boomer parents, committed to doing things differently than the generation before them and are now complaining about the results.  Loudly.  Everywhere.  

Thus a report like this suggests that Gen Y/Millennials don’t share a common sense of being a ‘group,’ that they have started to believe the bad press about this so-called “Millennial” generation but do not necessarily see that as being about themselves.  I'm happy to see those low identification numbers with the negative labels of being Gen Y.  As all kind of research shows, if you want the best out of people, quit telling them how awful, self-focused and greedy they are.  Research on that age group also shows them to be more collaborative and socially conscious.  Marketers frequently discuss the social marketing, social entrepreneurship and CSR programs to attract this demographic -- whatever we call them.

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Social Media Marketing: Why Practical Experience Will Always Top Book Knowledge

Social Media Marketing: Why Practical Experience Will Always Top Book Knowledge | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
In Social Media Marketing experience counts more than book knowledge. Following best practices and rules may not yield the results you seek.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

I'm going to beg to differ on this premise. WHAT knowledge you are trying to apply matters a lot--best practices come and go with the tools.  Psychology doesn't.  


Thus I totally agree about the difficulty and often irrelevance of trying to extrapolate best practices from what others have done.  It's like navigating using your rear view mirror. At the same time, I'm all for learning from experience and mistakes. Practical experience is how you learn to apply theories--how you learn to adjust strategies so you are actually doing what you intend.  The theories that help the most come from psychology and understanding what drives human behavior.  The missteps coms when we don't align the tools with human behavior so that we can intersect the audience and satisfy goals and needs. #mediapsychology.  With all due respect, practical experience will trump best practices when the environment is static.  When it goes through significant shifts, media psychology is the only thing that will get you out in front.  www.audiencepsych.com 

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Media Psychology Syllabus, 2015 - Rutledge

Media Psychology Syllabus, 2015 - Rutledge | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Foundations in Media Psychology Syllabus. This is an overview course in media psychology, created and taught by Dr. Pamela Rutledge at Fielding Graduate University.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

This is my updated syllabus for an introductory course in media psychology, Foundations in Media Psychology, at Fielding Graduate University.  It's hard to narrow down such a broad field to deliver in a 12 week course.  This also is just an entry point to Fielding's other courses that deep dive into specific areas, such as brand psychology & transmedia storytelling, audience engagement, immersive media.  I'm sure I'm missed some important stuff.  If you've ideas, I'd love to hear.  


FYI - This is my week for info sessions.  Tomorrow, you can learn about the Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement certificate program 6/15 4pm PT (also with Jerri Lynn Hogg); Wednesday 6/16 4pm PT is the Master's Degree Program overview--Why Media Psychology is Critical to Your Career Success and Thursday 6/17 4:00 pm PT, I'm talking about Brand Psychology: Using Archetypes to Tell Your Brand Story.  The first info session webinars since we moved to Zoom.  You can register on the Fielding site so they'll send you a reminder -- also feel free email me for info.  I'd be delighted to have you join me just to talk brands, storytelling and media psych.  No obligations!!

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How to make your life look like your Instagram feed

How to make your life look like your Instagram feed | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Instagram feeds — those treasure-troves of personal photo galleries — often are bonanzas of decadent meals, brilliant sunsets and perfectly poised centerpieces. These slices of life might be authentic moments, but often our daily life doesn't resemble these carefully curated slide shows.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

There is tremendous power in seeing the glass half full.  Yet when we look at social media use (ours and others), we start from a negative bias that it is somehow inherently wrong, self-focused or bragging. Why not reframe our interpretations and consider the important role of visualizing the upside to make positive change? Maybe all those happy Facebook pictures are how we WANT to be and are reminders of the important things in life--not bragging after all. Posting publicly makes a commitment more real because we have shared it with others.  

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The age of on-demand here? NBC try to embarrass Netflix but the opposite ensues

The age of on-demand here? NBC try to embarrass Netflix but the opposite ensues | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
The network dropped numbers for OITNB, Jessica Jones, Master of None...

Via Gary Hayes
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Two lessons here: 1) When a big guy takes on a little guy, the result gives the little guy more power.  Numbers don't matter. 2) Calling attention to these "secret numbers" creates unearned media for Netflix.  (Nice job, NBC) and 3) Being on the offensive when you're the "big guy" usually looks just that, offensive.

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Gary Hayes's curator insight, January 18, 8:28 AM

Quote "Among Symphony's data conclusions: Jessica Jones averaged about 4.8 million views an episode, Master of None about 3.9 million, and Narcos about 3.2 million. Orange Is the New Black, meanwhile, supposedly averaged just 644,000 viewers for its third season, though the Symphony measurement occurred many months after that third season launched in June. (Netflix has previously said Orange is its most watched show.)"

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We must mind our language when it comes to evil fanatics - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

We must mind our language when it comes to evil fanatics - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Readers have inquired about the use of language in reports of the horrific massacres in Paris. Not particularly just in the Belfast Telegraph, but in the media generally.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

#MediaPsychology addresses the meaning of words, symbols and platforms, in other words, media experience.  It's a shame that it takes "evil fanatics" to underscore the importance of #mediapsych.   Psychology applied to media experience is equally essential in developing effective media and technology for positive goals, such as education, organizational communication, social change, advocacy, user experience, design, brand messaging and entertainment.  As per article, however, most wars are about conflicting ideas, affiliation, and a sense of greater purpose and moral views.  The weapons are just the manifestation irreconcilable belief differences.  


From the article:

Mr Fauverge is a policeman, not a wordsmith or a propagandist. He spoke not long after the drama and we can understand his lapses. But future police media training might include some media psychology.

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Here's what happened when psychologists took away people's phones

Here's what happened when psychologists took away people's phones | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
VIDEO: Have we lost the ability to entertain ourselves only with our thoughts?
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The conclusion on the video is that we've lost the ability to enjoy ourselves with only our thought for short periods of time.  First, I guess, I'd like to know compared to what.  Subjects were in a closed room not overlooking a grand vista. But that aside, for people with ADD like me, sitting with no ability to interact is incredibly (!) uncomfortable--and I presume that falling asleep was discouraged.   Why not call it curiosity or experimentation combined with the presence of the shock button (which by Wilson's admission isn't that strong). Maybe I'm weird, but that doesn't seem odd to me to give it a go and explore the sensation.

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Craig Shifrin's curator insight, November 27, 2015 4:15 AM

fantasy, projection, new personas all a part of when media replaces real life.

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New Facebook buttons designs | Icon Design contest by DesignCrowd

New Facebook buttons designs | Icon Design contest by DesignCrowd | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
DesignCrowd asked its community of talented designers create new Facebook buttons that users could click to communicate how they feel about a page post.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Nothing shows the energy, humor and creativity of the human spirit better than crowdsourcing.  Check out the suggested designs for new Facebook buttons in a DesignCrowd project.  The ideas do a great job of capturing the myriad of human responses to TMI and 'it's all about me.'

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Engaging Storytelling's Future Banks on a Balance Between New Tech and the Analog (see correct link below)

Engaging Storytelling's Future Banks on a Balance Between New Tech and the Analog (see correct link below) | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
PSFK speaks with author and digital culture guru Frank Rose on the highs and lows of engaging storytelling tools like virtual reality
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Article at: http://www.psfk.com/2015/10/future-of-engaging-storytelling-createtech-conference-frank-rose-wired.html

Frank Rose has the ability to step back from all the excitement and 'shiny penny' aspects of technology and hone in on the critical experiential elements.  Art, film, image, music etc. have always been about shifting perspectives.  Technology enables new levels of experience.  Simple things, like sound added to film, were as mind-boggling an experience as VR.  But technology also needs to enable core drivers.  Where well produced VR gives visual control and good storytelling in VR can add meaning, it will be critical for developers to not overlook the primacy of social connection.

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No, Your Children Aren’t Becoming Digital Zombies

No, Your Children Aren’t Becoming Digital Zombies | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Should parents of teenagers be worried about smartphones and social media? A new survey of research provides encouraging news.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

I hate to say "I told you so" (well, in this case, I don't really). This study reaffirms my position: We spend too much time making an artificial distinction between offline and online social worlds.  People are driven by core instincts--social connection is one of the big ones.  We choose the best methods we have to further our goals.  Given the choice, most people will choose face to face for maintaining relationships.  However, that isn't always the best choice.  Staying in touch frequently is more important than how you do it.   Texting is much more efficient (safer and less caloric, frankly) than hanging out at the local mall or in the parking lot of In 'n Out Burger. Therefore it allows for better maintenance of relationships, providing the "glue" between F2F contact.  Frequency is essential for developing closeness and trust in relationships.

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Rankings - 2015 - Best Global Brands - Best Brands - Interbrand

Rankings - 2015 - Best Global Brands - Best Brands - Interbrand | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Ranking the world’s most valuable brands.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Consider the strength and coherence of brand story along with Interbrand's other key components: an analysis of the financial performance of the branded products or services, the role the brand plays in purchase decisions, and the brand's competitive strength. Do they align?

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The new 'Yelp for people' app is a psychologist's nightmare

The new 'Yelp for people' app is a psychologist's nightmare | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
You've probably heard about Peeple, the new app that lets you rate everyone from your friends to neighbors to ex-romantic partners the same way you rate businesses on Yelp.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

This is weird for me to bash an app, because usually I'm the one saying that technology is a great.  However, there are limits and this Peeple is one.  I say this because it violates psychological fundamentals.  Peeple is a bad idea and is not going to work out well.  Consider the concerns over Facebook instituting the “Dislike” button and extend that to a rating system.  


I understand their intentions:

"Julia Cordray and Nicole McCullough, the app's co-founders, thought it would be useful to research people before you began a relationship with them the same way you would research a car or anything else before you committed to buying it. McCullough, a mother of two, said she created the app because she wanted a way to decide whether or not she could trust her neighbors"

But Cordray and McCullough are either naïve or mistaken if they are relying on Yelping your fellow citizens as a source of accurate information rather than a free-for-all.  The Washington Post reported that this app was driven the women's desire to promote empathy.  For anyone who thinks this is a manifestation of empathy; it is not.  Empathy means viewing the world through the other person’s eyes, not your own.  This is the exact opposite.  

The basic premise of peeple violates a lot of fundamental social rules.   Etiquette, although always an evolving set of norms, exists for a reason.  It facilitates social interaction.  It allows people to know the “rules of the game.”  This app, however well intentioned, is more likely to have negative than positive outcomes.  It opens the door for all kinds of bullying, whether it’s “social shaming,” disgruntled acquaintances, general trolls and haters or 'traditional' bullies.  (I make this distinction because bullies generally know their targets, whereas trolls and haters receive their emotional pay-off from spewing negativity without targets to get people to react.)  


The human brain is hardwired to react to social evaluations.  We care how other people think about us at a deep, instinctive level.  Social collaboration and social knowledge have been and continue to be critical to our physical and emotional survival.  Our world has changed since we were wandering the Savannahs fending off sabre tooth tigers, but our reactions remain the same.  Social wounds have the same impact as physical wounds.  They genuinely and literally hurt.


“Rating” people without a relational exchange is gossip at its worst.  It removes all context.  People fall back on instinctive heuristics all the time, such as voting the most attractive people, expressing double standards for gender behavior and public representation (like we see in the response to selfies), and other evidence of our inability to overcome inherent cognitive and biological bias and instincts.  


Honest feedback that is supposed to “help” others will not be heard because it will be instinctively felt as an attack.  Few people will give credence to this type of rating as valid evaluation, as recommendations are only as good as the person giving it.  Anyone who makes judgments about who their children should associate with based on Peeple-ratings should be reported to child protective services.  I hope it is youthful exuberance that leads them to think that "trust" is a function of hearsay and not a relational exchange.   Peeple will, however, provide an unhealthy sport to those who enjoy mud-slinging or need a new drinking game.

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Become a Peanuts Character With 20th Century Fox's 'Peanutize Me' Site

Become a Peanuts Character With 20th Century Fox's 'Peanutize Me' Site | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Avatar Maker Follows in Footsteps of Simpsons Marketing
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Peanutize Me! is a great example of creating content that links brand and identity.  High on entertainment, low on "sell.'  Fox Films invites you to translate yourself into a character in Charlie Brown's world.  In order to create an avatar, which, by the way, is fun, you have to evaluate yourself against the options available.  Which hair is 'me'?  Or not me?   As crazy as this sounds, your brain is off on a journey.  Whether your avatar is somewhat accurate or if you get wildly creative doesn't matter.  You have to self-reference to create either.  You are already projecting yourself into the world you now share with Charlie Brown. That simple act avatar creation has changed the relevance of Peanuts.  Will you go see the movie?  I don't know.  But either way, your meaning-making antennae are sensitized to pick up references to your new world.  The fact that you are in it means it's something to share. #brandpsychology #mediapsychology

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MLB.com Utilizes Virtual Mirrors To Promote All-Star Game Apparel

MLB.com Utilizes Virtual Mirrors To Promote All-Star Game Apparel | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
With the Major League Baseball All-Star break in full-swing, MLB.com and Aramark leveraged multiple Virtual Mirror stations to promote All-Star Game apparel.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Major League Baseball (MLB) is has created a very clever way of extending their brand story--providing virtual mirrors that fans and potential fans to experience themselves in MLB gear.  In other words, fans experience embodied branding; identity expansion though virtual reality.  The best brands create a story that becomes our story. The ability to 'wear' brand gear intensifies the shared story and immersive 'fan' experience.

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The Science of Memorable Presentations

Learn more about "The Science of Memorable Presentations" by checking out the Ethos3 blog post on this topic: http://ethr.ee/1ULMrxy Ethos3 is a presentation …

Via Baiba Svenca
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Another way of interpreting these tips is to think of the presentation as telling a story using all the tools at your disposal to focus the listener and engage emotion--structure, image, data and audience need.

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José Alexander's curator insight, September 29, 2015 5:44 AM

añada su visión ...

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from #transmediascoop
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The art of finding an audience

The art of finding an audience | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Almost to the day a year ago I wrote a post on audience engagement, talking about five points I believe are essential when it comes to reaching the point of meaningful interaction with an engaged a...

Via Simon Staffans
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Simon, I'm always a fan of your stuff, but I'm especially loving your insights and endorsement of the persona approach. The psychology of persona development is a subject near and dear to my heart.  It plays a big role in what we teach in the certificate program on Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement I designed with Dr. Jerri Lynn Hogg at Fielding Graduate University.  We work with story and 'the storied nature of life' as the core expression of a brand's values; similarly we use the psychology of motivations, needs and goals to understand the audience and as the basis for developing the persona story to get the right "fit" between the brand/cause/entertainment property and the audience. (We use 'brand' broadly to mean any encapsulated idea, from social cause or entertainment experience to commercial or organizational brand.) If you are telling your core story, it is also your brand promise. We all, as consumers, have stories about how any consumed experience integrates, inspires, or changes our personal story trajectory.  Lots of science on how the brain processes using story (i.e. narrative structure) to make meaning.  By creating a brand-audience link through psych fundamentals built on story, by definition it builds the trust and authenticity--creating a relationship of respect and reciprocity. As you well know from what you do, the development of a clear story arc with emotional purpose and intention allows you to construct and tell your story across media to create a larger experience or storyworld, whether a developed canon or an internal psychological experience. At the end of the day, identifying the psychological drivers on both sides (story and audience) makes the story resonate deeply with the audience which is experienced as respect.

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Simon Staffans's curator insight, September 10, 2015 3:30 AM

Some thoughts on a method I'm starting to apply - comments welcome!