Psychology of Med...
Follow
6.0K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from #transmediascoop
onto Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies
Scoop.it!

Once Upon a Soda - Forbes

Once Upon a Soda - Forbes | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Consulting firm Starlight Runner helps movie directors like James Cameron--and big brands from Coca-Cola to Mattel to Pepperidge Farm--keep their stories straight.

Via Simon Staffans
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Great article reinforces that it's all about the story.

more...
Simon Staffans's curator insight, January 25, 2013 8:26 AM

A look at Starlightrunner, well worth the attention!

Margaret Doyle's curator insight, January 25, 2013 9:59 AM

Recognition of this kind is wonderful to see. The Transmedia storyteller is slowly but surely being understood by business and seen as the invaluable partner in their business strategy, brand development, and culture that they can be. 

Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies
Where technology & media meet human experience
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

How News Anchor's Difficult On-Air Cancer Revelation Could Help Others

How News Anchor's Difficult On-Air Cancer Revelation Could Help Others | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
When Illinois news anchor Dave Benton made a major on-air announcement recently, it was reportage at its most personal: Benton, 51, revealed that his doctors had told him that he has just four to six months left to live — the latest, most heartbreaking chapter in what has been an ongoing report about his yearlong battle with brain cancer. Benton, who has been with Champaign’s WCIA-3 news team for almost nine years, completed radiation treatment in February, but a new tumor grew back.  “We’ve got some serious stuff to discuss, and we are an open book, and we wanted to let you guys in on something that we’ve known for a while,” Benton’s co-anchor Jennifer Roscoe told viewers at the end of their nightly newscast on Thursday. Related: Layoff Letter to Woman With Cancer Causes Outcry “Basically my cancer is back and it’s too big for surgery and radiation,” Benton said, his voice shaky in an attempt to contain his emotion. “Doctors have told me that I may have four to six months to live.” He added that he’ll be trying a new antibody chemotherapy treatment to help slow the tumor’s growth.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Media can provide a powerful platform for modeling course in the face of adversity.  Dave Benton and other like him help people overcome the stigma of illness and encourage a sense of empowerment rather than give in to victimhood.  Positive emotions can play a significant part in the recovery and the trajectory of illness and, in cases like these, who is to say that Benton is destined to the course doctors predict given the amount of positive energy, love and prayers coming his way.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Meet the daredevil photographers racking up thousands of Instagram followers

Meet the daredevil photographers racking up thousands of Instagram followers | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Their subject is an urban world from above, captured for thousands of social media followers.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The line has been blurry between art and life for some time.  What has changed is that we (all of us!) can now more readily and artistically capture life. New dimensions to defining art.  Is it the intention of the creator or the perception of the audience?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Post-Traumatic Gifted: Moving from Scarcity to Abundance: Russell Redenbaugh at TEDxBend - YouTube

Russell lost his sight at the age of 16 and has learned to "read the world" without being able to "see" any of it. Russell has a skill for learning -- not ju...
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Positive psychology in action: Good friend Russell Redenbaugh is a 'poster hero' for positive psychology and the importance of resilience, purpose, courage fueling action.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Teaching digital citizenship in a 'yakking' world | Al Jazeera America

Teaching digital citizenship in a 'yakking' world | Al Jazeera America | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Apps like Yik Yak, which has sparked mass cyberbullying incidents from coast to coast, give new urgency to cyber civics
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Brilliant coverage of Cyberwise's CyberCivics approach to preparing kids for navigating the digital world.  Highlights Diana Graber, co-founder with Cynthia Lieberman, of Cyberwise, both are FGU #mediapsychology alums (and friends & colleagues).  Great work and much deserved attention!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
Scoop.it!

Many Ways to Tell a Story: How Transmedia Is Transforming Education In and Out of Classrooms

Many Ways to Tell a Story: How Transmedia Is Transforming Education In and Out of Classrooms | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Transmedia approaches encourage (or even force) people to actively acknowledge and design for a fluid and multi-dimensional, rather than linear, media environment.  For the human brain, stories are not constrained by what's on the page. Transmedia begins to replicate how we think and encourages producers to innovate in each platform to create multiple touchpoints that facilitate our natural ability to imagine, project, expand and experience.   

more...
Marilú Aranda Landa's curator insight, June 12, 5:18 AM

:)

Cheryl Frose's curator insight, June 12, 3:03 PM

Transmedia, a broad descriptive word that literally translated means “across media” and encompasses many strategies that transverse industries, is generally regarded as the use of multiple media platforms to tell a story or story experience. Though the word “transmedia” is thought to have entertainment franchise origins, its adaptation for education purposes is both valuable and becoming more and more common. While teachers like Sansing are using coding and programming in their language arts instruction, others are taking advantage of increasingly sophisticated apps and interactive media for classroom use.

David Collet's curator insight, June 12, 6:28 PM

I guess this another favorite topic for me. Imagine using transmedia to teach maths and include cross over language components. After all maths has a language of its own.

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Lean Content
Scoop.it!

A Great Content Strategy's Anatomy

A Great Content Strategy's Anatomy | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Creating and cultivating content regularly can be overwhelming, but having a clear content strategy helps you to be a signal instead of noise on the web.

Via Ally Greer
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

We advocate persona-fication--persona development--to better identify and understand your audience.  Here's a great article on content strategy that speaks to the value of personas.  Students sometimes struggle with understanding why a 'made-up person' is going to be of any value, particularly since we all have inherent cognitive biases that color our judgment.  


There is no doubt that bias will influence persona development.  But everyone has developed a persona whether they admit it or not--it's living in their brain as the assumption of who they are marketing too.  Too often the lack of articulation increases the bias, not decreases it.  Benefits of creating a persona publicly is to compare them with others in the team AND the audience, in other words to expose your bias.   Qualitative researchers keep a journal during data collection and analysis for this very reason--the journal chronicles the researcher's perspective to bring potential biases to light.  It is exactly when the marketing team has little in common with the audience who uses a product that creating a persona has value for two reasons: 1) you test the persona in the market against real people and 2) you can (although not all do) externalize yourself from the persona--step aside and have a dialogue, much in the gestalt therapy fashion,.  When done with proper guidance (i.e. someone who is trained in this kind of stuff), these approaches can provide new and often startling perspectives.  


Personas don't always work.  Nothing is foolproof.  The 'right' persona doesn't guarantee that your product is any good or that your messaging is very salient or sticky.  There are other skills required besides persona development.  Going through a persona development exercise, however, is likely to have gotten you closer than you would have otherwise.  

more...
Enrique Robles's curator insight, June 10, 9:16 AM

very like

Beth Kanter's curator insight, June 10, 11:36 AM

Love the advice about personas

Emmanuel 'Manny' Gigante's curator insight, June 11, 10:22 AM

YOUR #roadmap  thanks @Scoop.it

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
Scoop.it!

Can Binge-Viewing TV Actually Be Good for Kids? Amazon Has a Plan

Can Binge-Viewing TV Actually Be Good for Kids? Amazon Has a Plan | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Journalists and society-at-large do #Amazon and viewers a huge disservice by tagging kid-centric content as '#binge-viewing' as if putting the viewer in control of what he/she watches is a bad thing--not to mention that it has nothing to do with what Amazon is trying to accomplish with their programming for preschoolers.  


Creators working with Amazon have intentionally tried to step out of their adult bias and look through eyes of preschoolers.  Their goal is to create engaging content that triggers curiosity and creativity.   This is the same approach I advocate for storytelling and central to the persona development and audience profiling in the courses & workshops we teach via Fielding's Masters program.  The fact that Amazon streaming allows for viewer controlled consumption encourages other activities because there is no #FOMO by playing through scheduled broadcasts.  Seriously, how is this even remotely negative?  When will we get over blaming the audience for exercising choice in content consumption?  I get how this is disruptive to current business models and how media companies might not be thrilled at having to be more creative to earn attention and loyalty, but consumers should be celebrating not labeling and journalists should get on board.

more...
The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, May 26, 1:00 AM


Ben Travers:  "With the studio's first ever original kids' shows debuting this summer, Amazon is trying to break into children’s programming from a groundbreaking new angle: long-term education."

Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, May 27, 1:08 AM

 Tara Sorensen, Head of Kids Programming at Amazon Studios:

:

"We're not asking them to sit in front of the television and tie them to a block of programming [like with standard broadcast television]. They can pause it.

They can rewatch it. It offers up a nice amount of flexibility, so I don't think it's just about keeping them in front of a 'screen' for us."

Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Words that get content shared on social media

Words that get content shared on social media | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Want your Twitter followers to retweet something? Just ask them politely. For Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+, however, you’ll need to modify how you phrase your message.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

#MediaPsych minute: Brain words are behavioral triggers. The words that get shared trigger our instinctive brain, which is driven to satisfy fundamental needs, i.e. rewards (free, improved, how to), avoiding scarcity (hurry, limited), personal impact or relevance (You), social connection (social, share), alert or change (words ending in 'ed') and affiliation and respect (please, follow).  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Instructional Design vs. Online Pedagogy

Instructional Design vs. Online Pedagogy | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
A colleague recently asked me about the difference between instructional design and online pedagogy. We’d been in conversation about learning, and I blithely remarked that these two fields had impo...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

It's important to make the distinction between learning fundamentals that transcend environments and how to construct a learning experience effective for specific content, context and audience.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Tracking Transmedia
Scoop.it!

Cellphones ignite a 'reading revolution' in poor countries

Cellphones ignite a 'reading revolution' in poor countries | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

"Illiteracy isn't a major issue for much of the Western world, but it remains endemic in many developing countries, where incomes are low and books are scarce. That may be changing, though, thanks to the spread of mobile technologies that have made books more accessible than ever before — something that UNESCO, in a new report, describes as a veritable "reading revolution."


The report, released today, examines the reading habits of nearly 5,000 mobile-phone users in seven countries — Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Zimbabwe — where the average illiteracy rate among children is 20 percent, and 34 percent among adults. (The US, by comparison, has an adult illiteracy rate of around three percent.) UNESCO describes the survey as the largest ever undertaken on mobile reading in the developing world, and its results are encouraging: people are reading more, they're reading to their children, and they're hungry for more content...."


Via siobhan-o-flynn
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

People spend so much time worrying about the negative impact of mobile technologies, that it's easy to forget the potential they hold.  According to the UNESCO study, mobile phones are the most promising pathway to combatting literacy precisely because so many people have them.  Over 6 billion of the world's  7 billion people have access to mobile phones.  (To put that in perspective, only about 4.5 billion have toilets).  21st century libraries are mobile.  


A San Francisco-based organization called  Worldreader delivers Kindles to under-equipped classrooms, and offers an app that lets users select from more than 6,000 e-books (most are free) on low-end feature phones.


From the article:

"A key conclusion from this study is that mobile devices can help people develop, sustain and enhance their literacy skills," lead author Mark West, of UNESCO, said in a statement. "This is important because literacy opens the door to life-changing opportunities and benefits."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Time to retire from online learning? - by Tony Bates

Time to retire from online learning? - by Tony Bates | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Bates shares frustration over the advent of MOOCs, particularly being driven by computer scientists rather than educators and psychologists.   He makes some interesting points and I don't blame him for being cranky.  Fielding has been successfully doing distributed learning since the late 1960s, but the Ivy Leagues are getting most of the glory for being so innovative as to take curriculum online.  


Nevertheless, the online courses that I've seen on Coursera and iVersity have been brilliantly designed with top notch content and instructors, often big names in the field.  They are not rigorous but they are informative (especially if you do the work).  They encourage community and conversation among participants, but not instructor feedback or  support that you would expect in a normal sized course on or offline.  Most of those, however, aren't free.  (Fielding caps their courses at 12, so as instructors, we invest a LOT of time with each student and with course development because, in spite of misguided stereotypes about online teaching, you lose some of the leverage that you have in person and the syllabus and course design have to be not just well-designed but tight.  There's no "winging" a lecture like you can do in person.)  But I get Bates' concerns and his point and think they're valid.  


The part Bates doesn't mention is that for many people around the world, MOOCs provide access to a world of knowledge that was previously not available.  To me, this is the value of MOOCs whether it's run by a computer scientist or not.  Like the Manobi Foundation that provides rural farmers with market prices so they are not held hostage by middle men, MOOCs can open doors to possibilities so that people's futures and aspirations aren't held hostage by isolation.  

more...
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 16, 11:14 AM

"I am concerned that the computer scientists seem to be taking over online education. Ivy League MOOCs are being driven mainly by computer scientists, not educators. Politicians are looking to computer science to automate learning in order to save money. Computer scientists have much to offer, but they need more humility and a greater willingness to work with other professionals, such as psychologists and teachers, who understand better how learning operates. This is a battle that has always existed in educational technology, but it’s one I fear the educators are losing. "

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Tracking Transmedia
Scoop.it!

WOW. Jane Goodall launches online MOOC course in digital mapping for communities (Wired UK)

WOW. Jane Goodall launches online MOOC course  in digital mapping for communities (Wired UK) | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
On the day of her eightieth birthday, renowned primatologist Jane Goodall launched a massive open online course (MOOC) based around digital mapping for communities

Via siobhan-o-flynn
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Jane Goodall is the poster child for generativity --  innovating approaches to conservation and education and, by the way, changing how we do 'aging'--redefinition, reeducation, and 'repurposing' (i.e. finding new ways to pursue purpose and meaning).  I want to be like her when I grow up.  On her 80th birthday, Goodall launched a MOOC in participatory mapping.  She believes shared knowledge and mapping skills are ways for people, especially young people, to discover where they can make a difference in their own communities.  Goodall praised Google, saying the company was "helping us [The Goodall Institute] so much with our technology and our tablets and getting the field staff to monitor their own forests -- it's changed the way we do conservation" 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Anthony Mcloughlin
Scoop.it!

Case Study: Removing Pricing Improves Beta Sign Ups by 31% | Tone Agency Blog

Case Study: Removing Pricing Improves Beta Sign Ups by 31% | Tone Agency Blog | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
In December 2013 we proudly invited people to join the beta list for our new web application, Unveil. Unveil allows web and graphic designers to present design concepts to clients and get real time feedback all in one place. Unveil significantly reduces the amount of back and forth email communication saving designers and clients valuable time. Objective …
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Removing pricing allows experimentation without risk.  Increases "advance" response of the brain, although our rational brain would tell us that what is too good to be true usually is.  Nevertheless, with new tools available all the time, trials without cost make sense to turn lookers into users.  How many times have you declined an opportunity to explore if cost was involved?  In my experience you can $2.99 and $9.99 yourself to pretty big numbers.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
Scoop.it!

The web series is dying – and Netflix and Amazon Prime are responsible

The web series is dying – and Netflix and Amazon Prime are responsible | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The emergence of Netflix & Amazon Prime over web series argues that the value proposition for consumers is on control first--the  'delivery on demand' rather than the raw, quirkiness of indy productions.  Now the face-off moves to content.  But can high budget productions keep up with demand for content?  Raises the bar for web series, certainly, and eliminates the novelty effect for early adopters, but good content is good content.  I see adaptation not demise.  

more...
The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, September 13, 2:32 PM


"James Rawson: The fledgling format, which seemed full of potential only a year ago, is in decline, because it cannot compete with the big guns of online television"

Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, September 14, 1:18 AM

As brand new shows found audiences online, established web series had already proved the viability of the medium as a career launchpad: Broad City, a New York-based comedy about best friends Ilana and Abbi, was picked up by Comedy Central; Children’s Hospital, a kind of nightmarish Scrubs, is now shown on Adult Swim; and Burning Love, a Ben Stiller spoof of The Bachelor, won an Emmy. They all began as online series, in the wild west web, where anything goes.

Click to read more.

Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Police use wealth of selfies to track missing young people

Police use wealth of selfies to track missing young people | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Increasingly, the faces on the posters of missing teens aren’t taken by a school photographer or a parent but by the teens themselves. The selfies, as they’re known, are sometimes just days or hours old.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

We should consider the motivating effect of selfies, which provide a more emotionally resonant image than traditional portraiture, and the probability of people responding to help.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

What Parents and Kids Should Know About Selfies - US News

What Parents and Kids Should Know About Selfies - US News | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
In a world obsessed with social media, the #selfie has become a teen's online identity.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Selfies are redefining not just portraiture but event documentation.  No more autographs or or empty vacation shots of a monument.  Selfies are authentic, immediate and personal.  We have always taken photographs to document, share and remember life's events.  Flip lens, smartphones enable a new fluidity and personalization.  You can choose if you share with a few or many.  And like any visual image--they deliver more 'information' than text because they include physical cues and context to the main message.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Thanks to Casey Kasem (and psychology), here’s why people love radio countdowns

Thanks to Casey Kasem (and psychology), here’s why people love radio countdowns | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
People crave lists and simplification of data -- Kasem tapped into that with his wildly popular AT40.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

OMG, the word  'psychology' made it into the headline.  I'm so happy!  Nothing like being an evangelist for an under-appreciated field #mediapsychology.   

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
Scoop.it!

‘Emma Approved’ Turns Its Plot Into A Real-Life Charity Drive [#Transmedia]

‘Emma Approved’ Turns Its Plot Into A Real-Life Charity Drive [#Transmedia] | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Harnessing the power of narrative and the passions of fans has tremendous potential for innovative approaches to CSR.

more...
The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, June 16, 11:06 PM


Sam Gutelle:  "Pemberley Digital has established itself as a leader in transmedia YouTube entertainment. [...] With its latest transmedia tie-tin, Pemberley is leveraging its uniquely dedicated fanbase for a good cause."

Simon Staffans's curator insight, June 17, 1:28 PM

An interesting turn of events.

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from #transmediascoop
Scoop.it!

Nuno Bernardo: Storytelling is a social experience

Nuno Bernardo: Storytelling is a social experience | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
beActive's CEO explains why "transmedia enriches stories by activating our human affinity for shared experiences"

Via Simon Staffans
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Stories are fundamental to social connection.  Our ability to 'mentalize' and imagine allows people to bridge social and cultural gaps because stories focus on our fundamental humanity.  Recently listened to Billie Goldman from Intel talk at #SoMe Awards Forum on Intel's innovative  "Inside Films" series.  They exemplify Bernardo's message on the importance of shared experience.  It may be brand extension and awareness, but psychologically, it is about empathy and connection--the most valuable (and hard to measure) forms of social capital.

more...
Simon Staffans's curator insight, May 28, 2:46 AM

Some good thoughts from Nuno.

Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Mills & Boon characters will email you back in new transmedia tale (Wired UK)

Mills & Boon characters will email you back in new transmedia tale (Wired UK) | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
After more than 100 years, the Mills & Boon franchise is crafting itself a digital future through a dedicated ereader app and now a desktop and social media storytelling platform, The Chatsfield
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Congrats to Robert Pratten for sharing a new project using Conducttr.  Mills & Boon's franchise is romantic escapism, allowing eager readers to achieve the sense of presence in another world (what psychologists call narrative transportation w/nod to Green & Brock).  Vacations from reality.  There is no more powerful way of experiencing that journey than a through a well-crafted transmedia narrative.  It gives you multiple, multi-sensory touchpoints to engage cognitively and emotionally with a story and its characters.  These romances, like epic journeys, are the perfect raw materials for talented media producers to articulate a larger storyworld through thoughtful (and extensive) planning and media creation.  At the end of the day, the world they create, is about human behavior #mediapsych, because it only comes to life in the mind and body of the audience.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Pervasive Entertainment Times
Scoop.it!

VR/AR What's better? Being in a virtual world or layering digital over real world? Comments - GameInformer

VR/AR What's better? Being in a virtual world or layering digital over real world? Comments - GameInformer | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Would you rather have a virtual world created around you? Or see the world around you change?

Via Gary Hayes
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The answer to this question if you're going to place bets is the answer to: which environment better facilitates fundamental human goals like social connection, identity and self-efficacy, virtual worlds or layering digital over the real world?  

more...
Gary Hayes's curator insight, March 31, 8:10 PM

Quote "

Virtual reality isn't widely available yet, but Oculus Rift test kits are in the hands of many, and interesting experiences are already being crafted.

Which technology has you more excited? Microsoft's IllumiRoom technology looks very cool, and doesn't require glasses, but it's hard to imagine that it will be more immersive than virtual reality hardware. Also, Microsoft may be working on a form of augmented reality gaming that requires headgear, anyway. I have my personal misgivings about virtual reality headsets, but you can't deny how quickly it pulls you into a virtual world.

Is there one technology you will be quicker to embrace over the other? Or are you happy with your interactive digital experiences the way they are?"

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from #transmediascoop
Scoop.it!

Thinking beyond screens

When Latitude released their ”Future of Storytelling II” research report last year, some things stood out as pretty exceptional to me. One of them was that of all the people they’d talked to – most...

Via Simon Staffans
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The psychological experience of story doesn't recognize artificial boundaries.  Simon Staffans' remarks underscore the fading distinction between 'online' and 'offline' in terms of how we experience life.  

more...
Simon Staffans's curator insight, April 26, 1:58 AM

Some thoughts on storytelling beyond screens, while yet geared toward a mass audience. A couple of examples included.

Jeni Mawter's comment, April 29, 2:13 AM
For those interested in the future of storytelling for Young Adults have a look at: http://www.slideshare.net/jenimawter/the-future-of-story-telling-transmedia-toe-dipping-2013
Jeni Mawter's curator insight, April 29, 2:15 AM

For those interested in the future of Storytelling for Young Adults you may want to have a look  at:

 

http://www.slideshare.net/jenimawter/the-future-of-story-telling-transmedia-toe-dipping-2013

Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

7 Social Media Trends Dominating 2014 | Mobile Marketing Watch

7 Social Media Trends Dominating 2014 | Mobile Marketing Watch | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Infographic from Media Mosaic highlighting seven social media trends shaping 2014.

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The takeaway from this infographic is that brands have to pay more attention to their customers.  It's sort of a sad commentary on brands in general if paying attention to what customers need and care about is big news.  The real message to brands is that with social technologies, there's no excuse if you don't.  Hope they're listening.  If they're not, their customers won't be.

more...
Esther van Rees's curator insight, May 3, 4:15 AM

Organisaties gaan actief luisteren naar consumenten. en klanten. Voornamelijk foto´s worden gezien als de betere marketingtool. Een beeld zegt immers meer dan duizend woord. En dat weet de steeds grotere groep vluchtende jongeren van Facebook naar Instagram maar al te goed. 

Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

A Visual Dictionary of Philosophy: Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics

A Visual Dictionary of Philosophy: Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
A charming exercise in metaphorical thinking and symbolic representation.

Rodin believed that his art was about removing the stone not pa
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The Power of Image: Whether these geometric representations of 'big ideas' in philosophy capture the meaning for you, this is a beautiful example of the power of image in a world where communications are becoming increasingly visual.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

11 Shocking New Social Media Statistics in America | Convince and Convert: Social Media Strategy and Content Marketing Strategy

11 Shocking New Social Media Statistics in America | Convince and Convert: Social Media Strategy and Content Marketing Strategy | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Social media statistics from The Social Habit by Edison Research includes several very interesting data points about Facebook, Twitter and beyond. Free download
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

"Shocking" statistics not so shocking when seen from a media psychology perspective: 1) Twitter users skew democratic: Younger people tend to be more liberal and younger people tend to be earlier adopters of technology. 2) The "Check-in" never happened because publicly broadcasting your location doesn't make support individual goals very often  (and it's a little creepy). 3) Most American's don't "follow" brands because people like people better.  Social media is about human connection, not communications tools.  Brands aren't people so value delivery has to be more tangible (or more human).  4, 5 and 6) Social networks are about human connection.  Everyone, regardless of age, is instinctively motivated to connect with others.  It improves our mental and physical health.  Social media is just one way of doing that.  People aren't "addicted" to Facebook.  They are "addicted" to people.  7, 8 and 9). Facebook = WOM.  It's isn't Facebook's influence.  It's how Facebook facilitates the perception of WOM if not WOM.  10) Twitter serves a different type of social function (less intimate) so assumptions of how it works are different.  Changes in Facebook can violate first order relationships.  11) Twitter has been around long enough for people to figure out what it's good for and how it meets individual goals.  The users that stick around actually use it.  Net?  Interesting, yes.  Shocking, no.

more...
No comment yet.