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Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies
Where technology & media meet human experience
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Wearable Technology Gets Emotional

Wearable Technology Gets Emotional | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
The next wave of wearables steers clear of fitness in favor of mental wellness.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Technology continues to empower the individual.  The "Quantifiable Self" technology is reaching beyond the physical to incorporate the psychological aspects of mood.  That connection has tremendous power for behavior change and self-growth.  You may have noticed that the self-help section of Barnes and Nobles is the largest in the store--and those are "just books".  When usability and price intersect with function, self-help wearable technology will explode. Fitbit is already synonymous with fitness tracker (lucky Fitbit) and wearables haven't even touched the potential in revealing the mind-body connection.

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Event Details

Event Details | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Brands have a story. Audiences have a story. Psychology is the link to make them fit and achieve optimal engagement across media platforms. Join us! Learn the psychology of branding with story, transmedia strategy and audience engagement through persona development. Dr. Jerri Lynn Hogg and I are presenting an overview of Fielding's new certificate program in Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement in a webinar July 1 at 4pm PT. Courses in the certificate include the two we designed 'Branding and Transmedia Storytelling' and 'Audience Profiling'. For more info mscadmission@fielding.edu or check out audiencepsych.com

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Chinese Social Media Marketing Explained, Through One Super-Viral Selfie

Chinese Social Media Marketing Explained, Through One Super-Viral Selfie | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
how chinese star fan bing bing's new romance was seized on by social media marketers.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Key success factor not mentioned in all the brand leveraging opportunities: selfies feel personal, especially when they make eye contact and have context.  Weibo, like Twitter and SnapChat, enhances the effect because it feels more authentic and immediate than other types of social media. 

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Social Media And The Evolution Of Marketing

Social Media And The Evolution Of Marketing | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Selling with proof, case studies and real customer testimonials is an age old technique. Has this changed with the advent of social media or morphed into something different?
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Smart marketing is about getting shares.  Had a nice email from Tim Knowles that he had linked the article here with my blog post about the 2012 Obama campaign's use of social media--much more personal (not to mention effective)way of reaching out than letting a ping do the connecting for you.  


Knowles' post also highlights a couple of important points which are easily forgotten in the plethora of social media tools and channels. First, it's not about the tools. You must find and really get to know your audience.  The second is clearing the airspace so your message can be heard.  This requires that you, in the tradition of the Ancient Greeks, also "know thyself"--or have developed your core brand story-- because the customer-brand connection are psychologically interdependent.  


Brands tell a lot of stories--and through the eyes of a narrative psychologist everything is fundamentally a story--but that is different from THE brand story, the core story that encapsulate the values and purpose of the brand.  THE brand story should be the north star that guides all other stories you tell.  


Getting your message heard is about the intersection of stories--the union of the audience's story with that of your brand. Most messaging is like a collision, like sheep butting heads.  Noisy, unpleasant, and winning takes a long time.  The intersection of stories is where meaning and experience are created in the mind of the consumer; where the relationship begins.  When the brand and consumer stories fit, they become inseparable, part of the consumer's identity.  Are you an Apple or  PC person?  A Coke or a Pepsi person?  These stories work not just because of good brand stories, but because the brand stories intersected with consumer stories and created a shared story with larger meaning.

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6 Technologies Shaping Higher Education

6 Technologies Shaping Higher Education | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

TThe NMC Horizon Report looks at the technologies that will shape the future of higher education over the next 1-5 years.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The examples highlighted in this article--flipped classrooms, wearables, 'Internet of things' equipped classrooms--spark the imagination with their potential.  I fear that the adoption rate will be, sadly, slower than the article projects given that we still have people debating the evils of social technologies and video games unable to lift their view high enough to see the learning concepts that frame the content.  The good news is that some of the stalwarts of technophobia, such as the American Association of Pediatricians who published some of the more unreasonably restrictive guidelines for childhood screen time, are reevaluating their positions, and school districts are starting to think about introducing the long-needed "CyberCivics" into their curriculum.  

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TV industry faces its ‘ketchup’ moment: ‘Mobile is now the first screen’

TV industry faces its ‘ketchup’ moment: ‘Mobile is now the first screen’ | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
France Télévisions’ director of future media Eric Scherer on the trends providing headaches and huge opportunities alike for television firms
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Woe to the industries that sit back and think TV is the only place where mobile is the first screen.  Scherer highlights the need for mobile, interactive and LIVE.  The implications are far greater than just retooling the website.

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The roles of transparency and trust in a real time, big data world are much more important.  Scherer's talking about TV's access to consumer data, but the ability to see and track ultimately cuts both ways.  We will see politicians crash and burn if they continue to assume that keeping your head down and nondisclosure are viable strategies for misdeeds and missteps.  Whatever the headaches of mobile and real time interactivity as disrupting technologies, I'm a huge fan of transparency and trust as meaningful social currency replacing 'who you know' and 'what you can get away with' in government and business.  Ironically, this giant free-for-all we call the Internet may be the driver for a renewed society-wide focus on ethics and values. #mediapsych Ketchup may come out of the bottle all at once, but it will only disguise a bad hamburger for so long

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How To Convince Your Boss You Need a Content Marketing Software

How To Convince Your Boss You Need a Content Marketing Software | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
You’re the most important element of your content marketing, not the software. Software is just a tool. Your company trusts you to make the decisions.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

If your organization's marketing team is in denial about the whole concept of content marketing, showing them demo of what good content marketing software actually does can be a real eye-opener.  Maybe it can be the thin edge of the wedge into a larger conversation about delivering value before the sale.  (Yes, I'm always the optimist!)

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The media is the message

The media is the message | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The media isn't the message (and Jeff Gomez never says that).  It is the grand disrupter, the gamechanger, the brain bender.  The innovations in media technologies have upended traditional storytelling across all industries and challenged storytellers to learn new tools.  Media technologies and network connectivity have also, as Gomez points out, rewired consumer's brain with a new set of assumptions and expectation about the function and role of media.  Where media becomes part of the message, is in how it frames content within that set of expectations and meanings.  Our expectations of content, impact and interactivity are vastly different across platforms, i.e. mobile versus the big screen or web versus TV or digital versus paper.  The new environment as Gomez notes, demands integration of expectations in the content design

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, April 13, 2:45 PM


Keith Barclay:  "Starlight Runner’s Jeff Gomez talked transmedia at the recent edition of FILMART in Hong Kong. After headlining the event’s T for Transmedia conference session, the world’s #1 exponent of successful transmedia campaigns sat down for a chat with SCREENZ about his work."

Jahmila Canale's curator insight, April 18, 7:38 AM

Una nueva manera de ver la comunicación. Encontrado en sugerencias. 

Jo Campbell's curator insight, April 19, 11:41 PM

The use of transmedia and platforms in teaching

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From Virtual Reality to Interactive Documentaries: 'Sensory Stories' Showcases Immersive Storytelling

From Virtual Reality to Interactive Documentaries: 'Sensory Stories' Showcases Immersive Storytelling | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

This exciting exhibit underscores the blending of boundaries between art and technology  (along with hints of potentials in storytelling to come).  When my daughter went to Parsons to get an MFA in exactly that--Design and Technology, I can see that at the time, as cool as I thought it was, I didn't understand the full magnitude of that kind of degree.  Do we handicap our kids by thinking about subjects to study in the ways we always have--in silos--rather than integrative?  We're concerned about encouraging the study of STEM skills particularly among girls but do we talk about them as part of the arts?  Or mention that there is no engineering without design?  (as in, engineer what?)  


Parents/Mentors/Anybody--if you're near this exhibition, take your or somebody else's kids (with permission, of course).  Talk to them about the stories the creators are trying to tell AND talk to them about how those cool things are a product of science, technology AND art, integrated into a powerful thing.  Tell them that every art lesson can be translated by technology and every science lesson can be expressed in some kind of art or design.  (You'll be introducing them to the unsung hero of every venture--art or science--user experience.)  Science, like art, exists as expressions of human creativity for the (presumed) betterment of humanity.  Every human experience is a story.  

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Debbie Elicksen 's curator insight, April 24, 4:24 PM

Exciting times to be a content creator.

Jeni Mawter's curator insight, May 4, 10:25 PM

Storytelling gets visceral. Exhibition allows audience to experience stories in a multi-sensual, personal and participatory way.

bladetriple786's curator insight, May 8, 11:18 AM

The Missing Element for my documentaries...

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“Getting Funded is Only Part of the Story”: Kickstarter Embraces Timeline Film Pages with Spotlight | Filmmaker Magazine

“Getting Funded is Only Part of the Story”: Kickstarter Embraces Timeline Film Pages with Spotlight | Filmmaker Magazine | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Kickstarter has rolled out today Spotlight, a very clever new design option for their project pages. On first glance it seems simple -- sort of like Facebook's
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Every Kickstarter project has a story at its core.  The Spotlight format accentuates both the narrative that created the project but allows the backers to enter into the journey along the way.  Done well, it can create a sense of immersion that increases engagement.

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15 Digital Storytelling Tools | Listly List

Engaging, multimedia-rich digital stories can capture the attention of students and increase their interest in exploring new ideas.
Combining storytelling with powerful digital creates a truly authentic learning experience that helps students develop a wide range of intellectual skills. | Animoto - Make & Share Beautiful Videos Online, How to use Bubblr, Capzles Classrooms Overview Video, Creaza Cartoonist Tutorial, GoAnimate for Schools Demo, ACMI - Generator, Make Beliefs Comix Tutorial, M
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Awesome tools list - also underscores the increasingly tough job it is for educators to stay current given the cost in time and $ of new platforms combined with what it takes to integrate technology tools into lessons, curricula and/or course construction.

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The Psychology of Twitter

The Psychology of Twitter | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
In an age where millions of people document their lives online, it begs the question: what are the psychological reasons behind Twitter? Read more about the psychology of social media here.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Belonging, love and affection all boil down to social connection--the primary driver of behavior hardwired into our primitive brains.  Part of the social connection dynamic is social validation, or that basic need to understand how we fit in the world and where our skills, talents and being are valued.  When others respond, it reinforces our sense of value and increases our sense of connectedness emotionally and physically by triggering our neuro-reward center.  Twitter's format of brevity and frequency mimics F2F conversation creates a sense of directness, lack of mediation and authenticity that enhances our feelings of connectedness.  


What tweets get shared?  The ones that are relationship building--recognition of others or value to others.

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21 Must-do Activities to Boost your Web TV Show or Movie Audience

Created by the folks at http://www.conducttr.com The document provides 21 practical ideas for how to extend your storyworld beyond the video channel to engage …
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Specific, practical and creative activities by @robpratten and the folks at @conducttr  to expand reach and touch.  Narrative experience is supported by actions, emotions and artifacts that lessen the experiential gaps and create a more immersive and continuous psychological experience.

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How Video Games Are Changing The Way We Grieve | Collectively

How Video Games Are Changing The Way We Grieve | Collectively | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Why in-game design is more important than ever.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Ryan and Amy Green's video game "That Dragon, Cancer" gives new meaning to the term serious games.  What transpired through the design and development, chronicling their journey with their young son's terminal cancer, shows the power of a narrative in game form to process tragedy and honor life by progressing through a story, experience emotional highs and lows and provide a safe environment--sort of an emotional halfway house--to get in touch with the frightening reality of losing a child.  I can't imagine the pain and admire the Green's willingness to share their journey in a way others can experience it. 

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Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Info Management
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Utah school creates 'texting lane' for phone-focused walkers

Utah school creates 'texting lane' for phone-focused walkers | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
One Utah university is giving students glued to their cellphones a place to call their own: a designated lane for texting while walking. The neon green lanes painted on the stairs to the gym at Utah Valley ...

Via Jerri Lynn Hogg
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Ironically, the act of creating the 'texting while walking' lane forces student to consider how they use technology while walking in order to pick the right lane. The choice forces students to stop and think about it. The result? Momentary tech mindfulness. Reverse psychology (aka good parenting).

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Jerri Lynn Hogg's curator insight, June 24, 6:11 AM

Sign of the times as we shift to adapt to the influence of technology.  The question remains how this shift influences our behavior.  Will the developed neural pathways provide us with the additional sensory information we need to not make this a really unsafe idea? 

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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How Transmedia Made LEGO the Most Powerful Brand in the World

How Transmedia Made LEGO the Most Powerful Brand in the World | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

LEGO did a great job of activating two profound assets in their transmedia efforts: 1) a product that was itself essentially about nontraditional storytelling and 2) a highly psychologically-invested customer base who had linked their own stories with LEGO over a lifespan of play.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, May 30, 4:08 AM


Rick DeMott:  "The tremendous success of LEGO’s storytelling and world-building can be seen in toys, games, TV, movies and even fan fiction."

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FilmRaise: How Social Innovation Impacts The Film Issue Space Media Psychology Review

FilmRaise: How Social Innovation Impacts The Film Issue Space Media Psychology Review | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Stephen White, MA Abstract: Through film and documentaries, change makers, media, non-profits, and for-profits in the film issue space, are all using metrics and data to evaluate their impact. They want to be able to say that their movie raised awareness, corrected an unjust law, or changed people’s behavior. They are developing scientific methods to ...
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

New paper by Stephen White available on the Media Psychology Review online academic journal.  The journal is published by the Media Psychology Research Center.  It was created to further cross-disciplinary and non-traditional examinations of the psychology of media and technology.  In this article, White explores the potential for integrating positive psychology into the evaluation of media impact.  


We welcome article submissions from practitioners as well as academicians. For more information, see http://mprcenter.org/review/submissions/


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The future of social relations

The future of social relations | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Overview of responsesBackgroundTechnology experts embrace the use of networked communications technologies and are naturally inclined to find them to be useful
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Everyone who has made a new friend, colleague or partner, met a new idea, found like-minded individuals, participated in a meaningful discussion, seen a picture of a long-distance relation, been inspired, or come across a new opportunity recognizes beyond a shadow of a doubt the potential for social expansion from peer-to-peer connectivity.  Does the Internet have a downside?  Sure. But as soon as we recognize the Internet as an extension of our social world and not some "other place," we will begin to focus more on 'cyber civics' and digital citizenship, and more effectively applying behavioral values and norms. People do seem, however, continually surprised that the full range of human behavior that exists offline should be manifest online.  Only to more people.  This is, in spite of our initial revulsion, a good thing as it raises our awareness to social problems that existing beyond our peripheral vision (or our particular set of blinders.)  Cyberbullying, for example, has significantly increased awareness of bullying offline as well as on.  Cell phone and elevator surveillance videos have changed our awareness of domestic violence from academic to visceral.


The landscape of the Internet helps us overcome some of the less productive social norms that offline behavior reenforces out of habit, negative stereotypes such as racial and gender bias.  Evidence suggests that individual identity growth that occurs in the anonymity of online environments translates into positive offline behaviors.  Can we continue to transfer the positive growth experiences on the Internet to break down previously entrenched social barriers offline?  I like to think so.  

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Minecraft and The Future of Transmedia Learning

Minecraft and The Future of Transmedia Learning | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

An excellent article that explores the link between Minecraft and the concept of transmedia education.  It underscores the importance of defining transmedia as a cross-media experience and critical 21st century literacy (and not immediately escalating to images of a Hollywood franchise).  It also contains links to a couple of very good 'transmedia education' resources if you haven't read them.

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Cindy Rudy's curator insight, April 24, 8:29 AM

A whole new term for me: transmedia learning!

Mónica Beloso's curator insight, April 24, 7:34 PM

añada su visión ...

Minna Kilpeläinen's curator insight, May 3, 4:05 PM
Barry Joseph: "Transmedia play “involves experimentation with and participation in a transmedia experience, but also applies to media that has no storyline, such as open-ended video games.” Open-ended games like Minecraft."
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Chevy Runs Digital Video Ads in Print (Yes, You Read That Right)

Chevy Runs Digital Video Ads in Print (Yes, You Read That Right) | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
The print ads include a video player, which allows readers to watch one of three short videos created by Chevy's creative agency.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Video in print gives new meaning to the term "reverse engineering."  While not new (CBS, for example, had in-print video in 2009), Chevy videos are less advertising and a bit more human--more about story rather than a sell, making the impact of video in static print all the more impactful.  As prices of this fall (implications in this article are that this is a 'big budget' endeavor), it will be fun to watch another boundary dissolve.  Harry Potter's moving newspapers aren't all that far away.  

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Where Entertainment Meets Marketing: Lessons from Kingsman, Rolex & James Bond

Where Entertainment Meets Marketing:  Lessons from Kingsman, Rolex & James Bond | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

By allowing brands to enter a storyworld, they become peers and friends.  When done thoughtfully and seamlessly (in other words, it adds to the story fabric and doesn't trigger the "oh look, product placement" inner voice in the viewer's head) it transforms what is essentially 'advertising' into WOM.  14% of people believe ads from the source; 77% believe WOM.  Very powerful shift.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, April 17, 3:56 PM


Simon Pont:  "Rather than brands as jarring interlopers within a story, we must explore how they can facilitate the creation of entertainment, and even enhance the content being made."

Marta Béjar's curator insight, April 21, 4:22 AM

The matter of advertisting

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2 MILLION Hillary Twitter followers are fake or people who never tweet

2 MILLION Hillary Twitter followers are fake or people who never tweet | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Two different online audit tools say no more than 44 per cent of Hillary's 3.6 million Twitter fans are real people who participate in the platform. She is also accused of cheating to build fake Facebook 'likes.'
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

There are two important points from a psychological perspective on buying and faking friends, followers and likes.  First, that this kind of thing demonstrates either some level of hubris or stupidity that the transparency and access of social networks wouldn't expose such actions.  You don't get the lift of exposure on the upside without the scrutiny.  A lot of grandma's rules of social behavior translate well to social networks, such as don't gossip in crowded elevators, or, in this case, make sure your underwear is clean. 


Second, research on social persuasion (notably Cialdini) shows that we assume something with more attention, friends, customers, etc. is better. We are hardwired to this cognitive bias, a hangover from our evolutionary behaviors such as knowing which berries are safe to eat. It is an unconscious response that guides our behavior.  When we find that we have been tricked and manipulated, it destroys trust.  Not just about the event in question, but about the character of the person we trusted.  It violates a social contract.  We can frame this in terms of other cognitive biases too, such as the  'just world' bias, in which we believe that things should be fair, which is why we like to see the bad guys get their come-uppance and the cheats get busted, and the reciprocity (or tit-for-tat) response in which we inherently keep track of social exchanges, favors and behaviors.  If you cheat me, it changes the nature of our relationship.  It destroys any 'obligations' from social exchanges.


While seeing lots of likes and friends on Facebook might make Hillary Clinton more appealing by offering 'social proof' of her as a candidate, the damage that would come from questions about character, trust, honesty, judgment, and fair play, not to mention any feelings of payback from being psychologically manipulated (i.e. unconsciously tricked) can seriously damage social capital between a candidate and supporters.


Hello?  None of this stuff is a secret.  With all the money spent on marketing and psychographics of big data, are there no media psychologists on board to look at the relational impact of social media?

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BattleKasting a Path to Literacy

BattleKasting a Path to Literacy | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
The literacy bridge between gaming and reading is an important one
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Brent Friedman @BFree63 is running a closed beta on the game in this article -  #BattleKasters --at #ECCC2015.  Find him for a demo. Seriously, who doesn't want to be able to cast spells?

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How Playing Multiplayer Video Games Help me Develop a Growth Mindset

How Playing Multiplayer Video Games Help me Develop a Growth Mindset | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Some video games can actually improve your intelligence. Read my story on how I developed a growth mindset through multiplayer video games.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

As Salmon Khan writes in the quote in this article, psychologist Carol Dweck has documented the difference in having a fixed versus growth mindset in how an individual approaches learning.  Vinay Patankar chronicles his use of video games to promote 'growth mindset' learning opportunities.  This parallels work by James Gee (e.g. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy) who writes about the way game structure creates affinity spaces where informal learning takes place across multiple dimensions that encourage not just cognitive flexibility, but reinforce resilience by lowering the consequences of risk, accurate and frequent feedback to a player's action that demonstrates agency, and opportunities to expand identity by assuming new identities and by internalizing achievement.  

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The good and bad of failing

The good and bad of failing | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Lately I’ve read a couple of articles on failing, which have echoed something I’ve felt for some time now. See, I’ve been preaching that failing is no disaster, that as long as we learn from our mi...

Via Simon Staffans
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Simon has an excellent point about needing to learn from failure rather than just fail, but it's also true that we don't know if we're going to succeed or fail from the outset of any effort.  Most entrepreneurs BELIEVE they will succeed, which is what gives them the gumption, for lack of a better non-sexist descriptor, to undertake their venture.  What we don't want, and I'm sure Simon would agree, is people trying to anticipate the ROF (Return on Failure) and not try for fear of not being able to adequately recoop their effort in intellectual capital.  This calculation introduces the possibility of failure.


The expression "Fake it 'til you make it" exists for a reason.  By taking an outward stance of confidence, we 'trick' our brain into upping our chances of success.  Mind-body connection and all that.  E.g., if we stand up straighter we feel more powerful.  "Faking it" helps keep our brain on track rather than letting those internal voices sabotage our belief in ourselves and potential for success.  If we are conscious of the need to learn from failure, it creates yet another reason, in the convoluted way our thinking works, to avoid trying challenges that have risk, as all good challenges do.  But to Simon's point, we should celebrate the learning not the failures.  At the same time, we need to remember to celebrate the effort, grit and resilience that keeps us getting back in the game no matter what we think we learned.  Just that action is, in fact, an ROF that has cumulative psychological benefits over a lifetime.

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Simon Staffans's curator insight, March 23, 4:30 PM

A post on how to fail, and how to not celebrate failing more than succeeding.