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Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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The best children's apps are about great storytelling and strong characters

The best children's apps are about great storytelling and strong characters | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Stuart Dredge: "Technology doesn't replace traditional skills, but it can bring kids into the creative process" ...


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies
Where technology & media meet human experience
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7 Social Media Trends Dominating 2014 | Mobile Marketing Watch

7 Social Media Trends Dominating 2014 | Mobile Marketing Watch | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Infographic from Media Mosaic highlighting seven social media trends shaping 2014.

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The takeaway from this infographic is that brands have to pay more attention to their customers.  It's sort of a sad commentary on brands in general if paying attention to what customers need and care about is big news.  The real message to brands is that with social technologies, there's no excuse if you don't.  Hope they're listening.  If they're not, their customers won't be.

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A Visual Dictionary of Philosophy: Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics

A Visual Dictionary of Philosophy: Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
A charming exercise in metaphorical thinking and symbolic representation.

Rodin believed that his art was about removing the stone not pa
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The Power of Image: Whether these geometric representations of 'big ideas' in philosophy capture the meaning for you, this is a beautiful example of the power of image in a world where communications are becoming increasingly visual.  

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11 Shocking New Social Media Statistics in America | Convince and Convert: Social Media Strategy and Content Marketing Strategy

11 Shocking New Social Media Statistics in America | Convince and Convert: Social Media Strategy and Content Marketing Strategy | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Social media statistics from The Social Habit by Edison Research includes several very interesting data points about Facebook, Twitter and beyond. Free download
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

"Shocking" statistics not so shocking when seen from a media psychology perspective: 1) Twitter users skew democratic: Younger people tend to be more liberal and younger people tend to be earlier adopters of technology. 2) The "Check-in" never happened because publicly broadcasting your location doesn't make support individual goals very often  (and it's a little creepy). 3) Most American's don't "follow" brands because people like people better.  Social media is about human connection, not communications tools.  Brands aren't people so value delivery has to be more tangible (or more human).  4, 5 and 6) Social networks are about human connection.  Everyone, regardless of age, is instinctively motivated to connect with others.  It improves our mental and physical health.  Social media is just one way of doing that.  People aren't "addicted" to Facebook.  They are "addicted" to people.  7, 8 and 9). Facebook = WOM.  It's isn't Facebook's influence.  It's how Facebook facilitates the perception of WOM if not WOM.  10) Twitter serves a different type of social function (less intimate) so assumptions of how it works are different.  Changes in Facebook can violate first order relationships.  11) Twitter has been around long enough for people to figure out what it's good for and how it meets individual goals.  The users that stick around actually use it.  Net?  Interesting, yes.  Shocking, no.

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Matthew Weiner On Formula-Free Storytelling And The "Mad Men" Writers' Room

Matthew Weiner On Formula-Free Storytelling And The "Mad Men" Writers' Room | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
The Mad Men creator tells how his childlike excitement for the city he calls home infuses the new season and talks about the secrets of the writers...
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Confirmation of the fundamental role of narrative in how the brain works and makes sense of reality: Robert Town has joined the Mad Men writers as a consultant.  Weiner says: "Every writer is looking for the beats, the way the story should be told, and to have someone come in who is so successful, who has no rules and is completely organic in their storytelling. It’s a confirmation of the process which is just trust your subconscious."

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Already mature? USC Professor Running A Course On Google Glass for Journalism

Already mature? USC Professor Running A Course On Google Glass for Journalism | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
It's the most mature wearable platform that's out there, says USC journalism professor Robert Hernandez. And we need to be proactive and figure it out.

Via Gary Hayes
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

I love that this USC course on Google Glass is about questions not answers.  Whether or not we'll all be wearing Google glasses isn't the point.  Wearable technology will increasingly give us the ability to layer information over 'reality.'  How and where we do it will be the result of the technology supporting human goals where reality can't deliver, just like all the best innovations do, from electric lights to Facebook. To me, the interesting questions are not what the technology can do, but what do people want to do and what fills the gap?

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Gary Hayes's curator insight, April 3, 2:46 PM

Quote "This fall, Hernandez will facilitate a class at USC's Annenberg School For Communication & Journalism that will focus on developing Glass-centric software for journalists. It won't be a traditional lecture, per se. Rather, the curriculum's goal is to build a collaborative environment where developers, Glass Explorers, and journalists can attempt to answer questions, like: How will omniscient technology like Glass disrupt what we conventionally consider journalism? What will an article created on the floating monocle's hardware look like? What are its limitations? And what kinds of unique narrative experiences can we create, truly? At the end of the course, if all goes as planned, those applications will be built and, ideally, used."

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Lego Crowdsources Its Way to New Toys

Lego Crowdsources Its Way to New Toys | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Its Lego Cuusoo site lets fans share—and possibly profit from—their own toy designs
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

I talk about the shifting psychology in individuals and groups  due to social technologies all the time, but here is evidence of one company who gets it that made me smile - Lego crowdsourcing designs.  Who doesn't love Legos? From Mads Nipper, chief marketing office at Lego: “Both children and adults these days are used to being, and expect to be, more involved.”  

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, April 7, 1:10 AM


Katarina Gustafsson "Brent Waller spent his childhood crafting plastic brick versions of characters from television shows and movies such as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Batman. Now 35, the Australian Lego fan has gotten so good at playing with the toys that the company soon will start selling one of his designs."

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Memories Are "Geotagged" In Your Brain

Memories Are "Geotagged" In Your Brain | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Scientists used a video game to understand how our brains map our memories of events, and associate them with other events that took place in the same area.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Evidence suggests that the human brain geomaps virtual space, giving a new look at how memory devices, such as the "mind palace" (as per BBC's Sherlock but which links back to ancient Greek orators, like Cicero) might work.  Love the thought of hippocampus as cartographer.

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Evolution of Storytelling

Evolution of Storytelling | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose), Mervi Rauhala, Hans Heesterbeek, The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Great infographic on storytelling! Every stage of technology amplifies the  input to the brain, increasing our multi-sensory experience.  The chart says ARGs blur the line between fantasy and reality, but our ability to project emotions and presence (i.e. narrative transportation) have allowed us to blur that line from the beginning in a well-told story.       

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Claude Emond's curator insight, April 5, 5:11 AM

Good story told on this infographic. For those leaders who know that nothing beats telling a good story :)

Marta Torán's curator insight, April 6, 2:56 AM

Genial!

Clare Treloar's curator insight, April 10, 3:04 PM

Another interesting infographic

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How Samsung Tricked Obama Into Shooting That Selfie With David Ortiz

How Samsung Tricked Obama Into Shooting That Selfie With David Ortiz | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Duping the president of the United States into a social media campaign is shady advertising work from David Ortiz and Samsung
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Why Samsung needs a media psychologist: Samsung, a company who is pretty smart about marketing, was remarkably dumb about the psychology that drives successful social media strategies.  They should read the #psych and #neuromarketing chapters about authenticity and how people resent being tricked and manipulated.  Manipulation is one of those primal things that triggers our survival mechanism and makes us wary, whether we are aware of it or not.  Think halo effect.  Trust is hard to build and easy to lose.  (Too bad about all the contrivance, too, because my guess is that David Ortiz is happy to have the once-in-a-lifetime #selfie with Obama.)

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Does teaching presence matter in a MOOC? - by Terry Anderson


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Anderson has a provocative post discussing a recent study by Tomkin and Charlevoix (2014) reporting that MOOC course satisfaction, completion or decision to enroll in another MOOC had no relationship with teacher interaction or presence in the MOOC.  This kind of thing always gets teachers' panties in a bunch, as we know.  Anderson argues that these results are predicted by his "Interaction Equivalency Theory where one of the three forms of student interaction (student-student, student-teacher, student content) is at a high level, the other two can be reduced or even eliminated. "  As an online prof, I would argue that to get the equivalency over to the student-student or student-content side of the triangle, the course and content have to be very artfully and intentionally designed by the teacher with a great investment of time and skill.  So there's presence of interaction and there's presence by design.  It's presence by design to structure social and content engagement that allows the more traditional 'teacher presence' to be missing.  The exciting thing is that is has much leverage.  As a side note, people shouldn't assume that these arguments are meant to throw teachers out of the classroom and make all classes instructorless.  Humans are social animals and good teachers provide mentoring and social connection in ways far beyond course content that are difficult in the scale of a MOOC.   These are important questions, however, as part of the quest to find ways of making quality education available to the millions who don't have the access to educational opportunities most of us take for granted.


Tomkin, J. H., & Charlevoix, D. (2014). Do professors matter?: using an a/b test to evaluate the impact of instructor involvement on MOOC student outcomes. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the first ACM conference on Learning@ scale conference. Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2566245

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 14, 12:02 AM

"A recent study of a Coursera MOOC is really interesting in that it implemented a random assignment of student to 2 conditions – one with no teacher interaction with the students and the other with teacher and teacher assistant interaction in forums. The study is

Tomkin, J. H., & Charlevoix, D. (2014). Do professors matter?: using an a/b test to evaluate the impact of instructor involvement on MOOC student outcomes. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the first ACM conference on Learning@ scale conference. Retrieved fromhttp://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2566245

The study concluded that teacher presence had no significant relation to course completion, most badges awarded, intent to register in subsequent MOOCs or course satisfaction.  This is of course bad news for teacher’s unions and those convinced that a live teacher must be present in order for significant learning to occur. However, the findings is predicted by myInteraction Equivalency Theory in which I argue that if one of the three forms of student interaction (student-student, student-teacher, student content) is at a high level, the other two can be reduced or even eliminated.  Adding additional forms of interaction may increase satisfaction (though it seems not to have done so in this experiment), but it most certainly also increases costs and thus decreases accessibility."

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 14, 12:23 AM
Does teaching presence matter in a MOOC? - by Terry Anderson
Ulrike Grabe's curator insight, March 14, 1:51 AM

"The study concluded that teacher presence had no significant relation to course completion, most badges awarded, intent to register in subsequent MOOCs or course satisfaction."

 

"However, the findings is predicted by my Interaction Equivalency Theory in which I argue that if one of the three forms of student interaction (student-student, student-teacher, student content) is at a high level, the other two can be reduced or even eliminated."

 

That it is possible to learn on one's own is not exactly a surprise. Otherwise there would be no autodidacts, nobody would ever have been able to learn from a book. Surprising, though, that the presence of a teacher seems to have no impact on the learning outcome. On the other hand... students taking part in MOOCs usually have an academic background already. So they developed learning strategies and are able to compensate the absence of a teacher by interacting with other students or looking for other sources.

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Nuno Bernardo: "The age of multiplatform media is defined by audience behaviours"

Nuno Bernardo: "The age of multiplatform media is defined by audience behaviours" | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The logical extension of this is as audiences change, it is critical to set aside your assumptions about who they are and what they want and go find out.  This is why customer/audience persona development from a psychological perspective is so important.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, March 18, 10:44 AM


Nuno Bernardo:  "As the habits of audiences continue to evolve from traditional to digital platforms like the internet, tablets and smartphones, content producers also need to commit their resources to understanding these platforms and the ways in which audiences can engage with content through them."

danielle's curator insight, March 26, 2:45 AM

the importance of UCD!

António Maneira's curator insight, April 10, 10:32 AM

Great transmedia projects!

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How augmented reality builds bridge between games and children's books

How augmented reality builds bridge between games and children's books | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Two years ago, Sony's PlayStation 3 "game" Wonderbook began a trend that redefines both games and books for the 21st century
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

We spend so much time thinking about technology, especially augmented reality, with our serious hats on.  We forget that technology can create new playgrounds.  Play is the best way to learn things, especially things about ourselves.

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Use the “Vanishing Spell” in PowerPoint

Use the “Vanishing Spell” in PowerPoint | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

...Speaking of the spell, do you remember the scene when Harry wished he knew a good Vanishing Spell to escape his fan Colin’s photograph-clicking spree? Or the time when Bill Weasley used this incantation to make a stack of scrolls disappear while cleaning up after a meeting of the Order of the Phoenix during Harry's first night at number twelve, Grimmauld Place?


Via Baiba Svenca
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

A cautionary note on special effects in PowerPoint: special effects, including music and videos, in a PowerPoint presentation can add energy BUT if not used well, they can be distracting, or worse, appear unprofessional and immature.  When my daughters first started using PPT in middle school, their reports were full of figures dashing in with screeching sounds and words appearing with flashing lights and drum rolls.  I have seen far too many 'grown-ups' add those and a myriad of other special effects as if they were the cure to death by PPT.  (They aren't.)  You may have heard the term 'font abuse' that comes from having so many choices and results in a sense of exploration and new found font freedom that drives restraint out the window.  Don't fall prey to 'special effect abuse' in your enthusiasm.  Some good rules to follow: 1) Draft your ENTIRE presentation before you even put it in PPT. 2) Use special effects ONLY when they reinforce your message, make your idea more understandable or facilitate the flow of the presentation. Remember that a presentation is for your audience, not to entertain yourself or demonstrate your special effects prowess.


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Judih Weinstein Haggai's curator insight, March 12, 8:49 PM

a cool trick. easy to use.

Lee Hall's curator insight, March 13, 1:05 PM

Great attention grabber for your presentation.

Lon Naylor's curator insight, March 24, 3:53 PM

Interesting animation using one of the "legacy" effects we tend to forget about...

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Time to retire from online learning? - by Tony Bates

Time to retire from online learning? - by Tony Bates | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Bates shares frustration over the advent of MOOCs, particularly being driven by computer scientists rather than educators and psychologists.   He makes some interesting points and I don't blame him for being cranky.  Fielding has been successfully doing distributed learning since the late 1960s, but the Ivy Leagues are getting most of the glory for being so innovative as to take curriculum online.  


Nevertheless, the online courses that I've seen on Coursera and iVersity have been brilliantly designed with top notch content and instructors, often big names in the field.  They are not rigorous but they are informative (especially if you do the work).  They encourage community and conversation among participants, but not instructor feedback or  support that you would expect in a normal sized course on or offline.  Most of those, however, aren't free.  (Fielding caps their courses at 12, so as instructors, we invest a LOT of time with each student and with course development because, in spite of misguided stereotypes about online teaching, you lose some of the leverage that you have in person and the syllabus and course design have to be not just well-designed but tight.  There's no "winging" a lecture like you can do in person.)  But I get Bates' concerns and his point and think they're valid.  


The part Bates doesn't mention is that for many people around the world, MOOCs provide access to a world of knowledge that was previously not available.  To me, this is the value of MOOCs whether it's run by a computer scientist or not.  Like the Manobi Foundation that provides rural farmers with market prices so they are not held hostage by middle men, MOOCs can open doors to possibilities so that people's futures and aspirations aren't held hostage by isolation.  

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 16, 11:14 AM

"I am concerned that the computer scientists seem to be taking over online education. Ivy League MOOCs are being driven mainly by computer scientists, not educators. Politicians are looking to computer science to automate learning in order to save money. Computer scientists have much to offer, but they need more humility and a greater willingness to work with other professionals, such as psychologists and teachers, who understand better how learning operates. This is a battle that has always existed in educational technology, but it’s one I fear the educators are losing. "

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WOW. Jane Goodall launches online MOOC course in digital mapping for communities (Wired UK)

WOW. Jane Goodall launches online MOOC course  in digital mapping for communities (Wired UK) | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
On the day of her eightieth birthday, renowned primatologist Jane Goodall launched a massive open online course (MOOC) based around digital mapping for communities

Via siobhan-o-flynn
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Jane Goodall is the poster child for generativity --  innovating approaches to conservation and education and, by the way, changing how we do 'aging'--redefinition, reeducation, and 'repurposing' (i.e. finding new ways to pursue purpose and meaning).  I want to be like her when I grow up.  On her 80th birthday, Goodall launched a MOOC in participatory mapping.  She believes shared knowledge and mapping skills are ways for people, especially young people, to discover where they can make a difference in their own communities.  Goodall praised Google, saying the company was "helping us [The Goodall Institute] so much with our technology and our tablets and getting the field staff to monitor their own forests -- it's changed the way we do conservation" 

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Case Study: Removing Pricing Improves Beta Sign Ups by 31% | Tone Agency Blog

Case Study: Removing Pricing Improves Beta Sign Ups by 31% | Tone Agency Blog | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
In December 2013 we proudly invited people to join the beta list for our new web application, Unveil. Unveil allows web and graphic designers to present design concepts to clients and get real time feedback all in one place. Unveil significantly reduces the amount of back and forth email communication saving designers and clients valuable time. Objective …
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Removing pricing allows experimentation without risk.  Increases "advance" response of the brain, although our rational brain would tell us that what is too good to be true usually is.  Nevertheless, with new tools available all the time, trials without cost make sense to turn lookers into users.  How many times have you declined an opportunity to explore if cost was involved?  In my experience you can $2.99 and $9.99 yourself to pretty big numbers.

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Marvel's iPhone App Turns Sketches Into Tappable Mobile App "Prototypes" - TechCrunch

Marvel's iPhone App Turns Sketches Into Tappable Mobile App "Prototypes" - TechCrunch | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Marvel's iPhone App Turns Sketches Into Tappable Mobile App "Prototypes" TechCrunch Marvel, a UK startup founded last year by ex-employees of Enpocket (acquired by Nokia), is on a mission: to put creating a mobile app “prototype” within the reach...
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Love to see apps that lower the entry hurdle on design and development. 

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Rise of the mobile-first social network: US stats

Rise of the mobile-first social network: US stats | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

The majority of social media sites are seeing far more traffic and time spent coming from mobile devices than from desktops.


Via siobhan-o-flynn
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

You've probably noticed, but mobile devices have smaller screens than desktops and laptops (at least currently).  This means that producers have to consider a host of design issues.  "Mobile friendly" isn't enough.  Content has to be created to be brain-friendly to ensure usability and engagement.   Usability and engagement are not the same thing.  

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UA Humanities Professors Take Digital Approach to Teaching the Past | UANews

UA Humanities Professors Take Digital Approach to Teaching the Past | UANews | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

UA Students developed #AR content build on Layar app to augment real world sites in collaboration with Parisian tour company by making content for "When African Americans Came to Paris" course:

"One of the students going this year is just enchanted by Josephine Baker, and she actually looks like her a bit," [Professor] Carter said. "We're going to dress her up as Josephine and film her in front of a green screen. That way, when you scan the doorway of the theater where Josephine played her last performance, we'll incorporate geo-tagging and you'll see the student coming out of that doorway as Josephine."

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8 Tips for an Awesome Prezi


Via Baiba Svenca, Cynthia Garrety
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Prezi can be very effective but they are fundamentally based on creating perceptions of movement.  Estimates in WSJ that 25%-40% of population has motion sensitivity depending on the mode of transportation.  That may be simplistic but as a media psych prof, I have seen more than my share of over-exuberant Prezis whipping in and out and around such that I could barely make it through.  (Yes, I'm one of those 25%-40%ers)  So a word of caution to presenters.  If presentations are about your audience, keep in mind that restraint applies to more than the number of words per slide.  There are lots of ways to lose an audience.  None are good.  This is one of the worst.

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Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 17, 8:32 AM

Some  great ideas for students interested in getting away from the conventional PowerPoint! 

Jeff Dumoulin's curator insight, April 18, 6:44 AM

Great Prezi on making great Prezis 

Dave Wood's curator insight, April 18, 12:41 PM

Some really useful tips about structuring information and the impactful use of visuals.  I haven't been a huge fan of Prezi because they can be just too "busy" and disorientating when they incorporate too much spin as they move from image to image. These tips give good advice about how to keep it simple for best effect.

I've used Prezi as a way of presenting the notes from a visual group coaching session back to the participants.

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How an Interdisciplinary Transmedia Project Can Address Mental Illness Stigma

How an Interdisciplinary Transmedia Project Can Address Mental Illness Stigma | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Eager to learn more about 'For the Records' and it's dynamics--interactivity, audience participation, multiple threads--and where the gaming elements intersect with the other elements.  All the things that create a rich sense of narrative transportation and multi-sensory experience may go a long way to shift perceptions through empathy.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, April 2, 8:57 PM


Mona Shattell:  "How does one go about an interdisciplinary project spanning art and science? How might this look? we set out to explore how mental health advocacy, video game design, and documentary filmmaking could come together to enhance understanding and fight stigma about mental illness."

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Jay Bushman: 3 keys to making a successful web series

Jay Bushman: 3 keys to making a successful web series | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Bushman's 3 keys is a great article because there is compelling psychology underlying all of them.  My favorite of Bushman's three keys are 2 and 3.  Key 2 is setting and keeping expectations.  However innovative your project, he speaks to the importance of creating rhythms and patterns so the audience can develop expectations.  From a neuro-cognitive perspective, the brain seeks patterns and derives pleasure and comfort from finding a structure and therefore can anticipate with pleasure new developments rather than feel frustrated.  In Key 3, Bushman says trust your team.  We often see articles about how you can't control your audience, but few about the same for the internal team.  Controlling people takes a lot of effort and at the end, nobody's happy.  Key 3 indicates how well Bushman has inspired his people and established team purpose and affiliation so that they can further the project with autonomy, increasing, no doubt, their own emotional investment it the characters and the project's success.  I would argue that right after having a good story comes having a good leader to achieve success.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, March 24, 6:43 PM


"Essential tips from the transmedia producer [Jay Bushman] of online video phenomenon The Lizzie Bennet Diaries!"

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Half an Hour: Like Reading a Newspaper - by Stephen Downes (on MOOC Completion)

Half an Hour: Like Reading a Newspaper - by Stephen Downes (on MOOC Completion) | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Downes highlights a society-wide heuristic about courses--that they are like books and argues that MOOCs aren't all like that.   In some cases they are, of course; some materials in courses and books build upon what came before.  This is true in subjects like math and in mystery novels.  I sign-up for MOOCs for entirely different reasons.  Sometimes it's to see the structure of a topic I know pretty well, sometimes it's to get a reading list, sometimes it's to cherry pick a lecture or two out of something I am interested in.  I have been known to read nonfiction books the same way, especially where multiple authors contribute chapters.  The biggest drawback to MOOCs for me is when the instructors don't include transcripts of their lectures.  As an online instructor, I can appreciate that a tremendous amount of work that goes into creating a syllabus for online environments--more than you would ever believe!  Most MOOCS instructors not only lay out the topics, but in order to construct  courses that are accessible to all background and language levels, they break them down into 8 minute soundbites and record clean little videos, but frankly, I don't have that much time.  I have a mountainous 'to-do' pile (by my own choice and/or inability to say no) so my learning time is precious.  I leave websites that don't load in a couple of seconds, so I'm not going to wade through 10 little lectures when I could skim a PDF script for the whole lot of them in less than it would take me to listen to one. 


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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 22, 9:14 AM

"The traditional course is designed like a book - it is intended to run in a sequence, the latter bits build on the first bits, and if you start a book and abandon it p[art way through there is a real sense in which you can say the book has failed, because the whole point of a book is to read it from beginning to end.

But our MOOCs are not designed like that. Though they have a beginning and an end and a range of topics in between, they're not designed to be consumed in a linear fashio the way a book it. Rather, they're much more like a magazine or a newspaper (or an atlas or a city map or a phone book). The idea is that there's probably more content than you want, and that you're supposed to pick and choose from the items, selecting those that are useful and relevant to your present purpose"

A/Prof Jon Willis's curator insight, March 22, 2:16 PM

This is an interesting take on course (and MOOC) design

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Tracking Transmedia
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Can Twitter Help Publishers Reinvent Books?

Can Twitter Help Publishers Reinvent Books? | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Twitter's 140 characters may seem limiting for authors, but the platform is using rich media, images, and experimental prose to remake storytelling.

Via siobhan-o-flynn
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Great exercise for the classroom to build multi-character interactions engaging lots of students, simultaneously giving those of us not born to the cloth practice at wrapping our heads around new ways of approaching storytelling.  Seems simple until you try it.

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siobhan-o-flynn's curator insight, March 15, 6:39 AM

very interesting:


"..Another winner from last year was Ranjit Bhatnagar. The New York-based artist wasn’t an official selection, but his Pentametronaccount became a surprise hit of the festival. Bhatnagar, who’s spent the last 20 years building experimental language projects, created an algorithm trolling for tweets in iambic pentameter, and then retweeting them.

“Twitter is all language,” says Bhatnagar, who runs several accounts merging math and literature. Pentametron’s real-time sonnets got him the attention of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, whose Twitter feed he took over and ran for a time...."

Lauren Scime's curator insight, March 16, 4:05 PM

Not a new concept but a good insight into how to best leverage Twitter for cross-platform storytelling

Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
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When thigh gaps attack: Target's Photoshop fail goes viral - TODAY.com

When thigh gaps attack: Target's Photoshop fail goes viral - TODAY.com | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it
Attack of the thigh gap! Yesterday, an observant blogger called out some pretty egregious Photoshop shenanigans on Target’s website; we...
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Even if the overzealous Photoshopping in this particular image was an error, it shows that Photoshopping was very likely being used in all these images, reducing and smoothing the thigh lines.  The irony is that these are young women who are already on the long tail of the bell curve in good looks or they wouldn't be swimsuit models.. and the art director is 'fixing' them.  I get that Target (and any merchandiser) wants to show their clothes on attractive, fit people.  We all aspire to be attractive and fit.  But this exposes an SOP that needs to be addressed.  A couple of somebodies here weren't doing their job somewhere in Target.  One somebody should have caught what is clearly an error and another somebody should be addressing a more socially responsible way of presenting the human body.  If they're tidying up women, you can bet they're tidying up men, too.  The directive to 'get real' needs to come from the top.  It's time to respect the customer, inspire them, yes, but not make them aspire to the unachievable where  they cannot help but fail. 


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