Psychology of Media & Technology
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Psychology of Media & Technology
The science behind media behaviors
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Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
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Baby News For YouTube Couple Accused of Faking Miscarriage

Baby News For YouTube Couple Accused of Faking Miscarriage | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Just two months ago, YouTube vloggers Sam and Nia, a married couple in Terrell, Texas, went viral when Sam surprised Nia with her own pregnancy by secretly testing the urine she’d left in their toilet. Sam captured the stunt in a YouTube video that garnered more than 15 million views. Then, three days
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

"Fake it 'til you make it" may be a good strategy for getting over anxiety before a meeting, but it's NOT a good strategy when you're selling authenticity on YouTube.  The Internet is powerful--it can propel an unknown with thousands of viewers, but with celebrity comes scrutiny. Those same eyes will be looking through a magnifying lens.  Social media relationships operate with the same rules as offline ones.  They are social contracts that thrive on honesty and are destroyed by deceit. 

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Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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BBC Radio 1's "Head Of Visualization" On How To Get To A Million YouTube Followers

BBC Radio 1's "Head Of Visualization" On How To Get To A Million YouTube Followers | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Our brain is the original flight simulator.  Nothing is as powerful as the human brains' ability to visualize and imagine and fill in the storyworld of what we hear.  Years of storytellers have taken us on all kinds of journeys, from Lake Wobegon to War of the Worlds.  Very smart to hear that BBC Radio thinks of listeners as 'viewers.'

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, January 28, 2014 4:20 AM


David Zax:  '“You’d be hard-pressed to find a young person who asks for an analog radio for Christmas,” admits Joe Harland, with wry British understatement. Harland works for BBC Radio 1 as its “head of visualization." If that sounds like something of an oxymoron for a radio station, well, that’s sort of the point' ...