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Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies
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Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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AR for Beginners - Augmented Reality in 8 GIFs

AR for Beginners - Augmented Reality in 8 GIFs | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The AR narrative - show, don't tell.  AR is almost impossible to tell someone about if they haven't seen it.  The technology is getting better but AR is only just touching it's potential to create user value beyond the 'new and thrilling' factor.  Helpful to see the range of applications and think about how AR can significantly impact/disrupt current behavior and support human goals while minimizing the physical burden of tech devices.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, February 9, 1:34 PM


Evan Freethy:  "From previewing virtual furniture in your home to mapping 3D environments, Augmented Reality applications are best explained with pictures, not words."

assass's curator insight, February 26, 6:36 PM

The implementation of the Augmented Reality tecnology in the architecture field present the possibility of changing for the best the way architects interact with their clients, allowing them to understand in a more compreenhensive way the building and the funiture they are paying for. This tecnology will also allow the client to take their house with them and present it to any friend or family, creating a feeling of affection for the build even before it is built.

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
Scoop.it!

Can Binge-Viewing TV Actually Be Good for Kids? Amazon Has a Plan

Can Binge-Viewing TV Actually Be Good for Kids? Amazon Has a Plan | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Journalists and society-at-large do #Amazon and viewers a huge disservice by tagging kid-centric content as '#binge-viewing' as if putting the viewer in control of what he/she watches is a bad thing--not to mention that it has nothing to do with what Amazon is trying to accomplish with their programming for preschoolers.  


Creators working with Amazon have intentionally tried to step out of their adult bias and look through eyes of preschoolers.  Their goal is to create engaging content that triggers curiosity and creativity.   This is the same approach I advocate for storytelling and central to the persona development and audience profiling in the courses & workshops we teach via Fielding's Masters program.  The fact that Amazon streaming allows for viewer controlled consumption encourages other activities because there is no #FOMO by playing through scheduled broadcasts.  Seriously, how is this even remotely negative?  When will we get over blaming the audience for exercising choice in content consumption?  I get how this is disruptive to current business models and how media companies might not be thrilled at having to be more creative to earn attention and loyalty, but consumers should be celebrating not labeling and journalists should get on board.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, May 26, 2014 4:00 AM


Ben Travers:  "With the studio's first ever original kids' shows debuting this summer, Amazon is trying to break into children’s programming from a groundbreaking new angle: long-term education."

Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, May 27, 2014 4:08 AM

 Tara Sorensen, Head of Kids Programming at Amazon Studios:

:

"We're not asking them to sit in front of the television and tie them to a block of programming [like with standard broadcast television]. They can pause it.

They can rewatch it. It offers up a nice amount of flexibility, so I don't think it's just about keeping them in front of a 'screen' for us."

Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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The web series is dying – and Netflix and Amazon Prime are responsible

The web series is dying – and Netflix and Amazon Prime are responsible | Psychology of Media & Emerging Technologies | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The emergence of Netflix & Amazon Prime over web series argues that the value proposition for consumers is on control first--the  'delivery on demand' rather than the raw, quirkiness of indy productions.  Now the face-off moves to content.  But can high budget productions keep up with demand for content?  Raises the bar for web series, certainly, and eliminates the novelty effect for early adopters, but good content is good content.  I see adaptation not demise.  

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, September 13, 2014 5:32 PM


"James Rawson: The fledgling format, which seemed full of potential only a year ago, is in decline, because it cannot compete with the big guns of online television"

Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, September 14, 2014 4:18 AM

As brand new shows found audiences online, established web series had already proved the viability of the medium as a career launchpad: Broad City, a New York-based comedy about best friends Ilana and Abbi, was picked up by Comedy Central; Children’s Hospital, a kind of nightmarish Scrubs, is now shown on Adult Swim; and Burning Love, a Ben Stiller spoof of The Bachelor, won an Emmy. They all began as online series, in the wild west web, where anything goes.

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