Psychology of Gaming
88 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nicola Johnson
Scoop.it!

Effect of Video Games on Child Development - Vanderbilt University

Effect of Video Games on Child Development - Vanderbilt University | Psychology of Gaming | Scoop.it
Danielle Dai and Amanda Fry. Little bit o' history. If you are a parent in this era of information and technology, chances are you have a child who has played, is playing, or will be playing video games.
more...
Liam Woodford's curator insight, May 4, 2014 12:50 PM

Carnagey et al. supports desensitisation to violence suggested in the picture in the article. Its not mentioned in the actual writing though.

Scooped by Nicola Johnson
Scoop.it!

Video Games and Psychology: Fact, Fiction, and Mystery 1/2

In which I discuss what Psychology has to say about the effects of playing video games. I use funny hand gestures too. This talk was given at the Dutch Starc...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicola Johnson
Scoop.it!

Feelings of Failure, Not Violent Content, Foster Aggression in Gamers

Feelings of Failure, Not Violent Content, Foster Aggression in Gamers | Psychology of Gaming | Scoop.it
But a new study shows hostile behavior is linked to gamers' experiences of failure and frustration during play—not to a game's violent content. The study is the first to look at the player's psychological experience with video ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicola Johnson from SocialPsy.
Scoop.it!

Leiden Psychology Blog - Articles - Gaming: bad or good for your memory?

Leiden Psychology Blog - Articles - Gaming: bad or good for your memory? | Psychology of Gaming | Scoop.it
The positive effects of gaming - @UniLeiden & @LorenzaColzato at Leiden Psychology Blog (via @Pocket) http://t.co/E96T55m1De

Via Giovanni Benavides
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicola Johnson from Geek Therapy
Scoop.it!

How video gaming can be beneficial for the brain

How video gaming can be beneficial for the brain | Psychology of Gaming | Scoop.it

Video gaming causes increases in the brain regions responsible for spatial orientation, memory formation and strategic planning as well as fine motor skills. This has been shown in a new study conducted at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Charité University Medicine St. Hedwig-Krankenhaus. The positive effects of video gaming may also prove relevant in therapeutic interventions targeting psychiatric disorders.


Via Josué Cardona
more...
Natalia Zhukova's curator insight, November 24, 2013 3:49 AM

I used to think video gaming could only destroy your sense of reality, develop isolation from society, alienation, even depersonalization and loss of identity in which the real self is replaced by virtual, emotions are inhibited and finally you end up with psychiatric disorders. This article changes my approach.

 

Alex Simon's curator insight, December 8, 2013 4:41 PM

i totally agree with this article. i think its really cool someone researched this and found this cool information.

Ella Cooper's curator insight, May 1, 2014 8:11 AM

Thought provoking study that has found a casual link between video gaming and volumetric brain increase. The possibilities for advancements in video gaming therapy for brain disorders could be close with future research. 

Scooped by Nicola Johnson
Scoop.it!

Video Gaming Can Increase Brain Size and Connectivity ...

Video Gaming Can Increase Brain Size and Connectivity ... | Psychology of Gaming | Scoop.it
A new study has found that video gaming can stimulate neurogenesis (growth of new neurons) and connectivity in the brain regions responsible for spatial orientation, memory formation and strategic planning, as well as, fine motor skills.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicola Johnson
Scoop.it!

Study: Games' link to aggression comes from challenge, not violence - Ars Technica

Study: Games' link to aggression comes from challenge, not violence - Ars Technica | Psychology of Gaming | Scoop.it
Study: Games' link to aggression comes from challenge, not violence Ars Technica Published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the study explored the ideas of the General Aggression Model—that exposure to violent media can snowball...
more...
No comment yet.