Psychology Matters
Follow
Find
5.6K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from :: The 4th Era ::
onto Psychology Matters
Scoop.it!

Good brain, bad brain: basics — University of Birmingham

Good brain, bad brain: basics — University of Birmingham | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

THIS IS A FREE COURSE

 

This course is designed to be an introduction to the human brain and aims to provide basic information and explanations for the non-specialist so that you may better understand your own amazing brain. We will look at what it’s made of, how these components are organised and how they function. This information is helping neuroscientists across the globe to understand how the brain is able to do everything from stopping you falling off your bike to making you feel sad that your football team lost their game to helping you learn how your brain works!

Like all specialist areas, neuroscience uses jargon such that a word or short phrase can carry the meaning of perhaps a paragraph of description. So, the basics of the brain course is designed to introduce you to this jargon and the key biological processes underpinning brain function. This means that, if you subsequently further your studies on the brain, you will be familiar and confident with the basics.


Via Miloš Bajčetić, Lynnette Van Dyke, Jim Lerman
Stewart-Marshall's insight:

Course starts on 27 January

more...
Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, January 7, 11:53 AM

MOOC by University of Birgmingham / FutureLearn

Starts on 27 January (duration 3 weeks)

Psychology Matters
Resources for students and practitioners in the field of psychology. [ Also see: http://xeeme.com/Stewart_Marshall ]
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

'Immortal' Region Discovered in Human Brain - Masters and PhDs

'Immortal' Region Discovered in Human Brain - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Scientists have discovered a part of the human brain that enjoys eternal youth.

Researchers said the latest findings show that at least one part of the human brain stays cognitively intact, regardless of age.

“Our studies have found that older and younger adults perform in a similar way on a range of visual and non-visual tasks that measure spatial attention,” researcher Dr. Joanna Brooks, who conducted the study as a Visiting Research Fellow with the University of Adelaide’s School of Psychology and the School of Medicine, said in a news release.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Human Nutrition - Understanding Macronutrient Metabolism - Masters and PhDs

Human Nutrition - Understanding Macronutrient Metabolism - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

In this free ALISON online course, the learner will be introduced to metabolism and the carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism pathways. The course will cover the various pathways of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids from glycogenesis to protein degradation.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Did OkCupid send a bunch of incompatible people on dates on purpose? - Masters and PhDs

Did OkCupid send a bunch of incompatible people on dates on purpose? - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Facebook is hardly the only web company to use its power over what users see for the sake of research. In a blog post Monday (thanks to UNC sociologist Zeynep Tufekci for the link), OkCupid’s Christian Rudder laid out three separate experiments the company has run on users.

What are we to make of manipulations like these? The findings are at least interesting. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Blood Test Could Detect A Genetic Tendency Toward Suicide - Masters and PhDs

Blood Test Could Detect A Genetic Tendency Toward Suicide - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

When it comes to fighting suicide, knowing who is at risk can be tricky and, moreover, a very subjective process. Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine are trying to bring a level of objectivity into the search for those at high risk of attempting suicide – in the form of a simple blood test.

In a new study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, researchers say they have found something of a common denominator in people who have committed suicide or those with suicidal thoughts or attempts. The key? A unique genetic mutation in the gene SKA2, which is thought to play an important role in the way our brains handle stress. Not everyone at risk of suicide has the genetic signature, but when people do have this mutation, their likelihood of attempting suicide was found to be extremely high compared to the rest of the population.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Why You Clicked on That Tweet: The Psychology of Twitter Engagement

Why You Clicked on That Tweet: The Psychology of Twitter Engagement | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

What does the academic field that has brought us Freudian theories have to do with the social network that popularized hashtags and play-by-play updates of Sunday brunches? 

More than you would think. We want to know what will motivate our followers to act -- and psychology can help you find out just that.

I’ve been monitoring and publishing to HubSpot’s Twitter account for the past couple of months. During this time, I've noticed that certain types of tweet copy elicit higher numbers of clicks and engagement -- and these types of copy align with several prominent psychological theories. 

To help you get your followers to better engage with your brand on Twitter, let's dive into four essential psychological theories.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Telepsychiatry startup CEO shares insights on telemedicine proposals - About Health Degrees

Telepsychiatry startup CEO shares insights on telemedicine proposals - About Health Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Two interesting developments in telemedicine punctuated the runup to Independence Day celebrations last week. CMS proposed adding more telemedicine codes that can be reimbursement, primarily in the realm of psychotherapy and psychoanlysis. Humayun Chaudry, CEO of the Federation of State Medical Boards, said the group is readying a compact that would make it easier to practice medicine across state lines with participating states. He expects the proposal to be ready to be reviewed by state medical boards at the end of the summer.

Telemedicine startup and DreamIT Ventures accelerator grad 1DocWay works with physician networks and psychiatric hospitals to provide telepsychiatry services for Medicare and Medicaid patients. For co-founder and CEO Samir Malik, every development is reason for encouragement. Of the two proposals, the compact from the Federation would have the biggest impact, if it succeeds. Although the CMS proposal would have a negligible impact on 1DocWay’s sales, it’s certainly a positive step.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Make Yourself Happier in the Next 5 Minutes - Masters and PhDs

5 Ways to Make Yourself Happier in the Next 5 Minutes - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Happiness is a lifelong pursuit of meaning, purpose, and fulfillment. But while it could take years of persistence to deeply transform your life, there are scientifically-tested strategies that have been shown to provide an immediate happiness boost. Such activities provide a modest but lingering increase in happiness, but when practiced consistently over time, they become happiness habits, energizing you to live your dreams and passions.

Here are 5 such strategies that you can practice right now, to get a shot of healthy psychological nutrients ...

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Comprehensive review shows no link between vaccinations and autism - About Health Degrees

Comprehensive review shows no link between vaccinations and autism - About Health Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

The first systematic international review of childhood vaccinations led by researchers from the University of Sydney has found no evidence of a link to the development of autism or autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).

 

The comprehensive review, published in medical journal Vaccine, examined five cohort studies involving more than 1.25 million children, an additional five case-control studies involving more than 9,920 children obtained via systematic searches of international medical databases MEDLINE, PubMed, EBASE and Google Scholar up to April 2014.

 

Both the cohort and case-control studies revealed no statistical data to support a relationship between childhood vaccination for the commonly-used vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough and the development of autism or ASDs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Psychologists: Parenthood Is a Traumatic Event | IdeaFeed | Big Think

Psychologists: Parenthood Is a Traumatic Event | IdeaFeed | Big Think | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Three to six months after becoming parents, a quarter of fathers and nearly half of all mothers exhibit signs of clinical depression, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. During the first five years of parenthood, both mothers and fathers report higher levels of dissatisfaction with their lives and a diminishment in the size of their network of family and friends. "A 2009 study in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that the transition to parenthood is linked to reduced happiness in the marriage and more negative behavior during spousal conflict."

 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic]

A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic] | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES
more...
Dorian Love's curator insight, June 27, 5:17 AM

Sweet music!

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, July 1, 10:47 AM


A bit of a edu-tisement for U.F. but this graphic has a ton of info points on music and it's value in learning.

Terry Doherty's curator insight, July 1, 12:44 PM

The bottom line is that U of F wants you to think about being a music educator. I really focused on the research about how music helps with language skills.

Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from positive psychology
Scoop.it!

Happiest places to live

Happiest places to live | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Gallup just released its survey on happiness around the world. The polling company looked at 138 countries. Here are the nations that ranked high in residents experiencing “a lot of positive emotions,” plus a few not-as-happy countries. We asked Eric Weiner, author of the “The Geography of Bliss ,’’ to share insights on a few of them. And here’s more global “Happy,’’ if you want it.

Via Sandeep Gautam
more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, June 18, 3:10 PM

In most happiness surveys its Denmark, Norway, Sweden that stand n top, but this time its countries from Latin America.....

Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from freedomoftheinternet
Scoop.it!

Sleep after learning strengthens connections between brain cells and enhances memory

Sleep after learning strengthens connections between brain cells and enhances memory | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

In study published today in Science, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center show for the first time that sleep after learning encourages the growth of dendritic spines, the tiny protrusions from brain cells that connect to other brain cells and facilitate the passage of  information across synapses, the junctions at which brain cells meet. Moreover, the activity of brain cells during deep sleep, or slow-wave sleep, after learning is critical for such growth.,


Via MARY HELEN FERRIS
more...
MARY HELEN FERRIS's curator insight, June 5, 2:59 PM

Credit: Wen-Biao Gan

"Now we know that when we learn something new, a neuron will grow new connections on a specific branch," says Dr. Gan. "Imagine a tree that grows leaves (spines) on one branch but not another branch. When we learn something new, it's like we're sprouting leaves on a specific branch."

Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from Innovations in Healthcare
Scoop.it!

The Movement for Patient Access to Doctors’ Notes Is Growing

The Movement for Patient Access to Doctors’ Notes Is Growing | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

To level the playing field, some believe patients should be able to see what their doctor is writing about them. But note-sharing with mental health patients has been slower to develop.

The OpenNotes initiative, which seeks to enable easier access for patients to doctor’s notes, might have helped. The idea is that if doctor’s notes were more transparent, then a patient would become more involved in their own treatment. And the “playing field” between doctor and patient also is leveled somewhat.

Delbanco said the use of OpenNotes—which he leads with Jan Walker, a registered nurse and researcher at Harvard Medical School—has grown from 13,500 patients to 3 million today.

But note-sharing with patients with mental health problems has been slower to develop. Concerns exist over whether a patient’s mental condition could worsen after reading what a psychologist has written about them, or whether a patient could feel objectified and pathologized.

“The instinct has been, ‘That’s different, mental health is different, don’t touch it’—I think that’s nonsense,” said Delbanco. “I think if you say you’re ill because your knee hurts, or I think you’re crazy because you think blue is green, you should be the first to know and my job would be to help you with that.”

 


Via Chaturika Jayadewa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

It's Hard to Imagine a World Without Psychology - Masters and PhDs

It's Hard to Imagine a World Without Psychology - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

The popular media portrays psychology in a variety of ways, from the reasonably accurate way that neuroscience is discussed in the TNT crime drama, Perception, to the silly but enjoyable use of “telepathy” in the USA network comedy Psych (now only shown in reruns). However, as readers of Psychology Today know, there are many practical applications of psychology in areas such as advice, mental health, and relationships. People seek interventions in the form of psychological counseling, guidance, psychotherapy, and help with substance abuse, couple, or family problems.

Without psychological research, these applications to treatment would not be possible. In addition, psychologists study a range of problems in basic science, such as the role of the brain in behavior, changes in the mind and body in development, processes of learning, memory, sensation and perception, and the ways that people think about others and the world in areas such as social cognition, attitudes, and stereotyping.

Read more at: http://masters-phds.com/hard-imagine-world-without-psychology/ ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Stress, Anxiety, Loneliness: How This Entrepreneur Lost Himself and Bounced Back Stronger - Masters and PhDs

Stress, Anxiety, Loneliness: How This Entrepreneur Lost Himself and Bounced Back Stronger - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

He was in the process of building what is now a $16 million trendy data-driven dining startup called Dinner Lab. Many would have loved to trade spots with him. Things were happening fast.

But he wasn’t able to focus in conversations. He was often overcome with an odd, out-of-reality sensation where he would watch people’s mouths move, but couldn’t concentrate on their words.

Bordainick had fallen into that perfect maelstrom of stress, anxiety and too much to do. He had hit that infamous and clichéd “wall.”

 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from Studying Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

In Fatal Flash, Gaza Psychologist Switches Roles, Turning Into a Trauma Victim - Masters and PhDs

In Fatal Flash, Gaza Psychologist Switches Roles, Turning Into a Trauma Victim - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Hassan al-Zeyada has spent decades counseling fellow residents of the Gaza Strip who experience psychological trauma. Now, as he prepares to aid his neighbors after a new round of combat and carnage, he has a challenging new patient: himself.

An Israeli airstrike demolished Dr. Zeyada’s family home on July 20, killing six close relatives, including his mother and three of his brothers.

“You try to help the people with their suffering,” the doctor said recently in his Gaza City living room, lined with psychology textbooks. “It’s totally different when you have the same experience. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

A $650 Million Donation for Psychiatric Research - Masters and PhDs

A $650 Million Donation for Psychiatric Research - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Late on Monday, the Broad Institute, a biomedical research center, announced a $650 million donation for psychiatric research from the Stanley Family Foundation — one of the largest private gifts ever for scientific research. It comes at a time when basic research into mental illness is sputtering, and many drug makers have all but abandoned the search for new treatments.

Despite decades of costly research, experts have learned virtually nothing about the causes of psychiatric disorders and have developed no truly novel drug treatments in more than a quarter century. Broad Institute officials hope that Mr. Stanley’s donation will change that, and they timed their announcement to coincide with the publication of the largest analysis to date on the genetics of schizophrenia.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Rethink Your Thoughts about Thinking - Masters and PhDs

Rethink Your Thoughts about Thinking - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Your beliefs about the way you think can shape your life in surprising ways. A spate of recent findings suggest that targeting such metacognition can help relieve mood and anxiety disorders, and it may even reduce symptoms of psychosis.

Metacognition often takes the form of a value judgment about one’s thoughts, such as “It’s bad that I overanalyze everything.” Research has shown that these metacognitive beliefs can play an important role in obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression and generalized anxiety disorder, among others. In particular, they may matter more than the way we frame situations in our mind, such as by focusing on the negative aspects of a life event. That framing, called cognitive appraisal, is typically addressed in psychotherapy, but metacognition is not, perhaps to the patient’s detriment, explains psychologist Jennifer L. Hudson of Macquarie University in Australia.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Organizational Psychology Masters - Masters and PhDs

Organizational Psychology Masters - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

An organizational psychologist seeks to understand human behavior in organizational settings and applies behavioral principles and research findings to bring about change in these settings. Thus, they need to know: how groups function; negotiation strategies, problem solving techniques, and group cohesion methods; and, how to increase motivation and improve workplace performance.

A psychology MBA or other organizational psychology masters program prepares you to meet these expectations.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from Sports and Performance Psychology
Scoop.it!

Psychological Factors Predict Soccer Injuries - Brain Blogger (blog)

Psychological Factors Predict Soccer Injuries - Brain Blogger (blog) | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

“Psychological Factors Predict Soccer Injuries Brain Blogger (blog) “Interest in the pathogenesis of sport injuries has led to the general conclusion that two major factors influence injury vulnerability: external factors (e.g.”


Via Luis Valdes
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

The Science and Psychology of Twitter: Why We Follow and Share - Masters and PhDs

The Science and Psychology of Twitter: Why We Follow and Share - Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Researchers have discovered trends in the way that we perform every major action on Twitter—favoriting, updating, sharing, and following. And there’s even an interesting bit of psychology behind what makes Twitter so attractive in the first place. Here’s a look at the psychology of Twitter: what makes us follow, favorite, share and keep coming back for more.

A study published by the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence sought to put our myriad favoriting methods into categories. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stewart-Marshall
Scoop.it!

Facebook tinkered with users' emotions in experiment

Facebook tinkered with users' emotions in experiment | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Facebook has been playing with its users' emotions, and now a lot of people are upset.

For one week in 2012, hundreds of thousands of Facebook users were unknowingly subjected to an experiment in which their news feed was altered to see whether certain kinds of content made users happy or sad.

The research that resulted from that experiment, which was published in an academic journal this month, said emotions appeared to be contagious: If users saw happier posts from friends in their Facebook news feed, they were more likely to post their own happy updates. Sad updates appeared to have a comparable effect.

In other words, the study seems to show you are what you eat, as the saying goes -- except in that metaphor, you usually get to choose what you put in your mouth.

We were concerned that exposure to friends' negativity might lead people to avoid visiting Facebook.- Adam D.I. Kramer, Facebook data scientist 

Now, Facebook, which uses a secret algorithm to control what it shows users on its popular news feed, faces another round of allegations that the world's largest social-media network is being a little too creepy and manipulative.

After the study started to receive widespread scrutiny on the Web, Adam D.I. Kramer, a data scientist at Facebook and one of the study's authors, wrote in a post Sunday: "In hindsight, the research benefits of the paper may not have justified all of this anxiety."

Kramer added that he and the paper's coauthors were "very sorry for the way the paper described the research and any anxiety it caused."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from Effective Education
Scoop.it!

Research Shows Secret to Beating Depression in Adolescents - Tim Elmore

Research Shows Secret to Beating Depression in Adolescents - Tim Elmore | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
You probably heard the phrase growing up: “It’s better to give than to receive.” Well, the University of Illinois just proved this to be true — at least, if you’re an adolescent.

Their study discovered that 15-16 year-old students who invest energy in pro-social activities such as giving their money to family members or serving a charity are less likely to suffer any level of depression than those who get a bigger thrill from taking risks or keeping the money for themselves. 

The university researchers detailed their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study focused on the ventral striatum, a region of the brain that regulates feelings of pleasure in response to rewards. Previous studies revealed that ventral striatum activity tends to be more vivid in adolescence, suggesting that teens experience the pleasure of rewards more intensely than younger kids or adults. In short, during the teen years, everything’s exaggerated. Adolescence is a time of expanded risk-taking — and this can be both good and bad, depending on the young person, suggests Illinois psychology professor Eva Telzer, who led the study. Why is this? Depressive symptoms tend to increase during teen years, Dr. Telzer reports. So, kids may respond by taking foolish risks…or they can risk involvement in an altruistic cause they believe in, and gain great satisfaction, hence warding off natural depression.

 


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 19, 1:10 AM

simple idea, and an old-fashioned one.  Taking risks in giving for others has more benefit than taking risks for self-centered reasons.  This might be the reason most of the schools I work with have active community service elements in their curriculum. -Lon

Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from High Functioning Autism
Scoop.it!

Study Reports: Pollution May Be Causing Autism - USFinancePost

Study Reports: Pollution May Be Causing Autism - USFinancePost | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

A study recently posted in the United States National Library of Medicine has linked air pollution with the development of neurological and behavioral health problems. Specific conditions that the study links pollution to include: cognitive decline, autism, schizophrenia, and depression.

Although the study involved mice, researchers concluded that, “Our findings suggest alteration of developmentally important neurochemicals and lateral ventricle dilation may be mechanistically related to observations linking ambient air pollutant exposure and adverse neurological/neurodevelopmental outcome in humans.” In other words, the biological effect of pollution in mice is likely to be similar to what occurs in humans.

The mice in the study were exposed to air samples similar to what is found in Los Angeles, Atlanta, New York City, and Boston. Following the exposure, the mice developed permanent inflammation and a specific neurotransmitter that is typically found in patients with schizophrenia or autism.

 


Read more at http://usfinancepost.com/study-reports-pollution-may-be-causing-autism-19702.html#zF13jujfV7G62RD8.99


Via Richard Dolinski
more...
Richard Dolinski's curator insight, June 10, 3:39 AM

Leaves me with more questions than answers. 

Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from Sports and Performance Psychology
Scoop.it!

The Psychology of Sports Injury StressSelectScience

The Psychology of Sports Injury StressSelectScience | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Sports injury prediction has previously relied upon physiological parameters but this research into Swedish premier league and international footballers focuses on the psychological factors involved in injury prevention and recovery.

In an interesting paper published in 2013 (Journal of Sport Rehabilitation(Ivarsson, Johnson & Podlog, 2013 and discussed here), Andreas Ivarsson and Urban Johnson from Halmstad University discuss the relevance of psychological factors on a footballers’ level of injury susceptibility and recovery. 


Via Luis Valdes
more...
No comment yet.