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Sports Psychology Programs

Sports Psychology Programs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Find out more about sport psychology study, what's involved, what the prospects are, and locate suitable sports psychology programs.
Stewart-Marshall's insight:

Linking sport and psychology in one degree is a relatively recent phenomenon.  And yet so much of performing well in sport is about motivation, stress, endurance, will power - all psychological factors.  So it is surprising that our psychological knowledge about such factors has not been applied to sport in a scientific way before.

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Psychology Matters
Resources for students and practitioners in the field of psychology.  [ Also see: http://www.healthforworld.com ]
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15 Terrifying Statistics About Cell Phone Addiction [Infographic] by Ayana Lage

15 Terrifying Statistics About Cell Phone Addiction [Infographic] by Ayana Lage | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Cell phone addiction is a real problem––learn more about what causes it.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, May 24, 1:23 AM
Le monde numérique jusque dans le lit. Cela vaut la peine de jeter un coup d'oeil sur ces statistiques.
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Lateral Thinking - How can Lateral Thinking help you? | #Creativity #ProblemSolving

Lateral Thinking - How can Lateral Thinking help you? | #Creativity #ProblemSolving | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

With logic you start out with certain ingredients just as in playing chess you start out with given pieces. But what are those pieces? In most real life situations the pieces are not given, we just assume they are there. We assume certain perceptions, certain concepts and certain boundaries. Lateral thinking is concerned not with playing with the existing pieces but with seeking to change those very pieces. Lateral thinking is concerned with the perception part of thinking. This is where we organise the external world into the pieces we can then 'process'.

A healthy human brain does not want to always be creative, it is designed to figure out how to do things or how to think about things and then 'locks' that automatic response or behaviour into a subconscious process so that your conscious brain can focus on other matters.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Thinking

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Think-Different

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Think+outside+the+box

 


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Matt Manfredi's curator insight, May 14, 9:08 PM
Thanks Gus-A healthy human brain does not want to always be creative, it is designed to figure out how to do things or how to think about things and then 'locks' that automatic response or behaviour into a subconscious process so that your conscious brain can focus on other matters.
Begoña Pabón's curator insight, May 15, 4:24 PM
Pensar de forma diferente...mirar mas allá de lo evidente... conduce a soluciones inesperadas a viejos problemas.
Andrea Mejia Medina's curator insight, May 23, 7:38 PM
Lateral thinking is the art of looking at things sideways, and not choosing the obvious answer. When we think laterally, we look a little bit deeper into things. Lateral thinking makes new ideas posible If we are able to look at things differently, and make an unlikely connection, this will take us to a new way of problem solving, as suggested by O’Sullivan, 2008, “search as far outside the boundaries of convention as you can” (p.57). Lateral thinking leads us away from the rules and structure we normally encounter; this can be a mental block on our creativity.
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The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement

The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Metacognition, simply put, is the process of thinking about thinking. It is important in every aspect of school and life, since it involves self-reflection on one’s current position, future goals, potential actions and strategies, and results. At its core, it is a basic survival strategy, and has been shown to be present even in rats.

Perhaps the most important reason for developing metacognition is that it can improve the application of knowledge, skills, and character qualities in realms beyond the immediate context in which they were learned. This can result in the transfer of competencies across disciplines—important for students preparing for real-life situations where clear-cut divisions of disciplines fall away and one must select competencies from the entire gamut of their experience to effectively apply them to the challenges at hand. Even within academic settings, it is valuable—and often necessary—to apply principles and methods across disciplinary lines.

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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, April 2, 10:28 PM
Metacognition is so very important to improved learning and achievement. Check this article out!
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 11, 4:20 PM
The 16 Habits of Mind (Costa and Kallick) include metacognition.
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, April 18, 12:13 PM
We allow extra time each period so teachers can talk about thinking process in their content area and students can think about thinking. It can improve the application of what they are studying, which provides deeper learning.
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Stop Wanting And Start Doing: 5 Practices For Building Mental Toughness

Stop Wanting And Start Doing: 5 Practices For Building Mental Toughness | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

I’ve been asked on a number of occasions the “secret” to harnessing mental toughness to overcome adversity. The “secret,” I tell them, isn’t a secret but a fact that they don’t want to hear because it’s simple. But simple isn’t easy. That secret is this: make a decision and go with it.

That’s it.

I remember waiting for Hell Week to begin in BUD/S (Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training) and students asking the instructors—in a somewhat uncommon cordial setting—what the secret was to making it through five and a half days of constant, nonstop activity. Here’s what the instructors said, “The secret to making it through BUD/S, is knowing you’re going to make it through BUD/S.”

It’s belief.

You need to believe that you’re the type of person who has the skill and will to make that goal happen, and then make it happen. Don’t worry about what’s right and don’t wait for the perfect opportunity because “perfect” doesn’t exist—it’s an excuse to procrastinate.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 28, 6:17 PM

Mental toughness is a muscle, and like all other muscles, it demands consistent exercise to get stronger.

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A List of 26 Gratitude Exercises, Activities, Worksheets, Games, and Ideas

A List of 26 Gratitude Exercises, Activities, Worksheets, Games, and Ideas | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Use this list of 26 gratitude exercises to develop your own gratitude practice or use these worksheets to teach others about the science of happiness!

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Are we headed toward an Artificial Brain?

Are we headed toward an Artificial Brain? | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Are we headed toward an Artificial Brain?

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 5, 4:12 AM
The artificial brain is moving towards a reality today. Artificial intelligence and fuzzy logic becoming by-words in today's world of technology, the days when an artificial brain substitutes a biological brain are really not very far away.
 
hurtfulremnant's comment, April 5, 5:07 AM
Thats beneficial...
lazaretrichard's comment, April 7, 3:47 AM
excellent
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50 Companies Leading the Artificial Intelligence Revolution

50 Companies Leading the Artificial Intelligence Revolution | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
A look at the most promising global startups working with artificial intelligence.

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prgnewshawaii's curator insight, March 2, 11:03 PM

Intriguing article from reporter Farid Mheir.  The business world is rapidly changing thanks to artificial intelligence.  Here's a look at some of the top companies leading AI revolution.

Russell Roberts

Hawaii Intelligence Digest

https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com

https://paper.li/f-1482109921

Magaly Siméon's curator insight, March 7, 1:00 AM

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

The US is leading the AI revolution, for now. Surprised not to see Montreal in the list...

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Learning In The Age Of Digital Distraction

Learning In The Age Of Digital Distraction | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
There needs to be some positive acceptance that young people are going to use this technology. I don't think that just denying it is reasonable. I also don't think an extended period of removing technology is likely to be helpful. I think that it is reasonable to take technology "time outs," to have environments and maybe even times where the family interacts with each other and not the outside world through texts. It's sort of a return to the dinner table as a place where you learn how to engage in face-to-face, meaningful contact. Put your tech aside. You can return to it afterwards.

And I think to lead by example is critical because we now know that parents are as guilty as their kids in pulling out a phone during a dinner conversation and texting. I think that that is really critical just to say it has to be balanced and we're going to practice how to balance it as a family.

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Ines Bieler's curator insight, March 10, 8:44 AM

Interesting take!

MartinVermaak's comment, March 10, 9:45 AM
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Oana Juncu's curator insight, March 14, 4:36 AM
Digital distraction triggers multi potentials
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Quiet In The Classroom: How To Recognize And Support Introverted learners via Robyn D. Shulman

Quiet In The Classroom: How To Recognize And Support Introverted learners via Robyn D. Shulman | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
The top five ways to support introverted students and young entrepreneurs in the classroom.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 28, 4:22 PM
Introverts are often reflecting and gathering their thoughts in the heat of the conversation. Stopping and giving people time to write their thoughts down can be helpful.
Elizabeth Lim's comment, March 4, 1:52 AM
Finally. An article that actually acknowledges the difference between shyness and introversion. There is finally some warmth in the world. But seriously, I agree that introverts are highly misunderstood by many educators who pressurise more reserved and thoughtful students to speak up and behave more like extroverts, which honestly is EXTREMELY annoying and also makes us introverts feel ostracised and unaccepted for who we are. I think it will be good for people to understand that being outspoken or able to communicate well verbally is not the be-all end-all quality for students to achieve, and instead of getting students to follow a rigid model of what a "good" student should be, I think it is more beneficial to students to allow us to do things and express ourselves in ways we are comfortable with so as to bring out the best of our abilities.
Willem Kuypers's curator insight, March 6, 3:42 AM
 Voilà un sujet dont on parle peu, mais qui vaut la peine d'être reconnu : les introvertis en situation d'apprentissage.
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20 Great iPad Apps to Help Learners Explore Their Creativity via @medkh9

20 Great iPad Apps to Help Learners Explore Their Creativity via @medkh9 | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, February 19, 3:39 PM
Quelques bonnes applications !
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Ten Habits Of Incredibly Happy People

Ten Habits Of Incredibly Happy People | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

We’re always chasing something—be it a promotion, a new car, or a significant other. This leads to the belief that, “When (blank) happens, I’ll finally be happy.”

 

While these major events do make us happy at first, research shows this happiness doesn’t last. A study from Northwestern University measured the happiness levels of regular people against those who had won large lottery prizes the year prior. The researchers were surprised to discover that the happiness ratings of both groups were practically identical.


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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, February 15, 6:10 PM

Happiness can be here and now. It does not have to be elusive.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, February 15, 10:04 PM
They say happiness that is bought with money will not last! Happiness, it seems is an attitude towards life. It is something that can be inculcated and developed. It means that if you train yourself to be positive in life, or, for that effect, if you teach yourself to appreciate life, the flowers, the rising sun, or others, then you might be teaching yourself to be happy!
 
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How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | #Research

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | #Research | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

— Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.


— Varying the studying environment — by hitting the books in, say, a cafe or garden rather than only hunkering down in the library, or even by listening to different background music — can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.

— A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.

— Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it, according to work by researchers including Henry Roediger III and Jeffrey Karpicke. (Roediger has co-authored his own book, “Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.”)

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/time-the-most-important-factor-neglected-in-education/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 


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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, September 26, 2016 2:49 AM
Leren: Er is geen geijkte weg voor. 
David Picard Roussel's curator insight, January 31, 7:47 AM

[ À tous ceux qui ont un cerveau V.A. ] Avez-vous déjà essayé ces méthodes d'apprentissage? Est-ce que dans vos équipes de travail vous tentez d'appliquer certaines de ces méthodes?

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Cognitive bias cheat sheet

Cognitive bias cheat sheet | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
I’ve spent many years referencing Wikipedia’s list of cognitive biases whenever I have a hunch that a certain type of thinking is an official bias but I can’t recall the name or details. It’s been an…

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 22, 5:42 AM
Cognitive bias cheat sheet
 
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Why the AI hype cycle won’t end anytime soon | #ArtificialIntelligence #Future 

Why the AI hype cycle won’t end anytime soon | #ArtificialIntelligence #Future  | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Eric Schmidt, the executive chairman of Alphabet, says AI can be harnessed to help solve major challenges like climate change, food security, and many other problems in health care, energy, and other critical sectors. Machine learning algorithms can directly analyze thousands of previous cases of different types of diseases and make their own conclusions as to what constitutes a sick individual versus a healthy individual, and consequently help diagnose dangerous conditions including cancer. Also, the technology is being fed big data to help scientists understand and predict the effects of climate change.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=AI

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 18, 7:36 PM
Eric Schmidt, the executive chairman of Alphabet, says AI can be harnessed to help solve major challenges like climate change, food security, and many other problems in health care, energy, and other critical sectors. Machine learning algorithms can directly analyze thousands of previous cases of different types of diseases and make their own conclusions as to what constitutes a sick individual versus a healthy individual, and consequently help diagnose dangerous conditions including cancer. Also, the technology is being fed big data to help scientists understand and predict the effects of climate change.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=AI

 

Paul B.'s curator insight, May 18, 8:35 PM
Most young people are interested in the AI concept from popular culture (movies, computer games); this invites their interest and relates it to real-world learning (links to Maths/science.).
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How to Tell If You Have a Fixed or a Growth Mindset [Infographic] via Lee Watanabe Crockett

How to Tell If You Have a Fixed or a Growth Mindset [Infographic] via Lee Watanabe Crockett | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
by Lee Watanabe Crockett

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Laurie Chiu-Mar's curator insight, May 15, 1:50 PM
Always have an open mind...
Hannah Jacobs's curator insight, May 19, 6:31 PM
I want to encourage my students to have a GROWTH mindset.  I also need to remember this for myself as I move through my teaching journey.
Ella Barresi's comment, May 22, 12:17 AM
@Hannah Jacobs it is so important for us to remember to lead by example. I think it's important for students to see that teachers don't always get it right, but they're willing to work at it and keep making things better. A GROWTH Mindset is so important. Good luck on your teaching journey!
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Let’s learn about Learning

Let’s learn about Learning | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Self-awareness of how people learn individuals and in teams becomes the springboard for change and innovative growth. To make learning meaningful, understandable, and motivating requires continued exploration in some basic learning principles: engagement, connection, interaction, attention, memory, intervention, and reflection.

Our ability to continuously learn and adapt the extent to which we thrive in today's organizations, in our personal lives, and in these disruptive times. By examining strategies for learning at the pace of change, based on learning analytics of LyndaCampus users, as well as exploring the recent research, data, and practices in neuroscience and the cognitive sciences, we are able to see behaviors and actions that make learning Easier and better.

The marriage of studies in the areas of learning, neuroscience, and cognitive science is moving what educators knew anecdotally to a data-driven understanding of how people learn-and how people can learn better. In an age of access to all knowledge, exploring learning principles or what I term learning strategies is the great gift educators can give students and colleagues.


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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 13, 7:11 AM

I often say, “Learning is complicated. If it weren’t, there’d be an app for it.” So for the moment, learning how to learn is one of the most valuable endeavors we can give to this generation of continuous learners.

 

Self-awareness of how people learn as individuals and in teams becomes the springboard for change and innovative growth. To make learning meaningful, understandable, and motivating requires continued exploration in some basic learning principles: engagement, connection, interaction, attention, memory, intervention, and reflection.

Our ability to continuously learn and adapt determines the extent to which we thrive in today's organizations, in our personal lives, and in these disruptive times. By examining strategies for learning at the pace of change, based on learning analytics data of LyndaCampus users, as well as exploring the recent research, data, and practices in neuroscience and the cognitive sciences, we are able to see behaviors and actions that make learning easier and better.

The marriage of studies in the areas of learning, neuroscience, and cognitive science is moving what educators knew anecdotally to a data-driven understanding of how people learn—and how people can learn better. In an age of access to all knowledge, exploring learning principles or what I term learning strategies is the great gift educators can give students and colleagues.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/12/19/teaching-was-yesterday-today-is-coaching-the-learners-students-for-learning-to-learn/

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Learning+2+Learn

 

 

 

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Artifical Intelligence, the Future of Work, and Implications for Education

Artifical Intelligence, the Future of Work, and Implications for Education | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Human life is about more than work and productivity. The value of a human life is not measured by that person’s demand in the workforce. I believe that we are wise to reinforce and celebrate this message. We can also strive to create deeply human and compassionate communities where people learn and connect.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, April 11, 5:31 AM

A very interesting read.

Lucas Jubb's curator insight, April 13, 12:17 PM

Artificial Intelligence has its place but it will never replace human interaction.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/luke-jubb-138026125/

Volkmar Langer's curator insight, April 14, 1:01 PM
An very interessting article:"AI and the world of robotics is changing life and work. It will continue to do so, and this has important implications for education. It is time for us to invest the necessary time and effort to think through these implications."
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eConfidence | Confidence in behaviour changes through serious games | #ModernEDU 

eConfidence | Confidence in behaviour changes through serious games | #ModernEDU  | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

The project aims at researching the use of serious game for positive behavioural changes.

 

Serious games have become a popular tool for knowledge transfer, behavioural, perceptual or cognitive change, but at the same time, their effectiveness has been analysed in several studies aiming to answer the question whether they are an effective instrument for behaviour change.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Behavior+Change

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 4, 11:44 AM

The project aims at researching the use of serious game for positive behavioural changes.

 

Serious games have become a popular tool for knowledge transfer, behavioural, perceptual or cognitive change, but at the same time, their effectiveness has been analysed in several studies aiming to answer the question whether they are an effective instrument for behaviour change.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Behavior+Change

 

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The neuroscience of asking insightful questions

The neuroscience of asking insightful questions | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
I teach coaching skills to leaders. When I get to the section on how to ask questions (an important part of learning to coach) I might ask a trick question to start off: “How many of you are good at solving problems?”. Without fail, almost all hands shoot enthusiastically into the air. There’s nothing wrong …

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Chris Carter's curator insight, March 23, 8:12 PM
We are not guiding if we are solving for the kids. We need to guide kids to their own solutions to the challenges that they face. Asking questions rather than giving answers tests our patience and our desire to "help," but we do not help if we simply give answers. 
Marshall Alston's curator insight, March 27, 1:35 PM
Depending on what you are trying to learn will depend on how you ask a question.
R's curator insight, April 6, 1:23 PM
Telling = Status Quo
Insightful Questions = Activated Brains!
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How to Humanize Your Online Class (Infographic and slideshow)

How to Humanize Your Online Class (Infographic and slideshow) | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Humanized learning increases the relevance of content and improves students' motivation to log-in week-after-week. When students relate to an online instructor as something more than a subject matter expert and begin to conceive of themselves as part of a larger community, they are more likely to be motivated, be satisfied with their learning, and succeed in achieving the course objectives (Picciano, 2002; Rovai & Barnum, 2003;  Richardson & Swan, 2003).

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, March 9, 1:00 PM

Click through to a great infographic with a powerful presentation slideshow feature.  These are ideas that EVERY online teacher should know. 

Nathalie Ferret's curator insight, March 21, 8:38 AM
"Very thorough guidelines" ...
Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, April 24, 4:30 PM
Nice infographic :)
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Infographic: Deeper Learning

Infographic: Deeper Learning | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it


What Deeper Learning is all about?


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 1, 1:37 AM
Deeper Learning
Mark Cottee's curator insight, March 1, 5:34 PM
Learning a new language at the moment and believe this system is very applicable 
Nina de Rochemont's curator insight, March 1, 11:33 PM
Smart Education Practices
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Harnessing the Incredible Learning Potential of the Adolescent Brain | #LEARNing2LEARN #Research

Harnessing the Incredible Learning Potential of the Adolescent Brain | #LEARNing2LEARN #Research | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
“[Adolescence is] a stage of life when we can really thrive, but we need to take advantage of the opportunity,” said Temple University neuroscientist Laurence Steinberg at a Learning and the Brain conference in Boston. Steinberg has spent his career studying how the adolescent brain develops and believes there is a fundamental disconnect between the popular characterizations of adolescents and what’s really going on in their brains.

Because the brain is still developing during adolescence, it has incredible plasticity. It’s akin to the first five years of life, when a child’s brain is growing and developing new pathways all the time in response to experiences. Adult brains are somewhat plastic as well — otherwise they wouldn’t be able to learn new things — but “brain plasticity in adulthood involves minor changes to existing circuits, not the wholesale development of new ones or elimination of others,” Steinberg said.

 

The adolescent brain is exquisitely sensitive to experience,” Steinberg said. “It is like the recording device is turned up to a different level of sensitivity.” That’s why humans tend to remember even the most mundane events from adolescence much better than even important events that took place later in life. It also means adolescence could be an extremely important window for learning that sticks. Steinberg notes this window is also lengthening as scientists observe the onset of puberty happening earlier and young people taking on adult roles later in life. Between these two factors, one biological and one social, adolescence researchers now generally say the period lasts 15 years between the ages of 10 and 25.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 

Use #Andragogy UP from 11 years:

 

 https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/andragogy-adult-teaching-how-to-teach-ict/

 


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Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 5, 2016 2:44 AM

Useful post, presenting an interesting vision of the theme. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish I also recommend the site http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, November 5, 2016 7:04 AM
The problem is that many high schools confuse “challenging work” with “amount of work.”
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, February 22, 10:00 AM

It seems like boredom is deadly to the learning process and that's exactly what high school students report is what is happening to them in most schools - The lack of challenge. k-Lon

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21 ways to unlock creative genius | #Creativity #Infographic 

21 ways to unlock creative genius | #Creativity #Infographic  | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Click this link to access the Infographic:

 

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C318Ja6XAAE7dOD.jpg:large

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Creativity

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=creativity

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 4, 4:12 PM

Click this link to access the Infographic:

 

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C318Ja6XAAE7dOD.jpg:large

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Creativity

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=creativity

 

Allan Shaw's curator insight, February 5, 5:01 PM
This is a great infographic. As a former visual arts teacher and design and technology teacher, I have used and taught these techniques for many decades. There is no novelty here; these techniques have been around for longer than me but they do work if they are fostered and practiced.
Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance (It's Going to Surprise You)

The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance (It's Going to Surprise You) | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Imagine you could have a skill where--in any given conversation with colleagues, clients, or subordinates--you could be keenly aware of, and even experience, their feelings and thoughts.

 

Sounds like some X-Men-like psychic superpower right? Well, what if I told you that anyone can have this uncanny ability and use its strength and charm to have successful conversations?

 

Well, you can. The superpower I refer to is called empathy.

 

But this skill--and it is a learned skill available to anyone--is often misunderstood because there are variations of it. I'll get to the science of it shortly.


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Ian Berry's curator insight, February 6, 7:12 PM
Great insights into present day and future leadership. DDI report well worth reviewing too
chris chopyak's curator insight, February 6, 9:37 PM
I will take super powers any day!
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 8, 5:05 AM
The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance
Rescooped by Stewart-Marshall from Cultivating Creativity
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According to Research, Procrastinating Can Boost Your Creativity

According to Research, Procrastinating Can Boost Your Creativity | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Procrastination improves creativity
Art is never finished, only abandoned.” — Leonardo da Vinci
Everything left undone is always still very much on your mind most of the time. You get to think about it more often than tasks you have completed. This encourages you to think about new ways to improve or do it better.

 

Adrienne Branson of Canva says:
“Unfinished work is hard for your mind to let go of — in a good way. Your mind keeps churning, considering other options, creative solutions to the problem. Ever had a project that you just couldn’t stop talking, thinking, or dreaming about? This is how you make that happen.”

 

"The procrastination thought process works best for people who are working on innovative projects and need creative ideas for solve pending problems. You probably won’t benefit from procrastination if you have to deliver on tasks at the office and have strict deadlines to meet.

 

"Innovators and creative professionals use procrastination to their benefit more often than everyone else. Leonardo Da Vinci was a famous procrastinator. He finished the Mona Lisa in 1517 despite having started it in 1503."

 


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John Rudkin's curator insight, February 12, 3:31 AM
I don't know about you - but I never count anytime I do by way of design "finished".  Its an Art.