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9 Signs That Neuroscience Has Entered The Classroom

9 Signs That Neuroscience Has Entered The Classroom | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

While neuroscience hasn’t yet radically changed the way we think about teaching and learning, it is helping to shape educational policies and influencing new ways of implementing technology, improving special education, and streamlining day-to-day interactions between teachers and students. While there is still a long way to go before we truly understand the science of learning and how to use those findings in the real world classroom, it’s important to highlight some of the key ways that neuroscience is changing the classroom of today for the better.


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Psychology Matters
Resources for students and practitioners in the field of psychology.  [ Also see: http://www.healthforworld.com ]
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What Makes A Great Culture -- And Why Do People Care?

What Makes A Great Culture -- And Why Do People Care? | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

How many people do you know who seem to have an amazing job and workplace…but are still miserable every day? Their office is brand new—beautiful, tall-ceilinged, spick-and-span. They’ve got coffee and juices and gym memberships at their fingertips (at no cost, of course), and an on-site masseuse or childcare specialist. They may even have unlimited vacation time or work-from-home days. Yet, something is off. Even though the office is saturated with top-of-the-line perks, something is missing—a spark that could inspire them to truly love what they do.

 

That missing spark, as you probably know, comes down to culture. Organizations with great cultures provide certain benefits that perks-saturated workplaces can’t deliver. These are the things that build the kind of workplaces that inspire loyalty, happiness, health, and greatness. And they’re not usually things that break the bank, either. Keep reading to discover the top traits, we’ve found, that make a great culture—along with examples from businesses that embody each one. Has your organization embraced them yet?


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Gisele HELOU's curator insight, September 23, 4:15 AM

Perks, cool work spaces, and free lunch are awesome. But, what really makes great cultures are the intangible things—the attitudes, the relationships, and understanding of a shared vision.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, September 23, 6:56 AM
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Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, September 24, 12:28 AM
PresenceAtWork (www.presenceatwork.com) specialises in helping organisations create a culture where people really appreciate and understand the value of their own unique traits and strengths and those of their teammates, and help you leverage the whole.  Read why it matters...
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Julie Lythcott-Haims: How to raise successful kids - without over-parenting (1 language + 100 vocab)

TED link ► http://www.ted.com/talks/julie_lythcott_haims_how_to_raise_successful_kids_without_over_parenting ;


By loading kids with high expectations and micromanaging their lives at every turn, parents aren't actually helping. At least, that's how Julie Lythcott-Haims sees it. With passion and wry humor, the former Dean of Freshmen at Stanford makes the case for parents to stop defining their children's success via grades and test scores. Instead, she says, they should focus on providing the oldest idea of all: unconditional love.

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In this video, Julie Lythcott-Haims makes the case for parents to stop defining their children's success via grades and test scores, and Instead focus on providing unconditional love.
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Innovations in STEM Education: Technology to Support Students with Autism

Innovations in STEM Education: Technology to Support Students with Autism | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Brought to you by the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Offices of Special Education Programs and STEM Initiatives

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CTD Institute's curator insight, August 31, 3:24 PM
September 15, 3- 4:30 PM EST- A panel of presenters will share their leading-edge research and experience in developing technology supports to give students with autism access to STEM curricula and activities.
Panel: 
Dr. Maya Israel: University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, Dr. Matt Marino: University of Central Florida, Dr. Amelia Moody: University of North Carolina-Wilmington, and Dr. Jeff Munson: University of Washington. 
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Learning: It's All About the Connections

Learning: It's All About the Connections | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Connection and all of its implications is one of the most important concepts in understanding, engaging in, and facilitating powerful learning experiences.


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Julie Cumming-Debrot's curator insight, July 7, 2015 2:38 AM

Thanks for sharing Marco.  Brilliant.

Carolyn Williams's curator insight, July 10, 2015 6:37 AM

It is ..

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 11, 2015 9:49 AM

It is really true, learning is totally about connections.

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How You Know You Need a Tech Break (and What to Do About It)

How You Know You Need a Tech Break (and What to Do About It) | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Taking a tech break is easy when you know how to do it, when, and why. Here is some helpful information for staying "tech healthy."

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 6, 1:01 AM

Think that's what I need.

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Neuroscientists say multitasking literally drains the energy reserves of your brain

Neuroscientists say multitasking literally drains the energy reserves of your brain | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Does your morning routine consist of checking emails, browsing Facebook, downing coffee, heading to the train while Googling one last idea, checking notifications, more coffee, and going through your work email? The very myriad of activities crammed into your morning, and the constant switching between them, is likely making you very tired.

When we attempt to multitask, we don’t actually do more than one activity at once, but quickly switch between them. And this switching is exhausting. It uses up oxygenated glucose in the brain, running down the same fuel that’s needed to focus on a task.

“That switching comes with a biological cost that ends up making us feel tired much more quickly than if we sustain attention on one thing,” says Daniel Levitin, professor of behavioral neuroscience at McGill University. “People eat more, they take more caffeine. Often what you really need in that moment isn’t caffeine, but just a break. If you aren’t taking regular breaks every couple of hours, your brain won’t benefit from that extra cup of coffee.”

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Juan Carlos Avendaño Cuéllar's curator insight, July 6, 3:57 AM
Good and short review of consequences when multitasking. Highly relevant influences in our nowadays way of living.
Helen Teague's curator insight, July 7, 8:29 AM
"Often what you really need in that moment isn’t caffeine, but just a break." Note: I began to read this post and immediately noticed that I was trying to attend to three other things simultaneously... good points here. Perhaps time to pause and reflect on Switch Overload
Steve Anderson's curator insight, July 7, 10:45 PM
multi tasking and me don't mix
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Dr. Brian Little | TEDTalk - Who Are You, Really? The Puzzle of Personality

What makes you ... you? Psychologists talk about our traits, or defined characteristics that make us who we are. But Brian Little is more interested in the moments when we transcend those traits -- sometimes because our culture demands it of us, and sometimes because we demand it of ourselves. Join Little as he dissects the surprising differences between introverts and extroverts, and explains why your personality may be more malleable than you think.

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Moran Cerf: This scientist can hack your dreams (2016) 480p

What if we could peek inside our brains and see our dreams -- or even shape them? Studying memory-specific brain cells, neuroscientist (and ex-hacker) Moran Cerf found that our sleeping brains retain some of the content we encounter when we're awake and that our dreams can influence our waking actions. Where could this lead us? "Neuroscientists are now giving us a new tool to control our dreams," Cerf says, "a new canvas that flickers to life when we fall asleep."

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Neuroscientists are now giving us a new tool to control our dreams
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Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid - Forbes

Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid - Forbes | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Editors' Note: Following the huge popularity of this post, article source Amy Morin has authored a guest post on exercises to increase mental strength here and Cheryl Conner has interviewed Amy in a Forbes video chat about this article here. For all the time executives spend concerned about physical strength and [...]

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Important for us all to read and take note of. 

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Melinda Robinson's curator insight, March 27, 3:33 AM

Editors' Note: Following the huge popularity of this post, article source Amy Morin has authored a guest post on exercises to increase mental strength here and Cheryl Conner has interviewed Amy in a Forbes video chat about this article here. For all the time executives spend concerned about physical strength and [...]

 

Carol Rine's curator insight, March 28, 8:18 AM

Editors' Note: Following the huge popularity of this post, article source Amy Morin has authored a guest post on exercises to increase mental strength here and Cheryl Conner has interviewed Amy in a Forbes video chat about this article here. For all the time executives spend concerned about physical strength and [...]

 

nathalie chiasson's curator insight, March 30, 1:24 PM

Editors' Note: Following the huge popularity of this post, article source Amy Morin has authored a guest post on exercises to increase mental strength here and Cheryl Conner has interviewed Amy in a Forbes video chat about this article here. For all the time executives spend concerned about physical strength and [...]

 

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Why Attitude Is More Important Than IQ

Why Attitude Is More Important Than IQ | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
New research shows that your attitude is more important to how you do in life than your intellect.
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, March 24, 9:17 AM
W
Without a doubt, EQ is at least as important as IQ. Add a growth mindset and you are nearly unstoppable!
 
Vladimir Kukharenko's curator insight, March 26, 9:53 AM
W
Without a doubt, EQ is at least as important as IQ. Add a growth mindset and you are nearly unstoppable!
 
Carlos Fosca's curator insight, March 26, 10:26 AM
Without a doubt, EQ is at least as important as IQ. Add a growth mindset and you are nearly unstoppable!

 






 


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The Psychology of What Makes a Great Story

The Psychology of What Makes a Great Story | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

"The great writer's gift to a reader is to make him a better writer."

 

“Stories,” Neil Gaiman asserted in his wonderful lecture on what makes stories last, “are genuinely symbiotic organisms that we live with, that allow human beings to advance.” But what is the natural selection of these organisms — what makes the ones that endure fit for survival? What, in other words, makes a great story?


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Mike Donahue's curator insight, January 24, 11:21 AM

This contains some great insights from Bruner and others that can help anyone approach their storytelling challenges in more effective ways.

Chris Carter's curator insight, January 25, 7:51 PM

The monomyth lives!

Andre Piazza's curator insight, January 29, 4:40 PM

#Storytelling

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Autism spectrum, sensory therapy, behavior management | Best Online Courses

Autism spectrum, sensory therapy, behavior management | Best Online Courses | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Learn about autism and how to manage challenging behaviors so we can change the perspectives of others and help people.

The course covers: how our brain experiences the world around us; the characteristics of autism; how autism may impact our behavior; and, strategies for managing common characteristics of autism.


Read more:http://www.bestonlinecourses.info/autism-spectrum-sensory-therapy-behavior-management/#ixzz3xD6xCRwT

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Top 10 TED Talks That Could Change Your Life

Top 10 TED Talks That Could Change Your Life | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

There’s no time like the present to grow or refine ourselves a little bit more, and few resources are as helpful as TED talks. In that vein, here are the top 10 TED talks we’ve featured on Lifehacker or that have been popular on TED.


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How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | #Research

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | #Research | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

— Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.


— Varying the studying environment — by hitting the books in, say, a cafe or garden rather than only hunkering down in the library, or even by listening to different background music — can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.

— A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.

— Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it, according to work by researchers including Henry Roediger III and Jeffrey Karpicke. (Roediger has co-authored his own book, “Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.”)

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/time-the-most-important-factor-neglected-in-education/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 21, 8:40 AM

— Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.


— Varying the studying environment — by hitting the books in, say, a cafe or garden rather than only hunkering down in the library, or even by listening to different background music — can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.

— A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.

— Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it, according to work by researchers including Henry Roediger III and Jeffrey Karpicke. (Roediger has co-authored his own book, “Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.”)

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/time-the-most-important-factor-neglected-in-education/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 

 

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, September 26, 2:49 AM
Leren: Er is geen geijkte weg voor. 
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5 Signs That You've Fallen Into The Trap Of Parent-Child Leadership

5 Signs That You've Fallen Into The Trap Of Parent-Child Leadership | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Today’s managers talk a lot about wanting employees to be more accountable and to act on their own initiative. And yet, those same managers turn around and say to employees: “I have to give you assignments; I have to give you feedback; I have to hold you accountable.” This leaves employees, much like children, left to take feedback, to take assignments and to passively wait to be held accountable.

Today’s top-performing organizations are leaving this style of Parent-Child leadership behind and replacing it with a new model of leadership that treats employees like adults who have unlimited potential and who deserve the opportunity to take control of their own futures. Establishing an Adult-to-Adult dynamic encourages employees to become self-leading and self-sufficient and results in a more motivated, fulfilled and energized workforce. Employees are more aligned with their organization’s vision and more committed to helping the organization achieve that vision.

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David Hain's curator insight, September 12, 4:54 AM

Leadership needs to move to adulthood - but for most of us that will mean unlearning and reducing our parental tendencies!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, September 12, 9:29 AM

Excellent share from Forbes, thanks David Hain.

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What’s Going On Inside the Brain When We Play Music? | #Visual #Arts #Creativity 

What’s Going On Inside the Brain When We Play Music? | #Visual #Arts #Creativity  | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Playing music is the brain’s equivalent of a full body workout,” says educator Anita Collins in a TED-Ed video on how playing music benefits the brain. Playing music requires the visual, auditory, and motor cortices all at once and since fine motor skills require both hemispheres of the brain, the act of playing music may strengthen the bridge between the two sides. In studies comparing playing music to other activities, including other forms of art, playing an instrument is uniquely powerful for the brain.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Music

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 28, 6:36 PM

Playing music is the brain’s equivalent of a full body workout,” says educator Anita Collins in a TED-Ed video on how playing music benefits the brain. Playing music requires the visual, auditory, and motor cortices all at once and since fine motor skills require both hemispheres of the brain, the act of playing music may strengthen the bridge between the two sides. In studies comparing playing music to other activities, including other forms of art, playing an instrument is uniquely powerful for the brain.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Music

 

 

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, August 29, 8:16 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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12 Signs You’re Disrespecting Yourself (and How to Stop) - The Minds Journal

12 Signs You’re Disrespecting Yourself (and How to Stop) - The Minds Journal | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
“How people treat other people is a direct reflection how they feel about themselves” – Paulo Coelho
Every relationship we have, can be viewed as a reflection of the relationship we have with ourselves and setting the tone for the right relationships, lies heavily upon us. By trusting ourselves, listening to our own thoughts, feelings and emotions, we become more authentic and this gives us the wonderful opportunity to become comfortable in our own skin. Yet, when we are not comfortable with who we are, we project onto others, what we cannot accept of ourselves.

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David Hain's curator insight, August 6, 3:36 AM

Some food for thought about personal blind spots...

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 7, 2:41 AM
It might be a good starting point in a self-management project...
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Do You Listen to Music While Working? Here's What It Does to Your Brain (and It's Pretty Awesome) | #Research

Do You Listen to Music While Working? Here's What It Does to Your Brain (and It's Pretty Awesome) | #Research | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
The Chorus to Remember

Music can make a huge difference in your workday. Feel free to crank up the volume if noise has you working like a snail, you've got a case of the Monday's, or you've got something mundane or familiar to do. Ideally, though, make your playlists out of songs you already know, and if your tasks involve any sort of linguistic processing, focus on lyric-free options. Lastly, if you have something to learn, pump up your mood with music before you get started.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?q=music

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 21, 12:54 PM
The Chorus to Remember

Music can make a huge difference in your workday. Feel free to crank up the volume if noise has you working like a snail, you've got a case of the Monday's, or you've got something mundane or familiar to do. Ideally, though, make your playlists out of songs you already know, and if your tasks involve any sort of linguistic processing, focus on lyric-free options. Lastly, if you have something to learn, pump up your mood with music before you get started.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?q=music

 

 

Jerry Busone's curator insight, July 22, 10:45 AM

Who knew...and folks tell me to turn it down :-)

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, July 23, 5:12 AM

Classical or instrumental music enhances mental performance more than music with lyrics. Music can make rote or routine tasks (think folding laundry or filing papers) less boring and more enjoyable. Runners who listen to music go faster. But when you need to give learning and remembering your full attention, silence is golden

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Why you think you're right ? - even if you're wrong

Perspective is everything, especially when it comes to examining your beliefs. Are you a soldier, prone to defending your viewpoint at all costs — or
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16 Habits of Mind

16 Habits of Mind | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

This site aims to provide students and teachers with information and ideas to assist them apply the Habits of Mind. Each of the sixteen habits is presented along with information on when to use each habit and strategies to make the process easy. Each page includes a short video that demonstrates the Habit of Mind and could be used as a starting point for discussion.


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An interesting and useful resource fro developing habits of mind.
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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, May 31, 9:43 AM
Habits of the Mind resource to engage students in a discussion about how to develop each of the 16 Habits of the Mind. Great Resource!
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 5, 7:42 AM
This can be incorporated into a 21 Century metacognitive learning strategy.
Laurie Halt's curator insight, June 5, 2:20 PM

Excellent Resource

 

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Exploding the myth of the scientific vs artistic mind

Exploding the myth of the scientific vs artistic mind | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
It’s a stereotype, but many of us have made the assumption that scientists are a bit rigid and less artistic than others. Artists, on the other hand, are often seen as being less rational than the rest of us. Sometimes described as the left side of the brain versus the right side – or simply logical thinking versus artistic creativity – the two are often seen as polar opposites.

Neuroscience has already shown that everyone uses both sides of the brain when performing any task. And while certain patterns of brain activity have sometimes been linked to artistic or logical thinking, it doesn’t really explain who is good at what – and why. That’s because the exact interplay of nature and nurture is notoriously difficult to tease out. But if we put the brain aside for a while and just focus on documented ability, is there any evidence to support the logic versus art stereotype?

Psychological research has approached this question by distinguishing between two styles of thinking: convergent and divergent. The emphasis in convergent thinking is on analytical and deductive reasoning, such as that measured in IQ tests. Divergent thinking, however, is more spontaneous and free-flowing. It focuses on novelty and is measured by tasks requiring us to generate multiple solutions for a problem. An example may be thinking of new, innovative uses for familiar objects.

Studies conducted during the 1960s suggested that convergent thinkers were more likely to be good at science subjects at school. Divergent thinking was shown to be more common in the arts and humanities.

However, we are increasingly learning that convergent and divergent thinking styles need not be mutually exclusive. In 2011, researchers assessed 116 final-year UK arts and science undergraduates on measures of convergent and divergent thinking and creative problem solving. The study found no difference in ability between the arts and science groups on any of these measures. Another study reported no significant difference in measures of divergent thinking between arts, natural science and social science undergraduates. Both arts and natural sciences students, however, rated themselves as being more creative than social sciences students did.

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Louis Shih's curator insight, April 23, 5:22 AM

感興趣的文章(2)

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 23, 12:50 PM
It is not a binary of left or right, but a continuous conversation between left and right hemispheres.
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Digital Tools Series - TedEd

Digital Tools Series - TedEd | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
TED Ed is a great tool for creating online lessons around videos. It enables you to structure a sequence of interactive activities around the video clip th...

Via Nik Peachey
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Download instructions, teaching suggestions and tips for getting started as well as a tutorial video. Free.

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Aprendiendo juntos's curator insight, April 1, 4:06 AM

Download instructions, teaching suggestions and tips for getting started as well as a tutorial video. Free.

Aprendiendo juntos's curator insight, April 1, 4:24 AM

Download instructions, teaching suggestions and tips for getting started as well as a tutorial video. Free.

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, April 1, 7:41 AM

Download instructions, teaching suggestions and tips for getting started as well as a tutorial video. Free.

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The Onlife Manifesto - Being Human in a Hyperconnected Era

The Onlife Manifesto - Being Human in a Hyperconnected Era | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
By Luciano Floridi in Business Ethics and Computer Science. - Result of “the Onlife Initiative,” a one-year project funded by the European Commission to study the deployment of ICTs and its effects on the human condition - Inspires reflection on the

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nukem777's curator insight, March 4, 6:04 AM
Cue At Last, Etta James
Alex Grech's curator insight, March 4, 7:27 AM
Cue At Last, Etta James
Willem Kuypers's curator insight, March 15, 3:54 PM
Le monde du film Matrix est bien plus proche qu'on ne croit. Le livre donne des pistes de réflexion.
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Selfies, Narcissism and Social Media #Infographic

Selfies, Narcissism and Social Media #Infographic | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Which was more deadly in 2015: shark attacks, or selfies? The answer might surprise you.

Rawhide, a nonprofit organization that assists at-risk youth in Wisconsin, examined social media users’ obsession with selfies and narcissistic tendencies, and its findings included:


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Christine Donalies's curator insight, January 8, 2:37 PM

Of course the answer is selfies. Shark attacks are rare. Maybe use another stat to compare but article is very interesting.

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35 Psychological Tricks To Help You Learn Better - InformED

35 Psychological Tricks To Help You Learn Better - InformED | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentations during your lectures? Urged your students to memorize more in order to remember more?

If the answer is no, you may want to rethink your notions of psychology and its place in the learning environment.

This article lists 35 proven psychological phenomena that affect you and your students every day.

 

Cited From: https://plus.google.com/u/0/101796324413630088793#ixzz3x21FmGR9

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