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9 Signs That Neuroscience Has Entered The Classroom

9 Signs That Neuroscience Has Entered The Classroom | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

While neuroscience hasn’t yet radically changed the way we think about teaching and learning, it is helping to shape educational policies and influencing new ways of implementing technology, improving special education, and streamlining day-to-day interactions between teachers and students. While there is still a long way to go before we truly understand the science of learning and how to use those findings in the real world classroom, it’s important to highlight some of the key ways that neuroscience is changing the classroom of today for the better.


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Psychology Matters
Resources for students and practitioners in the field of psychology. [ Also see: http://xeeme.com/Stewart_Marshall ]
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Gather all your social network addresses together in XeeMe

Gather all your social network addresses together in XeeMe | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

My XeeMe helps you find all my social networks and groups on one page http://xeeme.com/Stewart_Marshall. If you would like your own go to:

http://xeeme.com/?r=GqzAqEE3f0kp

 

It's free. Plus you get a powerful social address book and much more.


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Ivo Nový's comment, November 3, 2012 12:38 AM
Great Idea and great tip for the others. Thank you Stewart, i.
Kamakshi Rajagopal's comment, April 12, 2013 9:45 AM
Hi Stewart, we are conducting an experiment on Scoop.IT pages on education at the Open Universiteit (NL). Would you like to participate? Sign up here: http://bit.ly/14QR9oa
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Drug Reverses Schizophrenia in Mice by Curbing Synaptic Pruning — PsyBlog

Drug Reverses Schizophrenia in Mice by Curbing Synaptic Pruning — PsyBlog | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Experimental chemical restores some lost brain cell function in schizophrenia.

An anticancer compound has reversed the behaviours associated with schizophrenia in mice.

On top of reversing these behaviours, the chemical also restores some lost brain cell function, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine research finds (Hayashi-Takagi et al., 2014).

The compound is a type of PAK inhibitor which has been tested in the treatment of cancer, Fragile X syndrome (a type of mental retardation) and Alzheimer’s disease.

The drug works by targeting a natural process called ‘synaptic pruning’. Synaptic pruning is one of the underlying biological processes thought to be important in the development of schizophrenia.
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, April 14, 9:54 PM

Validates one key neural model of schizophrenia.

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Reading is different online than off, experts say

Reading is different online than off, experts say | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Our brains, neuroscientists warn, are developing new circuits with a big impact on non-digital reading

Claire Handscombe has a commitment problem online. Like a lot of Web surfers, she clicks on links posted on social networks, reads a few sentences, looks for exciting words, and then grows restless, scampering off to the next page she probably won’t commit to.

To cognitive neuroscientists, Handscombe’s experience is the subject of great fascination and growing alarm. Humans, they warn, seem to be developing digital brains with new circuits for skimming through the torrent of information online. This alternative way of reading is competing with traditional deep reading circuitry developed over several millennia.

 
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Violaine Blondin's curator insight, April 9, 5:45 PM

L'impact de l'utilisation d'Internet sur le lecteur.  Hum...  À creuser davantage ...

Anne-Maree Johnson's curator insight, April 9, 6:07 PM

In our moves to have students read all their content from a screen are we doing them any favours? This article introduces the concept of the bi literal brain and argues that students need to develop both linear and non-linear reading strategies.

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Developmental Psychology Masters - Online Masters and PhDs

Developmental Psychology Masters - Online Masters and PhDs | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

There are many career options after taking a developmental psychology masters degree. This page will help you to find out more about studying online and on-campus, and to locate suitable programs for this exciting study of human development.

Graduates with a masters degree in developmental psychology are qualified to work in a specific branch of psychology that involves the study of how humans develop and change during the course of a lifetime. This is not restricted to physical growth and change, but also emotional, cognitive, and social development.

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Antisocial Teenagers Unable to Empathize

Antisocial Teenagers Unable to Empathize | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Antisocial behavior in teens is worsening as their usage of social media, TV and games increases.

 

They become immune to how others feel and cannot sympathize with them. A recent study set out to find a connection between antisocial teenagers and their inability to empathize. Researchers found a link to regions of the brain that are used to process information and control impulses. When these brain activity centers are underdeveloped, it creates an inability to show empathy.

 

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When these brain activity centers are
underdeveloped, it creates an inability
to show empathy.

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MaryFrankIMSD's curator insight, March 13, 6:03 AM

"When these brain activity centers are underdeveloped, it creates an inability to show empathy."

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Grumpy Cat: The psychology behind cat videos

Grumpy Cat: The psychology behind cat videos | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Grumpy Cat is an Internet sensation and this article explains the psychology behind this million-dollar feline success. Share:TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogleEmailMoreDiggRedditTumblrStumbleUpon http://www.grahamjones.co.uk/2014/blog/internet-psychology/grumpy-cat-psychology-cat-videos.html


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Children of older men at greater risk of mental illness, study suggests

Children of older men at greater risk of mental illness, study suggests | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

theguardian.com – Children born to fathers over the age of 45 are at greater risk of developing psychiatric problems and more likely to struggle at school, according to the findings of a large-scale study. The research found that children with older fathers were more often diagnosed with disorders such as autism, psychosis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia and bipolar disorder . They also reported more drug abuse and suicide attempts, researchers said.

 

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Science Confirms: Internet Trolls Really Are Narcissistic, Psychopathic, and Sadistic

Science Confirms: Internet Trolls Really Are Narcissistic, Psychopathic, and Sadistic | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

slate.com – In the past few years, the science of Internet trollology has made some strides. Last year, for instance, we learned that by hurling insults and inciting discord in online comment sections, so-called Internet trolls (who are frequently anonymous) have a polarizing effect on audiences, leading to politicization, rather than deeper understanding of scientific topics. That’s bad, but it’s nothing compared with what a new psychology paper has to say about the personalities of trolls themselves.

 

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Nutritional supplement improves cognitive performance in older adults, study finds

Nutritional supplement improves cognitive performance in older adults, study finds | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

medicalxpress.com – Declines in the underlying brain skills needed to think, remember and learn are normal in aging. In fact, this cognitive decline is a fact of life for most older Americans. Therapies to improve the cognitive health of older adults are critically important for lessening declines in mental performance as people age. While physical activity and cognitive training are among the efforts aimed at preventing or delaying cognitive decline, dietary modifications and supplements have recently generated considerable interest.

Now a University of South Florida (USF) study reports that a formula of nutrients high in antioxidants and other natural components helped boost the speed at which the brains of older adults processed information.

 

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Men are more forgetful than women, study shows

Men are more forgetful than women, study shows | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

medicalnewstoday.com – Men are frequently accused of forgetting birthdays, wedding anniversaries, and even something as simple as taking the trash out. But they have developed this stigma for a reason, a new study suggest – it found that men are more forgetful than women, regardless of their age. The research team, led by Prof. Jostein Holmen of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, published the study findings in the journal BMC Psychology .

 
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Autism: Offering Support to Siblings

Autism: Offering Support to Siblings | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Spotlighting kids on the spectrum and their parents can overshadow siblings. See how to broaden the beam of support.

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Becky B's curator insight, January 27, 1:33 PM

You often see stories taking you further into the life of the child with special needs or the child’s parents, but what about the siblings? Having a child with autism or Asperger syndrome can require more attention, but siblings often face their own struggles that are sometimes overshadowed. 

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Forget About Forgetting: Elderly Know More, Use It Better

Forget About Forgetting: Elderly Know More, Use It Better | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

What happens to our cognitive abilities as we age? If your think our brains go into a steady decline, research reported this week in the Journal Topics in Cognitive Science may make you think again. 

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Want To Become A Better Athlete? Train Your Brain - Huffington Post

Want To Become A Better Athlete? Train Your Brain - Huffington Post | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

“Want To Become A Better Athlete? Train Your Brain Huffington Post But, building the type of brain power that influences athletic performance goes way beyond Sports Psychology 101.”


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How the brain pays attention

How the brain pays attention | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

"Members of Desimone’s lab are now studying how the brain shifts its focus between different types of sensory input, such as vision and hearing. They are also investigating whether it might be possible to train people to better focus their attention by controlling the brain interactions  involved in this process.

“You have to identify the basic neural mechanisms and do basic research studies, which sometimes generate ideas for things that could be of practical benefit,” Desimone says. “It’s too early to say whether this training is even going to work at all, but it’s something that we’re actively pursuing.”


Read more at http://scienceblog.com/71642/how-the-brain-pays-attention/#6CSjmbufhdePSLK1.99


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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, April 15, 1:15 PM

Studies such as Nass et. al.'s "Cognitive Control in Media Multitaskers" have demonstrated on a general level that media multitaskers are actually rapidly task-switching and that the attentional costs of switching focus degrades efficiency in accomplishing individual tasks. But that research is just the beginning. Important to infotention is what is not yet known about how effective attentional training can be.

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Early Signs of Autism in Toddlers, Infants and Babies - free dowload of ebook

Early Signs of Autism in Toddlers, Infants and Babies - free dowload of ebook | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

http://www.amazon.com/Early-Autism-Toddlers-Infants-Babies-ebook/dp/B00I5ETPWM

Since the brain and behaviors are forming at a rapid rate during the early years of life, early intervention can be helpful not only for the child but for parents that are in need of information about autism and sensory functioning.

This book is not intended to replace medical advice but instead is meant to help parents decide if they should seek a professional evaluation along with Leslie's personal story of how she came to get her two children's diagnosis.

April is Autism Awareness month and we wanted to give this book away FREE for 3 days between the 9th and the 11th of April.

It is available as a kindle download at http://www.amazon.com/Early-Autism-Toddlers-Infants-Babies-ebook/dp/B00I5ETPWM
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How we miss subtle visual changes, and why it keeps us sane | neuroscientistnews.com

How we miss subtle visual changes, and why it keeps us sane | neuroscientistnews.com | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Ever notice how Harry Potter's T-shirt changes from a crewneck to a henley shirt in the "Order of the Phoenix," or how in "Pretty Woman," Julia Roberts' croissant inexplicably morphs into a pancake? Don't worry if you missed those continuity bloopers. Vision scientists at UC Berkeley and MIT have discovered an upside to the brain mechanism that can blind us to subtle visual changes in the movies and in the real world.

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BRAIN Initiative Gets a Boost from Obama's Budget Proposal - About Health Degrees

BRAIN Initiative Gets a Boost from Obama's Budget Proposal - About Health Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

President Obama’s 2015 Budget proposes to double federal funding for the BRAIN Initiative from $100 million to $200 million.

The BRAIN Initiative (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies), launched in April 2013, is a collaborative effort between government agencies and industry to revolutionize the understanding of the human brain.

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Six things you need to know about neuroscience to help develop learning

Six things you need to know about neuroscience to help develop learning | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
How do we make learning stick? The CIPD's Ruth Stuart tackles the grey matter to give us an insight into how we might make that happen.

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I Have Autism and am Artistic | Blog | Autism Speaks

I Have Autism and am Artistic | Blog | Autism Speaks | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
() This guest post is from Jeremy Sicile-Kira, an adult on the autism spectrum. His blog is part of an ongoing series on our site called "In Our Own Words: Living on the Spectrum," which highlights the experiences of individuals with autism.

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Marie Schoeman's curator insight, March 8, 7:47 AM

We need to look with new eyes at the immense potential of people living on the spectrum and what they have to contribute to our world!

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How A Big Drug Company Inadvertently Got Americans Hooked On Heroin

How A Big Drug Company Inadvertently Got Americans Hooked On Heroin | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Nearly four out of five people who recently started using heroin used prescription painkillers first, according to a 2013 study from the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality.

“A lot of people who got in trouble with the prescription opiates are switching over to heroin, and they get more for their buck, so to speak,” Bunt said. In his experience, he added, much of the heroin available today is laced with other additives, like additional painkillers -- making it more dangerous.

“Once you inject the heroin that’s available today, you’re at very high risk for fatal overdose,” he said.

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The Neurobiology of Happiness: Pascal Wallisch at TEDxNYU

Pascal Wallisch received his PhD in Psychology from the University of Chicago. He now works as a research scientist and adjunct professor at New York University where he is doing research on autism and the neuroscience of film. He is interested in subjective representations of objective reality and passionate about teaching. His work was recognized several prizes, including the University of Chicago Booth Prize.

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How Many More Tragedies Does It Take Before We Stop Turning Our Backs on Mental Illness?

How Many More Tragedies Does It Take Before We Stop Turning Our Backs on Mental Illness? | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Over 13.5 million adults in the United States suffer from serious mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, major depression and bi-polar disorder. Approximately 20% of American youth between 13 and 18 years of age experience severe mental illness in a given year, 2.6 million people live with schizophrenia and 6.1 million with bi-polar disorder. The problem is worldwide. Then there are the families who often suffer in silence under a heavy cloud of stigma and fear.

Recent research indicates the rate of medication noncompliance for serious mental illness is upwards of 74 percent soon after initiation, especially among patients withschizophrenia. University of Pennsylvania research indicates that if schizophrenia patients prematurely discontinue the first prescription of antipsychotic medication, then the chances are reduced of them sticking to a medication regimen later.

It would be immoral to allow someone in insulin shock to go untreated. Why is it that we insist on letting people who are so sick that they don't know they're sick go untreated? Yet that is what we do in civilized countries around the world. We tell ourselves that if a mentally ill person thinks he is well and doesn't at the moment appear to present a danger to himself or others, no matter how delusional or fractured his or her grasp on reality, it's okay to let conditions get worse. If drugs are involved, especially accompanying symptoms like delusions and medicine noncompliance, research indicates that the chances of violence are significantly increased.

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David Hain's curator insight, February 5, 11:13 PM

A plea to recognise and deal with mental health - very important, please RT.

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Natural plant compound prevents Alzheimer's disease in mice

Natural plant compound prevents Alzheimer's disease in mice | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

medicalxpress.com - (Medical Xpress).  A chemical that’s found in fruits and vegetables from strawberries to cucumbers appears to stop memory loss that accompanies Alzheimer’s disease in mice, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have discovered. In experiments on mice that normally develop Alzheimer’s symptoms less than a year after birth, a daily dose of the compound—a flavonol called fisetin—prevented the progressive memory and learning impairments. The drug, however, did not alter the formation of amyloid plaques in the brain, accumulations of proteins which are commonly blamed for Alzheimer’s disease. The new finding suggests a way to treat Alzheimer’s symptoms independently of targeting amyloid plaques.

 

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Brian Vallotton's curator insight, February 1, 7:58 PM

Let food be thy medicine...

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Toddlers' Aggression Strongly Associated With Genetic Factors

Toddlers' Aggression Strongly Associated With Genetic Factors | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

The development of physical aggression in toddlers is strongly associated with genetic factors and to a lesser degree with the environment, according to a new study led by Eric Lacourse of the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital. Lacourse’s worked with the parents of identical and non-identical twins to evaluate and compare their behavior, environment and genetics.

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Quantum Vibrations in Brain Opens 'Pandora's Box' of Theories of Consciousness

Quantum Vibrations in Brain Opens 'Pandora's Box' of Theories of Consciousness | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

ibtimes.co.uk - The discovery of quantum vibrations inside the brain has opened a “Pandora’s Box” in terms of theories about levels of consciousness. A 20-year-old theory of consciousness published in the Physics of Life Reviews suggested that consciousness came from a deeper level, seemingly supporting spiritual approaches to how the brain works. It was proposed by scientists Sir Roger Penrose and Stuart Hameroff in the mid-1990s and suggested that quantum vibrational computations in the brain microtubules were “orchestrated” (“Orch”) by synaptic inputs and memories stored in microtubules. This was called “objective reduction” (‘OR’).

 
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David Hain's curator insight, January 20, 4:01 AM

Scary and exciting at the same time. The vibes of spirituality?

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Babies Know What Makes a Friend

Babies Know What Makes a Friend | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
news.yahoo.com - Babies as young as 9 months old know that friends usually have similar interests, new research suggests. The new study, published online J
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