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Psychology Matters
Resources for students and practitioners in the field of psychology. [ Also see: http://xeeme.com/Stewart_Marshall ]
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8 Ways Emotionally Intelligent People Deal With Toxic People

8 Ways Emotionally Intelligent People Deal With Toxic People | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Life is stressful enough for most of us. Allowing a toxic individual to ravage your immediate environment can cause havoc in your mental well-being, which can lead to physical challenges.

A bad state of mind not only affects your physical well-being but makes it difficult for you to respond calmly under pressure. Ninety percent of top performers are skilled at managing their emotions, so your ability to perform effectively can be affected if you do not adopt strategies that will allow you to deal with toxic people.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Don Wilson's curator insight, July 13, 12:52 PM

Emotional Intelligence is a great skill to possess. It will truly benefit your life and everyone around you. If you are a student, parent, husband, wife, employee, employer; entrepreneur, teacher, preacher. If you are a man woman, or child, EI, can help you release damaging toxins, left by toxic people (and you too) that add undue stress, tension, and pressure; and free yourself, by improving your mental state, which in turn, increases your health and performance.

 

Other benefits include, but are not limited to; lower blood pressure and hyper-tension, blood sugar levels (diabetes), headaches, back and stomach pain. Paranoia, anxiety, and other related symptoms.

 

I am a student and practitioner of EI; and I have grown and benefited from it greatly, and so can you.

FELICIA PHILLIPS's curator insight, July 13, 4:25 PM

Great Ways to Deal with Toxic People! 

Alicia Newton's curator insight, July 14, 9:07 AM

Great article on avoiding the quicksand of toxic people. I practice many of these techniques. Boundaries; many you will have to love from a distance and it's ok. Being clear that just because people have the right to say what they want doesn't make it true about you; keep it moving. There will be positive & negative people. You get to choose who you will lend your energy to.

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How Friendship Fights Depression

How Friendship Fights Depression | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

A new study published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B suggests that depression doesn’t spread, but a healthy mood does. The researchers looked at data from more than 2,000 high-school students who took a survey of depression symptoms, and who also reported who their friends were, over a period of six to 12 months. Kids who initially scored as clinically depressed did not “infect” their friends, but if they had enough friends who had what the study called a “healthy mood” (in that they didn’t meet the criteria for depression), that doubled their chances of recovering from their depression. And for people who weren’t depressed in the first place, having enough mentally healthy friends halved their chances of developing depression.

 
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5 Body Language Secrets That Will Help You Gain People's Trust

5 Body Language Secrets That Will Help You Gain People's Trust | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Whether it's in the business world or in personal relations, there is one thing that we all need to get along and be successful: trust. We all strive to have people trust us, but the truth is that trust is often hard to build. Luckily, there are some steps you can take to instantly appear more trustworthy. Here are five body language secrets to help you earn people's trust.

 

1. The eyes have it.

 

The first thing you want to remember when building trust is to keep eye contact. Eye contact is one of those things we subconsciously take note of every time we meet a person. Have you ever tried to have a conversation with a person who was constantly shuffling around and looking in different directions? Sporadic eye contact communicates a lack of interest, distraction, and even dishonesty. Whenever you're speaking, be sure to keep good, steady eye contact.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Stewart-Marshall's insight:

We all strive to have people trust us, but the truth is that trust is often hard to build.

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Mike Milazzo's curator insight, August 7, 6:15 PM

We all strive to have people trust us, but the truth is that trust is often hard to build.

Blazenko Drmic's curator insight, August 9, 6:13 AM

We all strive to have people trust us, but the truth is that trust is often hard to build.

Sanda Craina's curator insight, August 10, 1:03 PM

We all strive to have people trust us, but the truth is that trust is often hard to build.

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Autism: From Behavior to Biology

Autism: From Behavior to Biology | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

We are finally moving away from characterizing autism by its observed behaviors and instead on its' core biology. We are finally beginning to learn what is not working correctly in the cells of the brain and body in individuals with autism. The abnormalities are not just confined to the brain, but can be system-wide affecting cells through-out the body. Understanding these abnormalities is pointing to ways to correct them, with many targeted treatments currently being investigated in clinical trials.

 

Understanding the true causes of autism, and discovering truly effective treatments that address the underlying causes that produce it, must become a national priority.

 

 


 
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Nutrition and Wellbeing - About Health Degrees

Nutrition and Wellbeing - About Health Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

This free online course by the University of Aberdeen will help you understand the scientific basis of human nutrition, and current nutrition concepts and controversies.

It draws on world-leading nutrition experts, to demystify the complex and often conflicting messages we hear about diet and health from sources like the media, food industry and scientific community.

 


Read more: http://abouthealthdegrees.com/nutrition-and-wellbeing/#ixzz3gav2MmIG

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Forensic Psychology: A Free Online Course - About Psychology Degrees

Forensic Psychology: A Free Online Course - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Using videos of real witnesses and from cameras that go behind the scenes of a police investigation, this free online course by The Open University UK explores the psychology of eyewitness testimony. You will get the chance to test your own cognitive skills and to see whether your powers of investigation are as good as a crack squad of police officers, as you try to solve a crime using nothing but evidence from eyewitnesses.

 


Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/forensic-psychology/#ixzz3gKXVf9OM

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Psychology course on the attitudes of consumers - About Psychology Degrees

Psychology course on the attitudes of consumers - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

The free ALISON online course “Applied Psychology – Understanding Consumer Attitudes” introduces learners to the importance of understanding consumer attitudes for creating effective marketing strategies.

Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/psychology-course-on-the-attitudes-of-consumers/#ixzz3f7bFFYIH

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Autism and the seventh sense. Spinning and swinging.

Autism and the seventh sense.  Spinning and swinging. | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Is your child afraid of heights? Does he hate escalators? Get sick every time he travels? Or hate swings or any game that puts him off-balance? Or is he totally the opposite? A child who never gets giddy or travel sick? Who really enjoys the rides at the amusement park? Who’s constantly jumping about or hopping around? One who loves swinging as high as he can?

If so it is likely that his vestibular system is not functioning as it should. This complex system is based in the inner ear and provides the brain with information about movement and balance, as well as space and gravity. That information combines with other sensory input – from the eyes, muscles and joints – thereby enabling us to balance and move with ease.


Via Autism Daily Newscast, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Autism Daily Newscast's curator insight, June 30, 4:45 AM

Be sure to read Stella's series on Exploring #Autism. Here is this past week's installment.

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Forensic Psychology Masters - About Psychology Degrees

Forensic Psychology Masters - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

What is forensic psychology? It is the application of psychology in law and law enforcement. For example, it is used in treating mentally ill offenders, providing expert testimony in court, and also in analyzing a criminal’s mind and intent. So to prepare for this work students need to take criminal justice and civil legal courses as well as psychology courses. And this is what a typical forensic psychology masters program covers.

 


Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/forensic-psychology-masters/#ixzz3dX51Zgug

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Psychology: Memory and Cognition - About Psychology Degrees

Psychology: Memory and Cognition - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

This free ALISON learning course approaches the topic from a ‘cognitive’ angle. This perspective likens the mind to an information-processing computer and uses the computer metaphor to examine complex human functions such as visual perception and memory. 



Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/psychology-memory-cognition/#ixzz3dGC9vo1m

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Laura Schulz: The surprisingly logical minds of babies - About Psychology Degrees

Laura Schulz: The surprisingly logical minds of babies - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

How do babies learn so much from so little so quickly? In a fun, experiment-filled talk, cognitive scientist Laura Schulz shows how our young ones make decisions with a surprisingly strong sense of logic, well before they can talk.

 


Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/laura-schulz-the-surprisingly-logical-minds-of-babies/#ixzz3d9kWmf00

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Psychology course on the attitudes of consumers - About Psychology Degrees

Psychology course on the attitudes of consumers - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

The free ALISON online course “Applied Psychology – Understanding Consumer Attitudes” introduces learners to the importance of understanding consumer attitudes for creating effective marketing strategies. For a marketer, consumer attitudes reflect a consistent favorable or unfavorable feeling that a consumer has after evaluating a product/service offering, brand, price etc. By understanding the dynamics behind consumer attitudes marketers can design marketing strategies that positively influence consumers towards the product/service offering, brand, price etc.

 


Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/psychology-course-on-the-attitudes-of-consumers/#ixzz3eW06ryd2

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Changing the Mindset of Education: Every Learner is Unique

Changing the Mindset of Education: Every Learner is Unique | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Stanford researcher Carol Dweck, in studying motivation and perseverance, found that children can be separated into two categories: those with a fixed mindset believe that their successes are a result of their innate talent or smarts; and those with a growth mindset believe that their successes are a result of hard work.

 

Children with a growth mindset see intelligence as something that can be cultivated: the more learning they do, the smarter they become. Those with a fixed mindset see themselves as either smart or not smart and believe that their intelligence cannot grow; no matter how hard they work. When children with fixed mindsets fail, they feel trapped and start thinking that they must not be as talented or smart as their peers.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 9, 12:26 PM
Stanford researcher Carol Dweck, in studying motivation and perseverance, found that children can be separated into two categories: those with a fixed mindset believe that their successes are a result of their innate talent or smarts; and those with a growth mindset believe that their successes are a result of hard work.


Children with a growth mindset see intelligence as something that can be cultivated: the more learning they do, the smarter they become. Those with a fixed mindset see themselves as either smart or not smart and believe that their intelligence cannot grow; no matter how hard they work. When children with fixed mindsets fail, they feel trapped and start thinking that they must not be as talented or smart as their peers.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck


Heather Peretz's curator insight, June 10, 7:53 PM

Love Dweck's work! 

Tetyana Nanayeva's curator insight, June 11, 4:27 PM

Individual Learning Styles

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Blind children can repurpose brain's visual center to process speech — study

Blind children can repurpose brain's visual center to process speech — study | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Parts of the brain once thought to be primarily devoted to processing vision can be recruited by blind children as young as five to process speech, a study has found.

The work could have implications for neurologists’ understanding of “plasticity”, or how the brain adapts to experience.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore used functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, scanners to study brain activity in congenitally blind and sighted children as stories were read to them and music played.

The resulting images showed that lobes of the brain once thought to be primarily devoted to processing vision were being used by blind children to process language, findings that highlight both the brain’s adaptability in childhood and the profound impact of experience.

 
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How Your Personality Determines How You Learn

How Your Personality Determines How You Learn | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

It's virtually impossible to imagine life without learning. We come into the world armed with little more than a bunch of primitive survival instincts, but it’s thanks to our ability to learn that we start adapting to the environment, going from helpless infants into semi-autonomous children before maturing into young adults. Still, when it comes to how we learn, most of us differ considerably at every stage in that process. Now scientists are learning more about that variation and what's behind it.

 

Psychologists have studied learning for over a century, but research in this area has really taken off in the last two decades. Most studies indicate that our personalities largely determine the ways we like to learn. In other words, who we are shapes how we learn. Here's what some of the latest research has uncovered about the most common learning styles and the ways we can learn to our fullest potential.

 


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Stewart-Marshall's insight:

Here's what the latest psychological research says about learning styles and the things that shape them.

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michel verstrepen's curator insight, August 6, 11:52 AM

Here's what the latest psychological research says about learning styles and the things that shape them.

Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, August 6, 12:59 PM

Here's what the latest psychological research says about learning styles and the things that shape them.

vgpascal's curator insight, August 7, 8:18 AM

Here's what the latest psychological research says about learning styles and the things that shape them.

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Not an Introvert, Not an Extrovert? You May Be An Ambivert

Not an Introvert, Not an Extrovert? You May Be An Ambivert | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Ambiverts have introverted and extroverted traits, but neither trait is dominant. As a result, they have more balanced, or nuanced, personalities. They aren’t the folks yammering your ear off. Nor are they the totally silent ones happily ensconced in the corner.

Ambiverts move between being social or being solitary, speaking up or listening carefully with greater ease than either extroverts or introverts. “It is like they’re bilingual,” says Daniel Pink, a business book author and co-host of Crowd Control, a TV series on human behavior, who has studied ambiversion. “They have a wider range of skills and can connect with a wider range of people in the same way someone who speaks English and Spanish can.”

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Connie Butcher's curator insight, August 3, 9:46 AM

Ambiverts have introverted and extroverted traits, but neither trait is dominant. As a result, they have more balanced, or nuanced, personalities. They aren’t the folks yammering your ear off. Nor are they the totally silent ones happily ensconced in the corner.

 

Ambiverts move between being social or being solitary, speaking up or listening carefully with greater ease than either extroverts or introverts. “It is like they’re bilingual,” saysDaniel Pink, a business book author and co-host of Crowd Control, a TV series on human behavior, who has studied ambiversion. “They have a wider range of skills and can connect with a wider range of people in the same way someone who speaks English and Spanish can.”

Franc Viktor Nekrep's curator insight, August 4, 7:13 AM

Ambiverts have introverted and extroverted traits, but neither trait is dominant. As a result, they have more balanced, or nuanced, personalities. They aren’t the folks yammering your ear off. Nor are they the totally silent ones happily ensconced in the corner.

 

Ambiverts move between being social or being solitary, speaking up or listening carefully with greater ease than either extroverts or introverts. “It is like they’re bilingual,” saysDaniel Pink, a business book author and co-host of Crowd Control, a TV series on human behavior, who has studied ambiversion. “They have a wider range of skills and can connect with a wider range of people in the same way someone who speaks English and Spanish can.”

Silvia Nascimento's curator insight, August 6, 9:22 PM

Ambiverts have introverted and extroverted traits, but neither trait is dominant. As a result, they have more balanced, or nuanced, personalities. They aren’t the folks yammering your ear off. Nor are they the totally silent ones happily ensconced in the corner.

 

Ambiverts move between being social or being solitary, speaking up or listening carefully with greater ease than either extroverts or introverts. “It is like they’re bilingual,” saysDaniel Pink, a business book author and co-host of Crowd Control, a TV series on human behavior, who has studied ambiversion. “They have a wider range of skills and can connect with a wider range of people in the same way someone who speaks English and Spanish can.”

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Mothers' chemical intolerance linked to ADHD, autism in children - redOrbit - RedOrbit

Mothers' chemical intolerance linked to ADHD, autism in children - redOrbit - RedOrbit | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
Women with an intolerance to common chemicals are two to three times more likely to give birth to a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder.

Via Penrith Farms, Lon Woodbury
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Alec Soth + Stacey Baker: This is what enduring love looks like - About Psychology Degrees

Alec Soth + Stacey Baker: This is what enduring love looks like - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

In their TED Talk, Stacey Baker and Alec Soth unwound a beautiful through-line of how a couple goes from meeting to creating a life together. (This talk was part of a TED2015 session curated by Pop-Up Magazine: popupmagazine.com or @popupmag on Twitter.)



Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/alec-soth-stacey-baker-this-is-what-enduring-love-looks-like/#ixzz3garmC621

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Johann Hari: Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong - About Psychology Degrees

Johann Hari: Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it
What really causes addiction — to everything from cocaine to smart-phones? And how can we overcome it? Johann Hari has seen our current methods fail firsthand, as he has watched loved ones struggle to manage their addictions. He started to wonder why we treat addicts the way we do — and if there might be …
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How the brain learns to distinguish between what is important and what is not

How the brain learns to distinguish between what is important and what is not | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Traffic lights, neon-lit advertisements, a jungle of road signs. When learning to drive, it is often very difficult to distinguish between important and irrelevant information. How the brain learns the importance of certain images over others is being investigated by Prof. Sonja Hofer at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel.

In a recently published study in Neuron, the neuroscientist and her team show that learning the relevance of images considerably modifies neuronal networks in the brain. These changes might help our brain to process and classify the overload of stimuli in our environment more effectively.


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Steve Silberman: The forgotten history of autism - About Psychology Degrees

Steve Silberman: The forgotten history of autism - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

Steve Silberman points to “a perfect storm of autism awareness” — a pair of doctors with an accepting view, an unexpected pop culture moment and a new clinical test. But to really understand, we have to go back further to an Austrian doctor by the name of Hans Asperger, who published a pioneering paper in 1944. Because it was buried in time, autism has been shrouded in misunderstanding ever since.

This talk was part of a TED2015 session curated by Pop-Up Magazine: popupmagazine.com or @popupmag on Twitter.

 


Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/steve-silberman-the-forgotten-history-of-autism/#ixzz3dss5xbZw

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Psychology: Research Methods - About Psychology Degrees

Psychology: Research Methods - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

This free learning course outlines protocols for experimentation in Psychology including how to structure and conduct experiments, how to interpret results and how to report findings. 


Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/psychology-research-methods/#ixzz3dOFC1zEP

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Autism risk associated with increasing parental age difference - About Psychology Degrees

Autism risk associated with increasing parental age difference - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

It is now fairly well established that there is an association between older paternal age and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There is also evidence for an association between maternal age and ASD. However, it is not clear whether paternal and maternal ages represent independent risk factors, or what the combined effect of paternal and maternal age is.

 


Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/autism-risk-associated-with-increasing-parental-age-difference/#ixzz3d9l3wqcm

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Biology and Behaviour in Psychology - About Psychology Degrees

Biology and Behaviour in Psychology - About Psychology Degrees | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

This ALISON free Psychology course is an excellent complement to face-to-face classes and as a study guide or for those who would like to familiarize themselves with the fundamentals of Psychology.

 


Read more: http://aboutpsychologydegrees.com/biology-behaviour-psychology/#ixzz3cgibEB7n

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New Research Discovers That Depression Is An Allergic Reaction To Inflammation

New Research Discovers That Depression Is An Allergic Reaction To Inflammation | Psychology Matters | Scoop.it

New research is revealing that many cases of depression are caused by an allergic reaction to inflammation.  

 

“Inflammation is our immune system’s natural response to injuries, infections, or foreign compounds. When triggered, the body pumps various cells and proteins to the site through the blood stream, including cytokines, a class of proteins that facilitate intercellular communication.  It also happens that people suffering from depression are loaded with cytokines.”  

 

Inflammation is caused by obesity, high sugar diets, high quantities of trans fats, unhealthy diets in general, and other causes.

 

By treating the inflammatory symptoms of depression — rather than the neurological ones — researchers and doctors are opening up an exciting new dimension in the fight against what has become a global epidemic...


Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, June 9, 10:25 AM

Antinflammatories instead of antidepressants...