Psychology
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J. R. R. Tolkien on Fairy Tales, Language, the Psychology of Fantasy, and Why There’s No Such Thing as Writing “For Children”

J. R. R. Tolkien on Fairy Tales, Language, the Psychology of Fantasy, and Why There’s No Such Thing as Writing “For Children” | Psychology | Scoop.it
“"Creative fantasy, because it is mainly trying to do something else ... may open your hoard and let all the locked things fly away like cage (Cultura: J. R. R.”
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Eye Contact May Not Be Such A Great Way To Pers...

Eye Contact May Not Be Such A Great Way To Pers... | Psychology | Scoop.it
“David DiSalvo recently wrote in Psychology Today about the latest research on the role of eye contact in persuasion.”
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Dream Psychology

Dream Psychology | Psychology | Scoop.it
“Litographs creates art from literature. We design t-shirts and posters from the text of classic books. For each sale, Litographs donates one book to a community in need.”
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Overcoming Fear of Failure

Overcoming Fear of Failure | Psychology | Scoop.it
“ Fear of failure can stop us from succeeding in life and at work. Learn how to overcome your fears so that you can keep moving towards your goals.”
Via Vicky Ellam-Dyson
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It takes courage to face your fears, but feels good when you succeed.
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The Psychology of Selfies - Schaefer Marketing Solutions: We Help Businesses {grow}

The Psychology of Selfies - Schaefer Marketing Solutions: We Help Businesses {grow} | Psychology | Scoop.it
“"Selfies" may be the single-biggest content category on the web -- and growing. What is driving this and what does it mean? (Altijd al willen weten waarom mensen selfies maken?”
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Snigdha Gharami – Negative Thoughts Come from Negative Beliefs

Snigdha Gharami – Negative Thoughts Come from Negative Beliefs | Psychology | Scoop.it
“We all grow within belief systems that our ancestors set in place for us. Naturally we might call them "superstitious." Or they are false beliefs that do not help us grow.”
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Tech professors: Literary blood, brain-drainers change through cultures - LubbockOnline.com

“ Tech professors: Literary blood, brain-drainers change through cultures LubbockOnline.com” Vampires have pretty much always abounded in human culture in one form or another, said Texas Tech professor Erin Collopy. Collopy, Tech’s associate chairwoman of classical and modern languages, teaches “The Vampire in East European and Western Culture” outside her primary Russian courses. The class studies historical roots and societal comparisons of all creatures vampirical. “We trace the development from its slavic folkloric roots to the vampire of literature and film today,” she said. “It’s an old concept, and there’s vampire-like concepts throughout the world.”
Via Mary Daniels Brown
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Those can be some interesting classes
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Read for More Empathy

Read for More Empathy | Psychology | Scoop.it
“ If you want to increase your emotional intelligence, social perception and empathy, scientists now say you should crack open a book. But not just any book. Reading literary fiction – as opposed to popular fiction or serious non-fiction – could help you perform better in job interviews, on dates, or in any one-on-one situation. Those are the results of a new study published in the journalScience, which reports that literary fiction often leaves more to the imagination, encouraging readers to infer emotional nuances and complexity. ” “ In the study, social psychologists at the New School for Social Research in New York City found a broad pool of volunteers through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk service, where people sign up to earn money for completing small jobs. The New York Times noted that volunteers were each paid $2 or $3 to read a few minutes of excerpts from award-winning literary fiction (Don DeLillo, Wendell Berry), while others were given best-sellers like Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl,” a Rosamunde Pilcher romance or a Robert Heinlein science fiction tale. The researchers turned to nonfiction from Smithsonian magazine to round out the selections. ”
Via motel168 lifestyle
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Instead of loosing time doing nothing, spend some time with a book
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