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Psychology and Social Networking
What does social networking tell us about ourselves, what can psychology do to help us understand social networking?
Curated by Aaron Balick
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This Teen Girl Is A Social Network's Worst Nightmare -- And Best Hope

This Teen Girl Is A Social Network's Worst Nightmare -- And Best Hope | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
MILLBURN, N.J. -- Fourteen-year-old Casey Schwartz has ditched more social networking services than most people her parents’ age have joined. Like many of her friends, Casey has a tendency to embrace social media sites, then suddenly drop them.
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When Social Sharing Goes Wrong: Regretting The Facebook Post

There's a key difference between what we regret posting online and what we regret in real life.
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The Conversation Prism by Brian Solis and JESS3

The Conversation Prism by Brian Solis and JESS3 | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
The Conversation Prism is a living representation of Social Media and evolves as services and conversation channels emerge, fuse, and dissipate.
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These Amazing Twitter Metadata Visualizations Will Blow Your Mind

These Amazing Twitter Metadata Visualizations Will Blow Your Mind | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Metadata in Twitter posts lets readers in on your geographic location the language you speak the phone you use and more. They're also a mapmaker's...
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luiy's curator insight, June 20, 2013 5:32 AM

Twitter's full data stream--their “firehose”--is a very detailed thing. Access to raw tweet upon raw tweet lets brands know what customers think and allows first responders to instantly tabulate hurricane damage. The firehose is also full of metadata which discloses personal, geographic, and technological information on Twitter's tens of millions of users. Gnip, one of the best known Twitter firehose resellers, just turned a raw sample of metadata from 280 million tweets into an amazing example of data visualization.

 

The fully scalable and searchable visualizations, created by Eric Fischer and MapBoxfor Gnip, uses metadata from 280 million tweets collected from a data sample going back to 2011. Gnip's Ian Cairns told Fast Company in a phone conversation the sample was pruned to remove multiple tweets from the same geographic location in order to emphasize geographic distribution rather than tweet frequency. Gnip and MapBox only selected tweets with location metadata attached, which ranged from 2% to 4% of the total tweets in Twitter's firehose. When posting messages to Twitter, users can choose whether to embed geographic location metadata. According to Cairns, the percentage of tweets with location metadata attached is decreasing over time.

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60 Mind-Blowing and Tweetable Social Media Stats

60 Mind-Blowing and Tweetable Social Media Stats | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Discover 60 of the freshest stats and facts on social media strategy, including Twitter integration for easy sharing!
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Katie Maguire's curator insight, July 3, 2013 4:56 PM

These were some crazy statistics. Even though it seems like everyone is connected, it's important for me to remember that there are people who will go hungry, die of war, and won't see the internet because of their government.

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Online disinhibition and the psychology of trolling (Wired UK)

Online disinhibition and the psychology of trolling (Wired UK) | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Are people genuinely more aggressive, rude and unpleasant online, and if so, why? And what can we do to counter that, and make the internet a more tolerant place?
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Conscious computing: how to take control of your life online

Conscious computing: how to take control of your life online | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Twitter, Facebook, Google… we know the internet is driving us to distraction. But could sitting at your computer actually calm you down? Oliver Burkeman investigates the slow web movement
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luiy's curator insight, May 11, 2013 7:34 AM

In March, I spent a week trying to live as faithfully as possible in accordance with the philosophy of calming (or conscious or contemplative) computing. At home, I stopped using my Nexus smartphone as a timepiece – I wore a watch instead – to prevent the otherwise inevitable slide from checking the time, or silencing the alarm, into checking my email, my Twitter feed or Wikipedia's List Of Unusual Deaths. After a couple of days, I disabled the Gmail and Twitter apps completely, and stored my phone in my bag while I worked, frequently forgetting it for hours at a time. At work, I shut off the internet in 90-minute slabs using Mac Freedom, the "internet blocking productivity software" championed by such writerly big shots as Zadie Smith and the late Nora Ephron. ("Freedom enforces freedom," its website explains chillingly.) Most mornings, I also managed 10 minutes with ReWire, a concentration-enhancing meditation app for the iPad that plays songs from your music library in short bursts, interrupted by silence; your job is to press a button as fast as you can each time you notice the music has stopped. I also tried to check my email no more than three times a day, and at fixed points: 9.30am, 1.30pm and 5pm.

 

Disconcerting things began to happen. I'm embarrassed to report that I found myself doing what's referred to, in Pang's book, as "paper-tweeting": scribbling supposedly witty wisecracks in a notebook as a substitute for the urge to share them online. (At least I'd never had a problem with "sleep texting", which, at least according to a few dubious media reports, is now a thing among serious smartphone addicts.) I had a few minor attacks of phantom mobile phone vibrations, aka "ringxiety", which research suggests afflicts at least 70% of us. By far the biggest obstacle to my experiment was the fact that the web and email are simultaneously sources of distraction and a vital tool: it's no use blocking the internet to work when you need the internet for work. Still, the overall result was more calmness and a clear sense that I'd gained purchase on my own mind: I was using it more than it was using me. I could jump online to look something up and then – this is the crucial bit – jump off again. After a few 90-minute stretches of weblessness, for example, I found myself not itching to get back online, but bored by the prospect. I started engaging in highly atypical behaviours, such as going for a walk, instead.

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What’s your sign? Blackberry. What’s yours? – The psychology of personality and smartphone choice |

What’s your sign? Blackberry. What’s yours? – The psychology of personality and smartphone choice | | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
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Facebook folly: what if social networks don't understand estrangement needs?

Facebook folly: what if social networks don't understand estrangement needs? | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Simple algorithms that make 'friend' suggestions don't cater for huge complexities found in human relationships, especially within families, finds Becca Bland
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Facebook users unwittingly revealing intimate secrets, study finds

Facebook users unwittingly revealing intimate secrets, study finds | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Personal information including sexuality and drug use can be correctly inferred from public 'like' updates, according to study. By Josh Halliday
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Is it 1984 with Brave New World’s face? Today’s technology and its utopian/dystopian potentials |

Is it 1984 with Brave New World’s face? Today’s technology and its utopian/dystopian potentials | | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
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The Real Psychological Motivation Behind Social Networking |

The Real Psychological Motivation Behind Social Networking | | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Aaron Balick's insight:

Feature article in TILT magazine

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Joel Cheuoua's curator insight, February 2, 2013 6:13 PM

If you've ever felt like beign in the midst of a popularity contest on social media, here's the why ...

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Why a Facebook Advocate is Leaving Facebook

Why a Facebook Advocate is Leaving Facebook | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
I write this from a patio in the Dominican Republic. The street here is an obstacle course. You walk out to buy coffee, but you're attacked by one, five, eight people offering you things. What they...
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The Digital Economy of Recognition: the psychology of the socially networked self |

The Digital Economy of Recognition: the psychology of the socially networked self | | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
The result of social networking, human psychology, and capitalism all sharing the same bed has produced (though social shaping) a socially networked world in which we are unconsciously drawn to branding ourselves.
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The anti-social network: When Twitter goes wrong, it goes very, very wrong

The anti-social network: When Twitter goes wrong, it goes very, very wrong | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Twitter can make you a star, but it can also ruin your life. Like the Force in the Star Wars universe, it has both a light side and a dark side. And when Twitter goes bad, it can go very bad indeed.
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How Not to Be Alone

How Not to Be Alone | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Technology may make it easier to communicate electronically, but more difficult to do so emotionally.
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Smartphone Ownership 2013 | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

56% of American adults now own a smartphone of some kind; Android and iPhone owners account for half of the cell phone user population. Higher income adults and those under age 35 lead the way when it comes to smartphone ownership.
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Does meme count as culture?

Does meme count as culture? | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
The ubiquitous internet meme comes in many forms -- from iterations on top of iterations of a viral video to a random picture of a cute animals with an ironic white Impact caption.
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Mapping hate speech: homophobia and racism on twitter

Mapping hate speech: homophobia and racism on twitter | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Here on the Guardian's data team, we tend to have a healthy dose of skepticism about the accuracy of semantic analysis.
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How Facebook Takes Your Emotional Temperature | In Their Own Words | Big Think

How Facebook Takes Your Emotional Temperature | In Their Own Words | Big Think | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
If you actually look at Facebook's effect on our brains, it’s like taking a drug. The problem, according to Jonathan Harris, is that with software that makes you come back over and over again, you become the product.
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luiy's curator insight, April 20, 2013 6:58 AM

So it’s one of the cautionary notes that we've shared in this Human Face of Big Data project, which is about technology that we use for good or bad. Some people think that Facebook is fantastic, other people are very worried about it.  I find Facebook absolutely fascinating because I don’t think there’s ever been any one source that had so much information about each of us -- who we talk to, who our friends are, what books we read, what we're buying, what movies we saw, what our travel is.

 
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Teens and Technology 2013 | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

Smartphone adoption among teens has increased substantially and mobile access to the internet is pervasive. One in four teens are “cell-mostly” internet users, who say they mostly go online using their phone.
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Digital revolution: time to question our love affair with new tech

Digital revolution: time to question our love affair with new tech | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Observer editorial: Unless we examine our relationship with computing, its advances could lead to trouble for mankind
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Most Facebook Users Have Taken a Break From the Site, Study Finds

Most Facebook Users Have Taken a Break From the Site, Study Finds | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
A new study from Pew Internet, a research center, found that the majority of Facebook users took voluntary breaks from the site, citing boredom or concerns about privacy.
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How Twitter Gets In The Way Of Knowledge

How Twitter Gets In The Way Of Knowledge | Psychology and Social Networking | Scoop.it
Twitter has increasingly restricted access to the largest organized database of modern language in the world, despite its immense research value. It's a tragedy.
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