Psychology and Health
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The Link Between Clutter and Depression

The Link Between Clutter and Depression | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Dishes in the sink, toys throughout the house, stuff covering every flat surface; this clutter not only makes our homes look bad, it makes us feel bad, too. At least that’s what researchers at UCLA’s Center on Everyday Lives and Families (CELF) discovered when they explored in real time the relationship between 32 California families and the thousands of objects in their homes. The resulting book, Life at Home in The Twenty-First Century, is a rare look at how middle-class Americans use the space in their homes and interact with the things they accumulate over a lifetime. Our over-worked closets are overflowing with things we rarely touch. It turns out that clutter has a profound affect on our mood and self-esteem.


Via Dr. Amy Fuller
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A disorganized home reflects a disorganized mind!

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Where are the world's happiest countries?

Where are the world's happiest countries? | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Norwegians have more reason than ever to celebrate the International Day of Happiness. After ranking fourth for the last two years, Norway jumped three spots and displaced three-time winner Denmark to take the title of "world's happiest country" for the first time.

 

New report released: http://worldhappiness.report/

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Happiness is more than GDP. But is it also more than life satisfaction?

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Study: Improving your sleep quality is as beneficial to health and happiness as winning the lottery

Study: Improving your sleep quality is as beneficial to health and happiness as winning the lottery | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Analysing the sleep patterns of more than 30,500 people in the UK across four years, researchers finds that improving your sleep quality leads to levels of mental and physical health comparable to those of somebody who’s won a jackpot of around £200,000.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A good night's sleep is worth £200,000!

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"Super Agers" Have Brains That Look Young

"Super Agers" Have Brains That Look Young | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
As we get older, we start to think a little bit more slowly, we are less able to multitask and our ability to remember things gets a little wobblier. This cognitive transformation is linked to a steady, widespread thinning of the cortex, the brain's outermost layer. Yet the change is not inevitable. So-called super agers retain their good memory and thicker cortex as they age, a recent study suggests.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Older adults who perform like young people on tests of memory have a shrink-resistant cortex.

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Dawn Hoenie's curator insight, March 16, 7:02 AM

As we get older, we start to think a little bit more slowly, we are less able to multitask and our ability to remember things gets a little wobblier. This cognitive transformation is linked to a steady, widespread thinning of the cortex, the brain's outermost layer. Yet the change is not inevitable. So-called super agers retain their good memory and thicker cortex as they age, a recent study suggests.

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Tuning brain regions like radios for better memory

Tuning brain regions like radios for better memory | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Our brains are basically electrochemical computers, so using electricity to manipulate their function is a well-proven technique. From deep-brain stimulation that controls the symptoms of depression to zapping our grey matter to improve our vision, electrical current applied to our brains holds a lot of promise.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

New research at Imperial College London has shown that a low-voltage stream of electricity can be used to bring different brain regions in sync with each other, leading to improved memory ability and the hope of treating neurological disorders.

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Having children may increase lifespan

Having children may increase lifespan | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
People who have children may live up to 2 years longer than those who do not have children, and it may be down to increased social support in old age.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Swedish study finds men with children live 2 years longer than childless men, and women with children live 1.5 years longer than childless women.

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Yoga Helps Reduce Symptoms of Depression, Study Finds

Yoga Helps Reduce Symptoms of Depression, Study Finds | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of the most common mental health disorders in the United States. According to statistics from the National Institute of Mental Health (link is external) (NIMH), in 2015, an estimated 16.1 million adults aged 18 or older in the U.S. had experienced at least one major depressive episode in the past year. This number represented 6.7 percent of the adult population. Globally, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that major depressive disorder carries the heaviest burden of disability among all mental and behavioral disorders. Unfortunately, almost half of all individuals who use antidepressant medications to treat MDD do not achieve full remission of their depressive symptoms. But, there is a good news. The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (link is external) (NCCIH) has been funding research to identify nonpharmacological interventions that can help reduce the symptoms of depression, and the latest research findings offer promise.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Depressed patients who participate in yoga and deep breathing classes at least twice weekly experience a significant reduction in depressive symptoms.

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Danielle Rivera's curator insight, March 6, 5:04 PM
In this article it states that yoga helps with depression and I believe this to be true because I have practiced this. Around my junior year of high school I was suffering really bad with depression but my mom was not willing to put me on any medication to help solve the solution so instead they had given me options with what I wanted to do and yoga was one of my options. So i began to do yoga, I went to a couple studios and tried it out at home and it helped. Although it wasn't an overnight shift it helped without the use of a prescript drug which in the end Im thankful for. I still keep some of these practices and meditate especially if i ever feel out of place.
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Friends’ pictures on social media have biggest impact on body image

Friends’ pictures on social media have biggest impact on body image | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Women are more likely to compare themselves with their peers than with celebrities
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

The negative impact that thin models and airbrushed adverts have on young women has been a source of concern for decades, but increasing attention is being paid to the role of social media. Research finds that women are more likely to compare their appearance with that of their peers’ images on social media than they are with celebrities on TV, adverts or other forms of traditional media. When they make an unfavourable comparison with the other woman they are looking at, the impact is more pronounced when the image is on social media.

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Air pollution exposure promotes pathological brain aging

Air pollution exposure promotes pathological brain aging | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive brain disease that eventually strips sufferers of their ability to remember, communicate and live independently. By 2050, it is projected to affect nearly 14 million Americans and their families, with an economic cost of one trillion dollars – more than the estimated combined total for treating heart disease and cancer. Of the leading causes of death in America, Alzheimer’s disease is the only one that we currently cannot prevent, cure or even stall. Our latest research seeks to change this situation by providing a better understanding of the environmental causes and mechanisms behind the disease. Our findings lead us to conclude that outdoor air pollution, in the form of tiny particles released from power plants and automobiles that seep into our lungs and blood, could nearly double the dementia risk in older women. If our results are applicable to the general population, fine particulate pollution in the ambient air may be responsible for about one out of every five cases of dementia. This study, the first to combine human epidemiologic investigation with animal experiments, adds to a growing body of research from around the world that links air pollution to dementia. It also provides the first scientific evidence that a critical Alzheimer’s risk gene, APOE4, interacts with air particles to accelerate brain aging.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Women exposed to higher levels of air pollution have faster rates of cognitive decline and a higher risk of developing dementia.

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Sleep and exercise could be as powerful as any 'smart drug'

Sleep and exercise could be as powerful as any 'smart drug' | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
“Although meta-analyses allowing a quantitative comparison of effectiveness across techniques are lacking to date, we can conclude that PCE is not more effective than NPCE,” researchers Lucius Caviola and Nadira Faber write.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

You don’t have to take a pill to boost your brain power. A meta-analysis finds that non-pharmacological forms of cognitive enhancement like sleep, exercise, and brain-training appear to do as much to improve cognition as pharmacological ones like modafinil, methylphenidate, and caffeine.

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How Facebook actually isolates us

How Facebook actually isolates us | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Research shows online communities reinforce old ideas, exclude outside ones.

 

See also:

Zuckerberg admits social media is broken, needs to be more inclusive and informed https://www.siliconrepublic.comcompanies/zuckerberg-facebook

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Study claims that social media actually isolates us, creating and facilitating confirmation biases and echo chambers where old -- and sometimes erroneous -- information is just regurgitated over and over again.

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Heading footballs causes same brain damage as boxing - major new study

Heading footballs causes same brain damage as boxing - major new study | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Scientists at University College London say years of heading the ball can cause the same type of progressive damage as suffered by heavyweight prizefighters. They have called for “urgent” widescale research to establish whether repeated sub-concussive head impacts caused by heading may also be prompting dementia in the amateur game.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Professional football is as risky as boxing in causing brain damage that can lead to dementia and early death, a major new investigation warns.

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Mens’ Chronic Work Stress May Increase Risk of Some Cancers

Mens’ Chronic Work Stress May Increase Risk of Some Cancers | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
New Canadian research suggests that for men, prolonged exposure to work-related stress is linked to an increased likelihood of particular types of cancer.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Work-related stress over the course of a man’s career associated with increased risk of lung, colon, rectal, and stomach cancer and non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

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Longest ever personality study finds no correlation between measures taken at age 14 and age 77

Longest ever personality study finds no correlation between measures taken at age 14 and age 77 | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Imagine you’ve reached the fine age of 77 and you hear news of a school reunion. You’re going to have the chance to meet up with several of your former classmates who you haven’t seen since you were fourteen-years-old. They’ll look a lot different, of course, but what about their personality? Will they be broadly be the same as they were back then? Past research that’s looked at trait changes from adolescence to mid-life has shown there tends to be a moderate amount of stability, so too research that’s looked at changes from mid-life into old age. Put these two sets of data together and you might expect to see at least some personality stability across an entire lifespan. Your classmates probably won’t have changed completely. Yet that’s not what a recent open-access study in Psychology and Aging has found: the first – to the authors’ knowledge – to measure personality in the same people in their adolescence and then again in old age. By covering a period of 63 years, this in a sense is the longest ever personality study. But contrary to what we might expect based on previous findings, Matthew Harris and his colleagues at the University of Edinburgh failed to find any correlation between their participants’ personality scores at age 14 and their scores on the same items at the age of 77. “Personality in older age may be quite different from personality in childhood,” they said.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

The longer the interval between two assessments of personality, the weaker the relationship between the two. New results suggest that when the interval is increased to as much as 63 years, there is hardly any relationship at all.

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The Countries With the Happiest Employees (Infographic)

The Countries With the Happiest Employees (Infographic) | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
From Denmark to Canada, countries around the world differ in what they offer employees. And some countries seem to have it a little better than others.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Scoring a 7.5 out of 10 on the employee happiness meter, Denmark takes the cake for one of the best countries to work in.

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Eating fruits and vegetables may lower women's stress risk

Eating fruits and vegetables may lower women's stress risk | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
New research finds that eating five to servings of fruits and vegetables daily may lower women's risk of stress by more than a fifth.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Simply including more fruits and vegetables in the diet may help to lower the risk of stress, particularly for women.

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Skinny jeans and parka jackets are fuelling back pain in women, experts say 

Skinny jeans and parka jackets are fuelling back pain in women, experts say  | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

The British Chiropractic Association said three quarters of women had suffered from back pain, with fashion choices adding to problems. They singled out skinny jeans, large fluffy hoods, cross body bags and statement necklaces as causing particular strain.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Any item of clothing that restricts movement, or which leads you to stand or walk unnaturally, can have a negative impact on your posture, back or neck. Restrictive clothing can lead to a loss of 'bounce' in your stride and the natural shock-absorbing qualities in your walk, causing pressure in your joints.

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Childhood bullying may lead to increased chronic disease risk in adulthood

Childhood bullying may lead to increased chronic disease risk in adulthood | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Being bullied during childhood might have lifelong health effects related to chronic stress exposure - including an increased risk for heart disease and diabetes in adulthood, according to a research review in the March/April issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. Recent advances in understanding of the negative health effects of chronic stress highlight a pressing need to clarify the longer-term health implications of childhood bullying, according to the review by Susannah J. Tye, PhD, of the Mayo Clinic and colleagues. "Bullying, as a form of chronic social stress, may have significant health consequences if not addressed early," Dr. Tye comments. "We encourage child health professionals to assess both the mental and physical health effects of bullying."

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Addressing bullying victimization should be a "standard component" of clinical care for children - at the primary care doctor's office as well as in mental health care. Asking about bullying represents a practical first step towards intervening to prevent traumatic exposure and reduce risk for further psychiatric and related morbidities.

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'Hater’ Is A Dating App That Connects You Based On What You Both Hate

'Hater’ Is A Dating App That Connects You Based On What You Both Hate | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
A new dating app called "Hater" matches people based on their mutual dislikes, and it might be the most brilliant app of all time. You had me at hate.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Similarity is usually a predictor of a relationship being succesful. Now, there's an app to help you find your soulmate - based on what you deeply, truly, and passionately hate above all things. It's brilliant!

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QIU NINGYU's comment, March 7, 6:47 AM
I thought this is a quite creative app that really can create some topic to take about between strangers. These people, even if they cannot be couples, they can easily become friends. In my opinion, the fastest way to develop some form of interest in each other is true is through common hatred. It is noticeable that when we are having conversation on the things we hate, especially with people who have the same kind of feelings, we tend to get very excited and we will have many things to talk about. Moreover, when a couple both hate the same thing, it will also make them to know each other better, and avoid steeping over the base line of their partner.
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Social media users more likely to feel isolated, study finds

Social media users more likely to feel isolated, study finds | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
A new study from the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania - published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine - investigates the effect of social media use on feelings of social isolation.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

People who use social media for more than 2 hours per day twice as likely to feel socially isolated compared to <30 min/day users.

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Dawn Hoenie's curator insight, March 16, 7:02 AM

A new study from the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania - published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine - investigates the effect of social media use on feelings of social isolation. 

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School Bullying Linked to Lower Academic Achievement, Research Finds

School Bullying Linked to Lower Academic Achievement, Research Finds | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Most studies on bullying have tracked children for relatively short periods of time and focused on psychological effects, such as anxiety or depression. This is the first long-term study to track children for more than a decade from kindergarten through high school and analyze connections between bullying and academic achievement.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Chronic bullying is consistently related to lower academic achievement and less engagement in school throughout school years.

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An app to help blind people to 'see'

An app to help blind people to 'see' | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Thousands of people are lending their eyes to those who need them.

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Child obesity '35-40 percent' inherited from parents

Child obesity '35-40 percent' inherited from parents | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Around 35-40 percent of a child's BMI -- how fat or thin they are -- is inherited from their parents, a new study has found. For the most obese children, the proportion rises to 55-60 per cent. 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Study suggests more than half of the tendency towards obesity is determined by genetics and family environment.

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Teens Who Get Mental Health Help Less Likely to Suffer Depression Later

Teens Who Get Mental Health Help Less Likely to Suffer Depression Later | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Young people with mental health problems who have contact with mental health services are significantly less likely to suffer from clinical depression later in their adolescence, according to new research.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Study finds odds of reporting clinical depression more than seven times higher in teens without contact to mental health services than in those with.

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Thanks for Reading This—Now Log Off of Facebook

Thanks for Reading This—Now Log Off of Facebook | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
New research finds a link between use of the social network and lower levels of well-being.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A new, rigorously designed study has just been published, and it concludes spending time with your digital “friends” is not conducive to contentment. While real-world social networks are positively associated with overall well-being, the use of Facebook appears to be just the opposite.

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The Vitamin That Stops People Getting Horrific Headaches

The Vitamin That Stops People Getting Horrific Headaches | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Largest study to date builds evidence that vitamin deficiency is linked to chronic headaches.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Before you chuck down that aspirin, check first if you are low on vitamin D.

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