Psychology, Health and Happiness
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Ways Stress Affects Your Body And Your Health

Ways Stress Affects Your Body And Your Health | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
Your body just recognizes stress as strain. And whether it's from an emotional, mental, or physical source, it cannot tell the difference and will act accordingly.

Via American Institute Health Care Professionals
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Deal with it before its too late. Learn what it does to your health and how to beat it.

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American Institute Health Care Professionals's curator insight, September 3, 2013 12:07 PM

#waysstressaffects #howstresscanhurtyou #hazardsofstress #stresscancause #sourceofstress

Looking for information on how stress can hurt you?   Here is an excellent infograph on the ways stress affects our physical body.    As you can see the hazards of stress are more than just a bad day and a headache.  


Stress can cause chronic fatigue, panic disorders, hypertension,irritable bowel syndrome, weight gain, muscle tension, etc to name a few.   It does not matter where your stress is coming from either.    Any source of stress can cause these effects on your body.   



Psychology, Health and Happiness
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16-Year-Old Georgia Teen Violently Beaten And Berated By Mother On Facebook Live Video Stream

16-Year-Old Georgia Teen Violently Beaten And Berated By Mother On Facebook Live Video Stream | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

Warning: The attached video is extremely violent and contains language that may upset some readers. Please proceed with caution before viewing. Like most teenagers, 16-year-old Nia Green is guilty for sharing a bit too much information about herself on social media. Unfortunately, one recent moment of her life has recently garnered a massive amount of attention, and has gone viral for one of the worst reasons possible. According to Tea Served Cold, it all began when the Georgia resident posted a shot of her boyfriend and herself, wearing nothing but a towel, to her Facebook page at some time on Saturday. Eventually, word of the salacious snap made its way to Nia’s mother, Shanavia Miller, who, instead of just scolding or punishing her child, took things several steps too far by grabbing Green’s phone, accessing Nia’s Facebook page, and starting a Facebook live video stream. Then, with more than 4,000 witnesses having a clear view of her actions, Miller began beating Nia with a piece of plywood and her bare hands.

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Behold, physical and emotional child abuse in action!

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Neuroscientists say multitasking literally drains the energy reserves of your brain

Neuroscientists say multitasking literally drains the energy reserves of your brain | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
Does your morning routine consist of checking emails, browsing Facebook, downing coffee, heading to the train while Googling one last idea, checking notifications, more coffee, and going through your work email? The myriad activities crammed into your morning, and the constant switching between them, is likely making you very tired.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Drop the multitasking! Less is more.

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Best-Paid CEOs Run Some of Worst-Performing Companies

Best-Paid CEOs Run Some of Worst-Performing Companies | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
The best-paid CEOs tend to run some of the worst-performing companies and vice versa—even when pay and performance are measured over the course of many years, according to a new study.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

The worse you perform, the more you earn! We better be careful how we explain this to our children... 

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How stress affects your heart, skin, memory and fat deposits

How stress affects your heart, skin, memory and fat deposits | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

Sweaty palms, racing heart and queasy feelings in times of crisis are a primitive, natural reaction known as the stress response and, in small doses, a healthy thing. They give us the get-up-and-go to fight an impending challenge – we did, after all, evolve to fight or flee predators in the wild. But when stress never relents, such as an overwhelming job or financial pressures, it can lead to a catalogue of health problems, from obesity and acne to heart disease.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Cortisol and other stress hormones are important because they prime our bodies to react to threat. But when our cortisol is too high for too long, it can lead to physical and mental health problems in many areas of our bodies. Research has found that high stress levels can cause cancer to spread up to six times faster. 

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Couples study ties anger to heart problems, stonewalling to back pain: Study suggests how you argue predicts health problems later in life

Couples study ties anger to heart problems, stonewalling to back pain: Study suggests how you argue predicts health problems later in life | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

New research from the University of California, Berkeley, and Northwestern University, based on how couples behave during conflicts, suggests outbursts of anger predict cardiovascular problems. Conversely, shutting down emotionally or "stonewalling" during conflict raises the risk of musculoskeletal ailments such as a bad back or stiff muscles. "Our findings reveal a new level of precision in how emotions are linked to health, and how our behaviors over time can predict the development of negative health outcomes," said UC Berkeley psychologist Robert Levenson, senior author of the study.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

20 years of data suggest that outbursts of anger between spouses predict cardiovascular problems. Conversely, shutting down emotionally or "stonewalling" during conflict raises the risk of musculoskeletal ailments such as a bad back or stiff muscles.

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The science is in: Exercise isn’t the best way to lose weight

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Why working out is great for health, but not for weight loss.

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The portable centrifuge that lets men count sperm at home

The portable centrifuge that lets men count sperm at home | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

According to a series of studies over the last few years, global sperm count is falling, and fertility problems affect one in eight couples. But instead of having to visit the doctor to check for fertility issues, men might soon be able to do this from the comfort of their own homes.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

The ultimate health tracker for men. A portable fertility test enabling men to test the quality of their sperm will soon be on sale in the US, after recently receiving FDA.

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Children’s brains develop faster with music training

Children’s brains develop faster with music training | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

The Brain and Creativity Institute (BCI) at USC began the five-year study in 2012 in partnership with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Association and the Heart of Los Angeles (HOLA) to examine the impact of music instruction on children’s social, emotional and cognitive development. These initial study results, published recently in the journal Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, provide evidence of the benefits of music education at a time when many schools around the nation have either eliminated or reduced music and arts programs. The study shows music instruction speeds up the maturation of the auditory pathway in the brain and increases its efficiency.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Music instruction accelerates brain development in young children, particularly in the areas of the brain responsible for processing sound, language development, speech perception and reading skills.

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Inside Silicon Valley’s Robot Pizzeria

Inside Silicon Valley’s Robot Pizzeria | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

In the back kitchen of Mountain View's newest pizzeria, Marta works tirelessly, spreading marinara sauce on uncooked pies. She doesn’t complain, takes no breaks, and has never needed a sick day. She works for free. Marta is one of two robots working at Zume Pizza, a secretive food delivery startup trying to make a more profitable pizza through machines. It's also created special delivery trucks that will finish cooking pizzas during the journey to hungry customers if approved by the Santa Clara County Department of Environmental Health. Right now Zume is only feeding people in Mountain View, California, but it has ambitions to dominate the $9.7 billion pizza delivery industry.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

This may be the final blow to the Italian economy!

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How Make-Up Makes Men Admire but Other Women Jealous

How Make-Up Makes Men Admire but Other Women Jealous | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
A psychology study by the University of Stirling has found that men think women with make-up on are more 'prestigious', while women think women who wear make-up are more 'dominant'.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Damned if you do, damned if you don't..

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Why Forgiveness Is Great for Your Health, According to Science

Why Forgiveness Is Great for Your Health, According to Science | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

It appears that there are more benefits to "letting it go" than you might realize. All of us get hurt from time to time--but when we forgive, we often feel better about ourselves. As it turns out, recent scientific research indicates forgiveness improves our physical health as well. In a new study in the Journal of Health Psychology, researchers analyzed the mental and physical health of 148 young adults. As one might expect, a correlation was found between high stress levels and more health problems. But the study also indicated that in cases where people showed forgiveness--of both themselves and others--the connection between stress and mental illness practically disappeared.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Forgive, and ye shall be forgiven (Luke 6:37).

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Scientists have invented a mind-reading machine that visualises your thoughts

Scientists have invented a mind-reading machine that visualises your thoughts | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
If you think your mind is the only safe place left for all your secrets, think again, because scientists are making real steps towards reading your thoughts and putting them on a screen for everyone to see. 
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Scientists have built a system that can read people’s thoughts via brain scans, and reconstruct the faces they were visualising in their heads.

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Scientists just cut 20% of the fat out of chocolate using electrical fields

Scientists just cut 20% of the fat out of chocolate using electrical fields | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

The discovery ties into a field of research called electrorheology (ER), and involves the study of how matter can be deformed and manipulated by electricity. The physicists involved in the research, from Temple University in Philadelphia, found that by applying an electric field in the same direction as the flow of the liquid chocolate, they could reduce its viscosity in that direction – and only that direction. By doing this, the team estimates that the fat content of chocolate can be cut from around 40-60 percent to something like 32-58 percent, though they're still figuring out the exact nutritional figures. What happens during the new process is that the cocoa particles get aggregated into small chains as the electric field is applied, which means they're more highly organised inside the sticky chocolate, and flow in a certain direction more readily.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Scientists have figured out a way to keep chocolate in liquid form during production, which ends up cutting its fat percentage by as much as 20 percent. It's all to do with the use of electric fields, which rejig the cocoa particles inside liquid chocolate to make it pour more easily - a role usually played by the high levels of fat added to the cocoa. The researchers state that they are expecting a completely new class of healthier and tastier chocolate.

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A Chinese robot to solve city parking misery

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A laser-guided smart robot is being developed in China that parks a car in under two minutes. It can squeeze into even the smallest and most awkward spaces with no need for a driver.

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Over 40s 'have more babies' than under 20s

Over 40s 'have more babies' than under 20s | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
Women over 40 are having more babies than the under 20s for the first time in nearly 70 years, official figures for England and Wales show.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Advances in fertility treatment as well as more women in higher education and attitudes around the importance of a career and the rising costs of childbearing are behind the rise.

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Parents who think failure is harmful to learning have children who think ability is fixed

Parents who think failure is harmful to learning have children who think ability is fixed | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
So far, there's been a lot of attention on how to praise children (it's better to focus on their effort and strategies rather than their ability), but not much else. Surprisingly, parents' mindsets (growth or fixed) do not seem to be related to their children's mindsets. A new study in Psychological Science suggests this is because children can't tell what kind of mindset their parents have. Rather, children's beliefs about ability are associated with how their parents' view failure.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Children respond better to learning setbacks when they believe that ability and intelligence are malleable – that is, when they have what psychologists call a growth mindset rather than a fixed mindset.

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This Chart Shows Who Marries CEOs, Doctors, Chefs and Janitors

This Chart Shows Who Marries CEOs, Doctors, Chefs and Janitors | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
We scanned data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 American Community Survey—which covers 3.5 million households—to find out how people are pairing up. Some of the matches seemed practical (the most common marriage is between grade-school teachers), and others had us questioning Cupid’s aim (why do female dancers have a thing for male welders?). High-earning women (doctors, lawyers) tend to pair up with their economic equals, while middle- and lower-tier women often marry up. In other words, female CEOs tend to marry other CEOs; male CEOs are OK marrying their secretaries.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

When it comes to falling in love, it’s not just fate that brings people together—sometimes it’s their jobs.

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Is The Secret To A Happy Marriage In Your DNA?

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Are some people genetically predisposed to stay happily married? Researchers have found a major clue in our DNA.

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AI fighter pilot wins in combat simulation

AI fighter pilot wins in combat simulation | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

The AI, known as Alpha, used four virtual jets to successfully defend a coastline against two attacking aircraft - and did not suffer any losses. Alpha, which was developed by a US team, also triumphed in simulation against a retired human fighter pilot. One military aviation expert said the results were promising. In the simulation described in the study, both attacking jets - the blue team - had more capable weapons systems. But Alpha's red team was able to dispatch the enemy planes after performing evasive manoeuvres.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

An artificially intelligent fighter pilot system has defeated two attacking jets in a combat simulation.

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Greenery in Neighborhoods May Reduce Adolescent Aggressive Behavior

Greenery in Neighborhoods May Reduce Adolescent Aggressive Behavior | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
A study to be published in the July 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that adolescents in urban communities may have less aggressive behaviors if they live in neighborhoods with more greenery, such as parks, golf courses, or fields.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Adolescents in urban communities engage less in aggressive behaviors if they live in neighborhoods with more greenery.

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Why the World Is Better Than You Think in 10 Powerful Charts

Why the World Is Better Than You Think in 10 Powerful Charts | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

We live in a world where we are constantly bombarded by negative news from every angle. If you turn on CNN (what I call the Crisis News Network), you'll predominantly hear about death, terrorism, airplane crashes, bombings, financial crisis and political scandal. I think of the news as a drug pusher, and negative news as their drug. There's a reason for this. We humans are wired to pay 10x more attention to negative news than positive news. Being able to rapidly notice and pay attention to negative news (like a predator or a dangerous fire) was an evolutionary advantage to keep you alive on the savannas of Africa millions of years ago. Today, we still pay more attention to negative news, and the news media knows this. They take advantage of it to drive our eyeballs to their advertisers. Typically, good news networks fail as businesses. It's not that the news media is lying — it's just not a balanced view of what's going on in the world. And because your mindset matters a lot, my purpose of my work and this post is to share with you the data supporting the positive side of the equation and to give you insight to some fundamental truths about where humanity really is going. The truth is, driven by advances in exponential technologies, things are getting much better around the world at an accelerating rate.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Some good news.

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Relationship satisfaction depends on the mating pool, study finds

Relationship satisfaction depends on the mating pool, study finds | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
Relationship satisfaction and the energy devoted to keeping a partner are dependent on how the partner compares with other potential mates, a finding that relates to evolution's stronghold on modern relationship psychology, according to a study.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Demand and supply. It's the law of the jungle out there..

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Those incredible flying machines

Those incredible flying machines | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
FLYING a helicopter is tricky, especially when hovering. You use your left hand to raise and lower the collective-pitch lever (to climb or descend), your right hand to move the cyclic-pitch joystick (to go forwards, backwards and sideways) and both feet to work the anti-torque pedals (to point the nose). At first it all seems like an impossible dance, but with plenty of practice and careful co-ordination it can be mastered. Flying a drone, by comparison, is easy-peasy. Some can be operated with little or no experience using only a smartphone app. So, it was a matter of time before resourceful folk started to think about building simple-to-operate drones that are large enough for people to fly in.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

The technology is sufficiently advanced that there is nothing to stop passenger drones taking to the air, provided they can meet the same safety standards as other light aircraft and are flown by trained pilots. At a price for a small machine likely to be similar to that of an upmarket car—and a fraction of the cost of a new helicopter—they could prove extremely popular in recreational and sport aviation.

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Brain training games don’t boost IQ. Here’s what does.

Brain training games don’t boost IQ. Here’s what does. | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could all become a little smarter? The world would be better off for it. Smarter people live longer and enjoy greater well-being across their lifetimes, psychologists have found. Intelligence gives people an edge in subtle ways. High intelligence is even thought to protect people from automobile crashes. That’s why brain training games — computer-based memory puzzles — have ballooned into a billion-dollar industry in recent years. The idea is these memory games could help boost what’s known as fluid intelligence, which is the ability to reason (as opposed to crystallized, accumulated knowledge). But here is the sad truth: Brain training games likely don’t work. In January, the Federal Trade Commission called out Lumos Labs, the makers of a popular brain-training app, for deceptive advertising, and hit them with a $2 million fine. "For years, researchers have looked into brain games and found that they simply don't have the real-world benefits they purport to," Vox's Julia Belluz explained at the time.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Research demonstrates how the evidence ​in favor of brain training is likely just a placebo.

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Mens' willingness to use condoms might depend on how hot their partner is

Mens' willingness to use condoms might depend on how hot their partner is | Psychology, Health and Happiness | Scoop.it
It's no secret that condoms aren't everyone's favourite thing. But a new study has shown that, for straight men, the decision to have safe sex during a casual fling might depend more on how 'hot' they find their partner, rather than their fear of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Men less likely to use protection if sexual partner is "hot".

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