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Science Says Your Bad Attitude Could Cost You $3,600 a Year

Science Says Your Bad Attitude Could Cost You $3,600 a Year | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Most people are aware that there are many benefits to a positive attitude. Studies consistently link positive thoughts and positive emotions to everything from better performance to a longer life. But, if you're a cynic, there's a good chance you'll roll your eyes at such studies. After all, anyone who conducts research on positive thinking is probably going to find positive results, right? And, as a 'glass half-empty' kind of person, you might be thinking, "Who cares if a positive attitude will help me live a longer. I'm likely to get run over by a bus long before I grow old anyway." But, before you conclude your cynicism doesn't really matter in the long-run, consider this--a bad attitude could be costing you money right now.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Cynical people earn an average of $300 per month less than their more positive counterparts.

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Study shows regular sex improves the memory of young women

Study shows regular sex improves the memory of young women | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
A team of researchers with McGill University in Canada has found evidence that suggests that young women who engage in frequent sex experience memory improvements. In their paper published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, the researchers outline their study, which included asking young female volunteers to fill out surveys regarding their sex lives and taking memory tests.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Message to all fellow men out there: If you ever find yourself being annoyed or complaining about the fact that your wife or girlfriend appears to be able to remember EVERYTHING you've said during a random argument you had with her on a regular Tuesday 3½ years ago while shopping for groceries in a supermarket, know that you may have inadvertently contributed to the development of her exceptional memory retention skills and ability to recall verbal stimuli!

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Aerobic exercise preserves brain volume and improves cognitive function

Aerobic exercise preserves brain volume and improves cognitive function | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Using a new MRI technique, researchers found that adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who exercised four times a week over a six-month period experienced an increase in brain volume in specific, or local, areas of the brain, but adults who participated in aerobic exercise experienced greater gains than those who just stretched.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Even over a short period of time, aerobic exercise leads to a remarkable change in the brain.

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A handful of nuts a day cuts the risk of a wide range of diseases

A handful of nuts a day cuts the risk of a wide range of diseases | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
A large analysis of current research shows that people who eat at least 20g of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Nuts!

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Teens reject junk food when healthy eating is framed as rebellion

Teens reject junk food when healthy eating is framed as rebellion | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Bryan, Yeager and their colleagues recruited over 500 teenagers (aged 13 to 14; they were the entire eighth grade at a suburban middle school in Texas) and randomly assigned some to a traditional public health appeal, others to a no-treatment control, and the remainder to receive the innovative intervention. This last group read an exposé article on the food industry. It spilled the beans about the manipulative and deceptive strategies used to make junk food more addictive and to portray the products as healthy. It also included pictures of four executives and consultants of the food industry, described as stereotypical “controlling, hypocritical adult[s]”. The hope was that these adolescents would now see choosing healthy foods as an act of autonomy and independence.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

New study cleverly exploits teenagers’ instinct for rebelliousness and autonomy in order to promote healthy eating.

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Narcissistic individuals use social media to self-promote

Narcissistic individuals use social media to self-promote | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
A new statistical review of 62 studies with over 13,000 individuals found that narcissism has a modest but reliable positive relationship with a range of social media behaviors. The largest effects were with the number of friends/followers narcissists had and frequency of status updates, followed by selfie postings, according to University of Georgia psychology researchers.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Self-love: vice or virtue?

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Nearly half of America’s overweight people don’t realize they’re overweight

Nearly half of America’s overweight people don’t realize they’re overweight | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
As you prepare to pack on your holiday pounds this winter, consider this: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more Americans than ever are overweight. But according to some new Gallup data, far fewer of us actually think we're overweight.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

7 in 10 Americans are obese or overweight, but only 36 percent think they have a weight problem.

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STD rates reach record high in United States

STD rates reach record high in United States | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

The annual report, which was released on Wednesday, showed that the rates of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis -- the three most commonly reported STDs in the nation -- increased between 2014 and 2015, reaching an all-time high. Reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis rose by 19%, gonorrhea cases rose by 12.8%, and chlamydia cases rose by 5.9%, from 2014. All three STDs are curable with antibiotics, but most infections go undiagnosed and untreated, according to the CDC.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

There were more reported cases of sexually transmitted diseases last year than ever before in the United States.

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Sleep deprivation 'costs UK £40bn a year'

Sleep deprivation 'costs UK £40bn a year' | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

The calculation is based on tired employees being less productive or absent from work altogether. Research firm Rand Europe, which used data from 62,000 people, said the loss equated to 1.86% of economic growth. The biggest impact was on health, with those sleeping less than six hours a night 13% more likely to die than those sleeping between seven and nine hours. The study evaluated the economic cost of insufficient sleep in the UK, US, Canada, Germany and Japan.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Sleep-deprived workers are costing the UK economy £40bn a year and face a higher risk of death, says a new study.

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This is your brain on God: Spiritual experiences activate brain reward circuits

This is your brain on God: Spiritual experiences activate brain reward circuits | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Religious and spiritual experiences activate the brain reward circuits in much the same way as love, sex, gambling, drugs and music, report researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine. The findings will be published Nov. 29 in the journal Social Neuroscience.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Researchers have shown that powerful spiritual feelings and experiences are reproducibly associated with activation in the brain's reward center, similar to the effects of love, sex, and drugs. This is implies that religion can be both emotionally and neurologically reinforcing, which gives some explanation as to why religious conviction and practices tend to be fundamental, pervasive, and sometimes rigid and inherently resistant to change or modification.

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Creative Activities Can Boost Well-Being

Creative Activities Can Boost Well-Being | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Everyday creative activity may lead to an “upward spiral” of increased well-being and creativity in young adults, according to new research. For the study, researchers from the Department of Psychology at New Zealand’s University of Otago asked 658 university students to keep a daily diary of their experiences and emotional states over 13 days.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Research suggests a kind of upward spiral for well-being and creativity — engaging in creative behavior leads to increases in wellbeing the next day, and this increased well-being is likely to facilitate creative activity on that same day.

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Bad relationships increase risk of infection in both mother and child

Bad relationships increase risk of infection in both mother and child | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
The thesis is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), a health study that has been collecting data about mothers and their children since 1999. The study of pregnant women's infectious diseases includes more than 67.000 women. The study of children's infectious diseases includes nearly 91.000 women and more than 100.000 children.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Pregnant women dissatisfied in their relationship have an increased risk of infectious diseases. This also affects their children.

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High-Tech Pet Prosthetics Give a Leg up to Man’s Best Friend

High-Tech Pet Prosthetics Give a Leg up to Man’s Best Friend | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
New technologies like 3D-printed prosthetics have helped disabled people around the world. Now, animal orthotics are improving the lives of disabled dogs – and the occasional elephant.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Prosthetics for animals. Pretty fascinating...

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Heading a soccer ball causes instant changes to the brain

Heading a soccer ball causes instant changes to the brain | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Researchers from the University of Stirling have explored the true impact of heading a soccer ball, identifying small but significant changes in brain function immediately after routine heading practice.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Researchers have explored the true impact of heading a soccer ball, identifying small but significant changes in brain function immediately after routine heading practice.

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Yo-yo dieting might cause extra weight gain

Yo-yo dieting might cause extra weight gain | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

The authors studied a mathematical model of an animal that knows whether food is currently abundant or limited, but does not know when things will change, so must learn about the changeability before deciding how fat to be. The model shows that if food supply is often restricted (as it is when dieting) an optimal animal - the one with the best chance of passing on its genes - should gain excess weight between food shortages. Dr Andrew Higginson, Senior Lecturer in psychology at the University of Exeter, says: "Surprisingly, our model predicts that the average weight gain for dieters will actually be greater than those who never diet. "This happens because non-dieters learn that the food supply is reliable so there is less need for the insurance of fat stores."

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Repeated dieting may lead to weight gain because the brain interprets the diets as short famines and urges the person to store more fat for future shortages.

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Walking lifts your mood, even when you don’t expect it to

Walking lifts your mood, even when you don’t expect it to | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
The mere act of putting one foot in front of the other for a few minutes has a significant beneficial impact on our mood, regardless of where we do it, why we do it, or what effect we expect the walk to have. That’s according to a pair of psychologists at Iowa State University who claim their study, published in Emotion, is the first to strip away all the many confounds typically associated with exercise research – things like social contact, fresh air, nature, the satisfaction of reaching fitness goals, and the expectation of the activity being beneficial – to show that the simple act of walking, in and of itself, is a powerful mood lifter.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

New research shows that walking has a more robust and pervasive influence on affect than previously thought. People generally underestimate the extent to which just getting off their couch and going for a walk will benefit their mood.

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Saturated fat could be good for you, study suggests

Saturated fat could be good for you, study suggests | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
A new Norwegian diet intervention study (FATFUNC), performed by researchers at the KG Jebsen center for diabetes research at the University of Bergen, raises questions regarding the validity of a diet hypothesis that has dominated for more than half a century: that dietary fat and particularly saturated fat is unhealthy for most people.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A new diet intervention study raises questions regarding the validity of a diet hypothesis that has dominated for more than half a century: that dietary fat and particularly saturated fat is unhealthy for most people.

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Being part of a community group could protect you from cognitive decline

Being part of a community group could protect you from cognitive decline | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Southampton found that a person's cognitive ability at age 11; their participation in civic activities at ages 33 and 50; frequent physical activity; higher educational qualification and female gender were all associated with better cognitive function at age 50. Having low socio-economic status as a child and reporting worse mental well-being in adulthood were both associated with worse cognitive function at age 50.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Social engagement through civic group activities, such as being a member of a political party, an environmental group, neighborhood watch, a voluntary service group or other community based groups, is associated with better cognitive function at age 50.

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Small delay in school start time may improve teens’ sleep and focus

Small delay in school start time may improve teens’ sleep and focus | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Teens in Hong Kong whose high school delayed the start of the day by just 15 minutes got to sleep a little longer, were late to school less often and showed better mental health and focus, according to a new study.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Kids and teenagers require way more sleep that what the traditional school system offers them. Even a 15 minute delay has a noticeable effect.

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Smartduvet doesn't think you should make your bed and will do it for you

Smartduvet doesn't think you should make your bed and will do it for you | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Most people wouldn’t peg making their bed as their least favorite chore, but at least one person out there hated it so much that they sought to automate the entire process. From that, the Smartduvet was born. Currently featured on Kickstarter, the Smartduvet isn’t meant to replace your existing bedding, only enhance it. Its design features an inflatable layer between the duvet and the cover that is controlled by a phone app. With a few clicks on the app, you can activate your Smartduvet to make the bed instantly. It even has the ability to schedule bed makings for a particular desired time. Each day can be scheduled individually so that you can sleep in on the weekends if you really want to.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

OMG it's a self-making bed!!!!

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Study on the attractiveness of boobs suggests breast shape may be more important than size

Study on the attractiveness of boobs suggests breast shape may be more important than size | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Men find firm breasts most attractive — but have differing opinions of how big they should be, according to research published in Evolution & Human Behavior.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

I suppose quality over quantity...

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Children involved in cyber-bullying much more likely to view web content containing self-harm and suicide

Children involved in cyber-bullying much more likely to view web content containing self-harm and suicide | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
A new LSE study on the link between cyber-bullying and suicide has found that ten per cent of children are involved in cyber-bullying, as victims, perpetrators or both, and that they are much more likely to view web content containing self-harm and suicide. It calls for more web-based prevention and intervention strategies to tackle the issue.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Ten per cent of children are involved in cyber-bullying, as victims, perpetrators or both, and are much more likely to view web content containing self-harm and suicide.

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Football Can Lead To Subtle Brain Changes, In Both Kids And Adults

Football Can Lead To Subtle Brain Changes, In Both Kids And Adults | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

Recently, research has begun to suggest that there may be hope of detecting problems in the brain before it’s too late. Two new studies highlight the fact that very early and subtle changes in the brain may be detectable with newer imaging techniques. This is very good news, since it hints that early markers of sports-related brain damage may be possible—when there’s still time to do something about it.

 

See also:

Thinning of brain tissue remains in college football players, five years after play

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161130144010.htm

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Impacts to the head in sports like football, soccer and boxing can lead to long-lasting brain changes, and in the worst cases, brain degeneration, is not up for debate anymore. Now, new research supports previous findings that even subconcussive injuries can cause damage.

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The Psychology of Eye Contact, Digested

The Psychology of Eye Contact, Digested | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it
Many of our relationships begin with that moment when our eyes meet and we realise the other person is looking right at us. Pause for a second and consider the intensity of the situation, the near-magical state of two brains simultaneously processing one another, each aware of being, at that very instant, the centre of the other’s mental world. Psychologists have made some surprising discoveries about the way that mutual gaze, or the lack of it, affects us mentally and physically and how we relate to each other.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

The fascinating psychology of eye contact, from tiny babies’ sensitivity to gaze to the hallucination-inducing effects of prolonged eye-staring.

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How Are You Doing? Only 1 Out of 5 Adults Truly Mean It When They Answer They Are 'Fine'

How Are You Doing? Only 1 Out of 5 Adults Truly Mean It When They Answer They Are 'Fine' | Psychology and Health | Scoop.it

People often put on a brave face so that their family and friends won't have to worry about them. A new study even showed that only one out of five people who say they feel "fine" really mean it. The study was conducted by the Mental Health Foundation (MHF), according to the Daily Mail. In their research, which was conducted on 2,000 Britons, a third of the respondents admitted that they often lie about how they are feeling when asked. The average adult will insist they are "fine" for 14 times a week, but only one out of five truly mean it. Around 34 percent of the respondents shared that they chose to say they are "fine" because it's more convenient than expressing how they really feel. Meanwhile, 23 percent of them said they'd rather say they are "fine" because they think the person who is asking isn't really all that interested to know what's going on in their lives. It seems like the dishonesty goes both ways since 59 percent of the respondents said they already expect the person they are talking to to lie about how they are feeling.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Always remember, 'FINE' is just an abbreviation of Failing In Nearly Everything!

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