Psychology and Brain News
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Psychology and Brain News
Latest news on psychology, mental health, neural and behavioral sciences
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In recognizing faces, the whole is not greater than the sum of its parts

In recognizing faces, the whole is not greater than the sum of its parts | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it
How do we recognize a face? To date, most research has answered holistically: We look at all the features simultaneously and, perceiving the relationships among them, gain an advantage over taking in each feature individually.
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New Research Helps Explain How The Brain Decides What Is A Face And What Just Resembles One

New Research Helps Explain How The Brain Decides What Is A Face And What Just Resembles One | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it

Objects that resemble faces are everywhere. Whether it's New Hampshire's erstwhile granite "Old Man of the Mountain," or Jesus' face on a tortilla, our brains are adept at locating images that look like faces.

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Babies can tell whether you made a mistake or not from the tone of your voice

Babies can tell whether you made a mistake or not from the tone of your voice | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it

"We propose that infants' understanding of vocal patterns supports their growing understanding of intentions," Gattis told The Digest. "Together these two forms of understanding shape the development of imitation and communication."

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Patterns of connections reveal brain functions

Patterns of connections reveal brain functions | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it
For more than a decade, neuroscientists have known that many of the cells in a brain region called the fusiform gyrus specialize in recognizing faces. However, those cells don't act alone: They need to communicate with several other parts of the brain. By tracing those connections, MIT neuroscientists have now shown that they can accurately predict which parts of the fusiform gyrus are face-selective.
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