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Latest news on psychology, mental health, neural and behavioral sciences
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Bilingual children switch tasks faster than speakers of a single language

Bilingual children switch tasks faster than speakers of a single language | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it
Children who grow up learning to speak two languages are better at switching between tasks than are children who learn to speak only one language, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health.
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In immersion foreign language learning, adults attain, retain native speaker brain pattern

In immersion foreign language learning, adults attain, retain native speaker brain pattern | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it

In a series of studies, researchers demonstrate that the kind of exposure you have to a foreign language can determine whether you achieve native-language brain processing

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Predicting children’s language development

Predicting children’s language development | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it
We depend on a barrage of standardized tests to assess everything from aptitude to intelligence. But do they provide an accurate forecast when it comes to something as complex as language?
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Deb Roy: The birth of a word | Video on TED.com

MIT researcher Deb Roy wanted to understand how his infant son learned language -- so he wired up his house with videocameras to catch every moment (with exceptions) of his son's life, then parsed 90,000 hours of home video to watch "gaaaa" slowly turn into "water." Astonishing, data-rich research with deep implications for how we learn.

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Ape hand gestures reveal where humans evolved language

Ape hand gestures reveal where humans evolved language | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it

Until recently, scientists figured that the origins of human language could be found in our vocal cords. That seems reasonable enough, but the latest evidence suggests our hands are actually the source of language...and a bunch of hand-waving primates agree.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Bilingualism Will Supercharge Your Baby’s Brain

Bilingualism Will Supercharge Your Baby’s Brain | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it

Bilingual toddlers have an improved ability to resolve “conflict cues.” In other words, their minds are more flexible – better able to unlearn previously learned rules in light of new, conflicting information.

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Notes from Two Scientific Psychologists: Did language emerge from the neural systems supporting aimed throwing?

Notes from Two Scientific Psychologists: Did language emerge from the neural systems supporting aimed throwing? | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it

Aimed throwing is surprisingly uncommon in the animal kingdom. Humans do it par excellence, and otherwise it only shows up occasionally, even in our closest relatives. Chimpanzees will throw things (often faeces) but unlike humans don't throw things when hunting or trying to get food; when non-human animals throw things, it's usually part of a social encounter.

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Cultural Differences May Impact Neurologic And Psychiatric Rehabilitation Of Spanish Speakers

Cultural Differences May Impact Neurologic And Psychiatric Rehabilitation Of Spanish Speakers | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it
The number of people with neurological and psychiatric disorders in Spanish-speaking countries has increased over the past two decades.
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Prenatal testosterone linked to increased risk of language delay for male infants

Prenatal testosterone linked to increased risk of language delay for male infants | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it
New research by Australian scientists reveals that males who are exposed to high levels of testosterone before birth are twice as likely to experience delays in language development compared to females.
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'Language gene' speeds learning

'Language gene' speeds learning | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it

A mutation that appeared more than half a million years ago may have helped humans learn the complex muscle movements that are critical to speech and language.


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Ten years of the language gene that wasn’t

Ten years of the language gene that wasn’t | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it

It's now ten years since mutations in the FOXP2 gene were linked to language problems, which led to lots of overblown headlines about a 'language gene', which it isn't.

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Hearing Bilingual: How Babies Tell Languages Apart

Hearing Bilingual: How Babies Tell Languages Apart | Psychology and Brain News | Scoop.it
Scientists are teasing out the earliest differences between brains exposed to one language and brains exposed to two.
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Andrew Stoops's curator insight, November 12, 2014 8:43 PM

This article was interesting in that you wouldn't really think about this unless you grew up in a bilingual house. Even then you may not realize that you have had to listen and grow up trying to discern between two languages. Babies can actually tell the difference and that fascinates me.

Noah Bolitho's curator insight, November 12, 2014 10:34 PM

I found this article from Andrew Stoops. Thanks man! I really liked it because because I come from a semi-bilingual family. My mom spoke fluent English and I either lived with my grandparents or they lived with me, and they really only knew Spanish, they knew very little English. I could have very easily learned Spanish well and be able to speak it but because I didn't need it outside of the house I never learned to use it. I really envy those that grew up speaking both languages. 

Kelli Jones's curator insight, December 2, 2014 1:48 AM

This article talks about the benefits of teaching children more than one language. I think that Kinds should learn more than one language. Learning more than one language allows to communicate with all different types of people from all different places around the world. I wish that my parents knew a second language that they could have taught me. My friend Summer's mom speaks fluent spanish. I often hear her speaking it around the community and to other people that she knows can speak Spanish. But she didn't teach it to Summer or her siblings and Sumer wishes that she would have so that she wouldn't be taking spanish in high but she could learn another language instead.