Psycholitics & Psychonomics
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I have come to the conclusion that politics are too serious a matter to be left to the politicians. DeGaulle
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Government Unable to Define 'Homeland Security' | Threat Level | Wired.com

Government Unable to Define 'Homeland Security' | Threat Level | Wired.com | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
What is "homeland security?" The federal bureaucracy doesn't know, and that's problematic for a government that has been fighting the ill-defined "war on terror" following 9/11, according to a Wednesday report from the Congressional Research Service.
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Gitmo's Troubling Afterlife: The Global Consequences of U.S. Detention Policy

Gitmo's Troubling Afterlife: The Global Consequences of U.S. Detention Policy | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
Closing the camps in Guantánamo Bay won't address the real problems with noncriminal incarceration.

 

'Senator Dianne Feinstein recently commissioned a Government Accountability Office report identifying prison facilities in the continental United States suitable for detainees currently held in Guantánamo Bay. After Fox News reported about this document, her office released a statement saying that the GAO's study "demonstrates that if the political will exists, we could finally close Guantánamo without imperiling our national security."

 

Independently, a coalition of advocacy groups sent President Obama an open letter on Tuesday urging him to veto the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act if it impedes the administration's ability to close Guantánamo.

 

Thus, though U.S. detention policy was not a contested part of the 2012 election, it may reemerge as a political issue. Benjamin Wittes of the Brookings Institution noted in his essential volume Detention and Denial that current public discussion of the issue represents "denial and obfuscation," in that "we pretend that noncriminal detention doesn't exist or that we're phasing it out" rather than facing the daunting task of reforming it. The early stages of this new round of wrangling over detention policy, unfortunately, seem to represent another step in the direction of denial rather than toward reform.'

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