Psycholitics & Psychonomics
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I have come to the conclusion that politics are too serious a matter to be left to the politicians. DeGaulle
Curated by Janet Devlin
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Beyond survivors: A psychologist’s story

Beyond survivors: A psychologist’s story | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
Brazilian psychologist and human rights activist Vera Vital Brasil knows from experience what she is talking about when she tells about her years of work with torture victims. Joining with other su...
Janet Devlin's insight:

“The damage caused by torture is accentuated if it is ignored, if there is no justice, or no redress. The fact that the state, which should guarantee and protect human life, is the agent of violence has a devastating effect on people’s psychological well-being. Our clinical practice is insufficient to cure this damage. But we can try to get people who have gone through this harrowing experience to feel better and give another meaning to this suffering, shifting it from a personal and private level to the collective and historical level, “she says.

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Why The Hazaras Are Fleeing | newmatilda.com

Why The Hazaras Are Fleeing | newmatilda.com | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it

Hazaras are the largest ethnic group coming to Australia by boat.

 

'Hazaras are the largest ethnic group coming to Australia by boat. They're escaping sectarian massacres that may get worse after the end of the Afghan War, writes former refugee Hadi Zaher'

 

Members of the community are the target of execution style killings and massacres by Taliban and Al-Qaida affiliated militants who have vowed to rid Pakistan of the presence of minorities such as Hazaras. The frequency of these attacks has gone from a few attacks a month to multiple attacks per week.

 

The Hazaras are disappointed with apathy of the international community, in particular the inaction of the United Nations. In both Afghanistan and Pakistan, they continue to be victimised by militants who enjoy support from powerful elements within the government. They cannot turn to Pakistani security agencies in hope of protection and have for too long appealed to the international community to come to their aid — all to no avail.'

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New Statesman - While we wring our hands over Syria, there’s silence over torture in Bahrain

New Statesman - While we wring our hands over Syria, there’s silence over torture in Bahrain | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
The unrest in Bahrain is quietly ignored by our leaders and relegated by journalists to the box marked “news in brief”.

 

'Over the past 18 months, Bahraini security forces, aided by troops from Saudi Arabia, have engaged in a brutal crackdown against the island nation’s own Syria-style uprising. Bahrain is home to the Arab Spring’s forgotten revolution. Since February 2011, there have been near-daily protests against the regime, a repressive Sunni monarchy ruling over a Shia-majority country. These have been met with tear gas, live ammunition, mass arrests and torture. While the fighting in Syria is debated in the corridors of the United Nations building and reported on the front pages of the world’s newspapers, the unrest in Bahrain is quietly ignored by our leaders and relegated by journalists to the box marked “news in brief”.'

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Tibet's Exiled Democrat | newmatilda.com

Tibet's Exiled Democrat | newmatilda.com | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it

Tibet’s elected leader, Dr Lobsang Sangay, is currently touring Australia but he won’t meet government officials.

 

'On Saturday the prime minister-elect of one of the world’s newest and most promising democracies touched down in Melbourne for a week-long Australian visit. He’s being met by hundreds of compatriots and received enthusiastically by journalists, scholars, parliamentarians and the public at large.

Perversely, he will not get to meet 'the Australian] Prime Minster, Foreign Minister or government officials, at least not in any formal capacity. Canberra refuses to recognise his administration or build relationships with its elected officers.

 

.............. Tibetans are often unable to speak of their grievances without grave risk, let alone vote to throw out a government that has failed them ever since it invaded their country over half a century ago.

 

The contrast between Tibetan democracy-in-exile and China’s refusal to grant the barest of democratic rights inside Tibet represents two very different long-term futures for [Australia's] biggest trading partner.'

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