Psycholitics & Psychonomics
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I have come to the conclusion that politics are too serious a matter to be left to the politicians. DeGaulle
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The Other Bradley Manning: Jeremy Hammond Faces Life Term for WikiLeaks and Hacked Stratfor Emails

The Other Bradley Manning: Jeremy Hammond Faces Life Term for WikiLeaks and Hacked Stratfor Emails | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
A federal judge has refused to recuse herself from the closely watched trial of jailed computer hacker Jeremy Hammond, an alleged member of the group "Anonymous" charged with hacking into the computers of the private intelligence firm Stratfor and...
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More women, less corruption? | Avaaz

More women, less corruption? | Avaaz | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it

Do a greater number of women in leadership roles reduce corruption?

 

Are women leaders less corrupt than their male counterparts? That's a tricky one. The answer, it seems, is something like yes and no.


It's a loaded question, but it's also a terribly important one. Let's start with a well-known 1999 World Bank study that found that corruption decreased 10% for every standard deviation point increase in women in public office above 10.9 percent.

 

That seems like pretty straightforward evidence, but things may not be that simple. Countries with more women in positions of power do tend to be less corrupt than their less egalitarian neighbours. But that trend may have more to do with transparent and accountable systems of governance rather than gender.


Reuters cites a new study entitled Fairer Sex or Purity Myth?:
The report found that in autocratic regimes with strong male hierarchies, more women in power had little measurable impact on corruption, but that in more open, democratic political systems the change was noticeable.'

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Ramadan in Aleppo

Ramadan in Aleppo | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
After nearly 18 months and some 20,000 dead, Western and Arab governments are still debating the geopolitical pros and cons of intervening in Syria.

 

'After nearly 18 months, with over 20,000 dead and millions more directly affected, the Syrian revolution has become the foreign policy preoccupation of every Western and Arab government. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's few remaining allies -- China, Iran, and Russia -- show no sign of acceding to the aspirations of the Syrian people. And so what started out as a movement for economic reform, and was met with great violence, has now morphed into an armed insurgency, consisting overwhelmingly of civilians aiming to end the regime through force.'

 

'Here were the Free Syrian Street Sweepers. Boys as young as 12 were at work all around the city picking up the day's trash or, in some cases, clearing rubble left after the siege.

 

One young boy told me he was on cleanup duty because for his whole life (and decades before that, too) to do anything spontaneous or willful in Syria required government permission. Another joked that the garbage bag in his hand was where he wanted Assad to go. The main boulevard was colored by minibuses emblazoned with the pre-Baathist Syrian flag -- rebranded the "independence" flag -- and pro-FSA slogans. Flashing headlights and loud horns gave the street an ecstatic energy that seemed completely at odds with the grinding and bloody civil war raging elsewhere. At a surprisingly chic hookah café with leather sofas and a plasma television, locals watched international news channels into the early hours of the morning. The strawberry smoothies were first-rate.'

 

 

 

 

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The rise of the political footy fan - On Line Opinion - 12/7/2012

The rise of the political footy fan - On Line Opinion - 12/7/2012 | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
Footy fan politics emerge when policy and debate give way to instinct and emotion.

 

'With a few notable exceptions, we are currently watching perhaps the most timid, reactionary generation of politicians to ever serve this country. In a democracy, you truly get the government you deserve and it is time to demand better.'

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Diagnosing the inequality problems of open health

Diagnosing the inequality problems of open health | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
Open health programs create a range of ethical concerns. Some of these are old, and some are new; some need action now, and some need a longer view.Responding to these concerns requires the use of a…
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The centrifuge that is Bosnia

The centrifuge that is Bosnia | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
The unraveling of Bosnian democracy...

 

'The 1995 Dayton accords that ended Bosnia’s three-year bloody war did not quell the virulent disagreements among the country’s three largest nationalities: Bosniaks, Serbs and Croats. Moreover, Dayton bequeathed Bosnia a dysfunctional and excessively redundant constitutional structure. The international community’s representative to Bosnia noted a few years ago that the country of 4 million people has “two entities [for] three constituent peoples; five presidents, four vice presidents, 13 prime ministers, 14 parliaments, 147 ministers and 700 members of Parliament.”'

 

'While the United States understandably focuses on the Middle East and Central Asia, democracy in Bosnia and Herzegovina, once considered a rare transatlantic success story, is in danger of unraveling.'

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Deliberative Democracy

Deliberative Democracy | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
What decisions would we make if we deliberated carefully about public policy? Alexander Görlach sat down with Stanford's James Fishkin to discuss deliberative democracy, parliamentary discontent, and the future of the two-party system.

 

'Most people are not well informed about public policy. They are rationally ignorant: their vote is only one among millions, so why should they care? What we want to show is that these people don’t lack the competence to make informed decisions. If we give them the right information, in an institutional design where they become seriously engaged in competing arguments, they will make informed and thoughtful judgments. One thing we don’t seek is consensus. Consensus usually distorts judgments because of the social pressure that is involved. We want to avoid those forms of pressure, or the top-down approach of a telephone poll. It turns out that when people think about the issues, they are very thoughtful.'

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Modern politics is too clever by half ... and we're worse off for it

Modern politics is too clever by half ...  and we're worse off for it | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
In 19th century Australia, democrats such as Henry Parkes could not emphasise too much how important it was to elect a Parliamentary representative who was honourable, decent and able to work on behalf…...

 

'Unfortunately in the 21st century politics, and especially “clever politics”, would appear to be in the ascendant. This is the age of “whatever it takes”, of using any scheme or device to acquire power and to stay in power. Being in power seems to be an end in itself.

 

We would seem to be living in the age of Machiavelli, except even Machiavelli understood that rulers did what they did, not for their own self-aggrandisement, but in order to benefit the common good. Doing “whatever it takes” is simply wrong if it is done out of self interest.'

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