Psycholitics & Psychonomics
1.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Psycholitics & Psychonomics
I have come to the conclusion that politics are too serious a matter to be left to the politicians. DeGaulle
Curated by Janet Devlin
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Janet Devlin
Scoop.it!

Islamic Capitalism and Finance: Origins, Evolution and the Future | Murat Cizakca

Islamic Capitalism and Finance: Origins, Evolution and the Future | Murat Cizakca | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
For a millennium, from the seventh to the seventeenth century, Muslims controlled the intercontinental and transoceanic trade between Europe and the Indian Ocean. While doing this, they also created one of the greatest civilizations of the world.
Janet Devlin's insight:

"It was a humbling experience to read the product of such a remarkable feat of scholarship. It is all at once an exploration in analytic history and a comprehensive text of Islamic finance theory and application. It is also one of the most succinct renditions of evolution of Islamic finance embedded in a comprehensive account of particularities of economies as diverse as Malaysia and Turkey. This is a unique contribution to Islamic finance and Islamic economic history. It has been a rewarding learning experience. It is truly a breathtaking effort."

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Janet Devlin
Scoop.it!

Ramadan in Aleppo

Ramadan in Aleppo | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
After nearly 18 months and some 20,000 dead, Western and Arab governments are still debating the geopolitical pros and cons of intervening in Syria.

 

'After nearly 18 months, with over 20,000 dead and millions more directly affected, the Syrian revolution has become the foreign policy preoccupation of every Western and Arab government. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's few remaining allies -- China, Iran, and Russia -- show no sign of acceding to the aspirations of the Syrian people. And so what started out as a movement for economic reform, and was met with great violence, has now morphed into an armed insurgency, consisting overwhelmingly of civilians aiming to end the regime through force.'

 

'Here were the Free Syrian Street Sweepers. Boys as young as 12 were at work all around the city picking up the day's trash or, in some cases, clearing rubble left after the siege.

 

One young boy told me he was on cleanup duty because for his whole life (and decades before that, too) to do anything spontaneous or willful in Syria required government permission. Another joked that the garbage bag in his hand was where he wanted Assad to go. The main boulevard was colored by minibuses emblazoned with the pre-Baathist Syrian flag -- rebranded the "independence" flag -- and pro-FSA slogans. Flashing headlights and loud horns gave the street an ecstatic energy that seemed completely at odds with the grinding and bloody civil war raging elsewhere. At a surprisingly chic hookah café with leather sofas and a plasma television, locals watched international news channels into the early hours of the morning. The strawberry smoothies were first-rate.'

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Janet Devlin
Scoop.it!

Islam, racists, and legitimate debate - Russell Blackford - Talking Philosophy - RichardDawkins.net

Islam, racists, and legitimate debate - Russell Blackford - Talking Philosophy - RichardDawkins.net | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
Islam, racists, and legitimate debate - Russell Blackford - Talking Philosophy http://t.co/3VqM6EPM | Richard Dawkins...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Janet Devlin
Scoop.it!

Is Islam to blame for freedom deficit in Middle East? - On Line Opinion - 10/7/2012

Is Islam to blame for freedom deficit in Middle East? - On Line Opinion - 10/7/2012 | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
Researchers mull why freedom and development flourished in the Middle East then faded.

 

'Likewise, research by Harvard economist Eric Chaney debunks theories that the root cause of the democracy deficit in the Middle East is Islam or Arab cultural patterns, oil, the Arab-Israeli conflict or desert ecology. The democratic deficit, as reflected in the prevalence of autocracies in the Muslim-Arab world, is real, Chaney notes, but it's a product of the long-run influence of control structures developed in the centuries following the Arab conquests.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Janet Devlin
Scoop.it!

A fall snapshot of Arab Spring: The profit motive outweighs the prophet motive.

A fall snapshot of Arab Spring: The profit motive outweighs the prophet motive. | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
Short on certainties, a Harvard panel convenes nearly two years after the start of the Arab Spring to offer perspectives on the past, present, and future.

 

'In the absence of certainties, the panel of lawyers, political scientists, and historians supplied perspective. Only one thing is sure: The Arab Spring rose from deep in the past, and the issues it stirred up may be resolved only far in the future. “It’s only two years into the process,” said Khalidi. “It’s far too early,” added Owen, in reference to constitution making. “Let’s come back in 10 years’ time.”'

 

'Three main Islamist trends now thread through the Arab Spring, adding to its complexity, said Khalidi. At one end is a “tiny minority” of Jihadist fighters with no respect for the political process, but whose influence belies their numbers. After all, they are armed, organized, combat-hardened, and ruthless, qualities that are prized in, say, Syria. He called that war-wracked country “the most fraught consequence of the Arab Spring.”


On the other end of Islamist political trends stands the Muslim Brotherhood, now most prominently in power in Egypt. Its members are neoliberal and favor making money above all, said Khalidi, because “The profit motive outweighs the prophet motive.” Between these two trends are the Salafists, ultraconservative Islamists whose aim is to impose Sharia law, even in societies, such as in Egypt, where secular liberals remain a potent force.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Janet Devlin
Scoop.it!

Former envoy talks Syria, chess game of diplomacy

Former envoy talks Syria, chess game of diplomacy | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
There is no shortage of pundits and foreign policy experts who have offered opinions on the Syrian civil war, but few have spent as many years watching this geopolitical crossroads as closely as Edward Djerejian, a former ambassador to Syria and...

 

'I think that fundamentally what happened in Syria was the very same manifestation of what happened in Tunisia, Libya, Yemen and other Arab countries, which was a grass-roots protest movement, largely on the part of the youth of the country, who were reclaiming their individual rights: the right to a job, the opportunity to have an education, the right to housing, the right to participate in the structure of the state.'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Janet Devlin
Scoop.it!

Iran Steps Up Diplomatic Efforts To Ease Isolation

Iran Steps Up Diplomatic Efforts To Ease Isolation | Psycholitics & Psychonomics | Scoop.it
Iran’s Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi has an op-ed in today’s Washington Post in which he declares the Iranian regime on the side of freedom and reform in the Middle East, and ready to help .

 

'......  it’s important to see Iran’s increased diplomatic activism as a reaction to the tightening sanctions and increased isolation resulting from their failure to adequately address concerns over its nuclear work.'

more...
No comment yet.