Psychogeography
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Psychogeography
Walking & Wandering through Cities, Edgelands, Unplaces, Liminal Zones and Imaginary Worlds
Curated by Gareth Rees
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Edgelands | Babis Kougemitros

Edgelands | Babis Kougemitros | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
These pictures are the product of my last two-year wandering in several places and areas of Attica (Greece), the zone between the city edges and the countryside. They depict vague, ambiguous and...
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Walk to the Hill – Field Notes by Maxim Griffin

Walk to the Hill – Field Notes by Maxim Griffin | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

You have to walk to the hill.

Out of town, through the holloway at Deighton Close – by the old school for naughty boys –  at the right time of year you’ll see a few deer in the parkland (it’s Autumn – they are no where to be seen)

The lane becomes a track – pheasant trap on the right – Danny Champion of the World – The track becomes furrowed and muddy-

hoof prints – skirt round the farm yard – the way becomes the path – over the fence (carefully – either side is strung with electric)

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Marine Court: Hymn to the Sun

Marine Court: Hymn to the Sun | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
A crumbling art deco apartment block designed to resemble the Queen Mary is one of the glories of England's south coast. Iain Sinclair is seduced by its faded charms
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Lost Between Stations

Lost Between Stations | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

Matthew Clegg’s Lost Between Stations appeared as a pamphlet and CD from Longbarrow Press in 2011. It comprises seven long narrative poems, each of which focuses on the relationship between predicament and place in and around the city of Leeds (drawing on the period 1988-1997)

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Hauntology and Psychogeography Inspire New Album From Drew Mulholland of Mount Vernon Arts Lab Fame - Helen I Hwang

Hauntology and Psychogeography Inspire New Album From Drew Mulholland of Mount Vernon Arts Lab Fame - Helen I Hwang | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

'Mulholland has finally elevated from the ashes of the Mount Vernon Arts Lab, raised in resurrection with The Norwood Variations. More albums will follow, provided he finds the money to release them. He's also writing books on psychogeography, folklore and hauntology. Avant-garde composer and musician, one-time guitar tech for Patti Smith and academic lecturer, Drew Mulholland has graced his fans with his first album in 11 years.' 


Via Sean Albiez
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The Ancestral Giant of the A303

The Ancestral Giant of the A303 | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

The town of Amesbury, nestled in the heart of Salisbury plain by a loop in the River Avon, is the final stop on the A303 before Stonehenge.

 

It’s one of the oldest consecutively inhabited areas in Britain. Recent findings of hand-hewn flint tools and cooked bones indicate that humans settled here more than 5000 years before the construction of those famous stones.

 

Approaching traffic pours through a basin in the chalk downland, and comes to a crunching halt at Amesbury’s roundabout, where a queue of cars stretches towards Stonehenge on the brow of the next hill.

The landscape on either side of this stretch of the A303 is a fusion of rural, retail and military zones. Bulford Camp lies to the north beyond a camber of freshly farmed green, clustered with pylons, telegraph poles and signal masts.

 

To the south, you'll find The Solstice Park...

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A Weird Trip to Rye Harbour

A Weird Trip to Rye Harbour | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

A live performance of Rye’s Valhalla, in which Rees and Budden become disorientated on the Sussex coast.

Gareth Rees's insight:

Here's a video of me and fellow walker/writer Gary Budden, performing a piece about our trip to Rye Harbour Nature Reserve.

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A rampant gestation of weird histories and myths in East London's Marshland

A rampant gestation of weird histories and myths in East London's Marshland | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

Let’s face it, East London (and particularly Hackney) has been overmapped. It has been pulled apart, placed under the microscope and jammed back together. It seems there is little space for a writer who wishes to write about it. This makes Marshland a very pleasant surprise indeed.

 

Rather than focussing on the urban sprawl, Rees’ shifts attention to ‘the edge of London’: the wild greenbands of Hackney, Walthamstow and Leyton Marshes which has, relative to the rest of London, remained remarkably untouched… until, that is, the Olympics was announced.

 

The marshes are perfect ground for the rampant gestation of weird little histories and myths, a world were outsiders can roam free from the glare of authorities. Escaping the pressures of family life, Rees takes his dog Hendrix on daily walks around the marshes, and its these walks the book is framed around. His anecdotal experiences are strange enough. He stumbles across sex games, pilled up ravers on their low ebb, and a whole host of odd interactions with others seeking refuge in the city’s wilderness. 

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Particulations: The New Psychogeography

Particulations: The New Psychogeography | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
At the beginning of October I was kindly invited by Dr. Rowan Bailey to give a lecture to the Art, Design and Architecture MA students at the University of Huddersfield. My spec involved incorporating psychogeography into theoretical approaches to the postmodern city and, in particular, my own research in this area. So I got to thinking more about a section in the upcoming edited volume that I’m working on – Walking Inside Out: Contemporary British Psychogeography – that I had entitled ‘The New Psychogeography’ and decided to include that in the title of the lecture: ‘Postmodern Urbanism and the New Psychogeography’ (if you want to see the lecture slides properly, it is better to download them than scroll through due to the animation).
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A Sussex Atlantis

A Sussex Atlantis | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

The train stops at a level crossing in an East Sussex field. As the train pulls away I’m left on a tiny platform beside a sign which reads:

Winchelsea

Ancient Town, Cinque Port

Winchelsea town is ½ mile south east of the station

 

A country road winds south east through freshly cropped fields, criss-crossed with telegraph poles and littered with crows. There’s no sign of a town, only a leafy hill rising in the distance. This must be the ‘new’ Winchelsea, built out of harm’s way in 1288 at the orders of Edward I.

 

The original town lies beneath the sea, beyond Camber Sands. Its death began with a climate shift in 1233. Storms battered the coastline. Heavy rains and high tides brought floods. Then in 1250, there was a great storm, described by the chronicler Holinshed:

 

“On the first day of October the moon, upon her change, appearing exceeding red and swelled, began to show tokens of the great tempest of wind that followed, which was so huge and mightie, both by land and sea, that the like had not been lightlie knowne, and seldome, or rather never heard of by men then alive.”

 

During this storm the sea tide did not ebb, rather it surged through the town with biblical ferocity, destroying bridges, mills, houses and churches. The shingle bank on which Winchelsea was built began to break up. By 1258, the sea was surging further inland, sweeping away large parts of the town. And by 1287 the whole place was under water.

For a few years, the displaced townsfolk could see ruins of their home at low tide.

 

Then it vanished forever, a Sussex Atlantis....

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Rye’s Valhalla | The Learned Pig

Rye’s Valhalla | The Learned Pig | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

Influx Press’s editor-at-large, Gary Budden, and author of Marshland, Gareth E. Rees, venture into Rye Harbour with inadequate footwear and a 1904 guide to Sussex.

 

They discover more than they’d bargained for…

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Unseen Beacons – Photography by Matt Botwood

Unseen Beacons – Photography by Matt Botwood | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

In this ongoing project I am trying to capture views of the Brecon Beacons that are edited out of most landscape imagery, and show more of the everyday life that goes on in the National Park and some of its history.

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Unofficial Britain Soundtrack

A selection of UK-based music, all released in 2014, which touches upon themes of landscape, time consciousness, folklore, hauntology and uncanny narratives. In other words, a soundtrack to the Unofficial Britain year.

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Staples Corner, and How We Can Know It | Unofficial Britain.

Staples Corner, and How We Can Know It | Unofficial Britain. | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

In the weak and watery November light of a Monday afternoon, you sit with your nose pressed against the cold glass of the 266 bus. You think on what awful chain of events led you here, the end of your known world.

 

Dimly, you are aware you have lost something and that you must replace it. As penance, perhaps, you travel to Staples Corner.

As Cricklewood fades and concrete begins to colonise the landscape, you know you are headed to a divine meeting of arteries. Repeat their names… M1. A406. North Circular.


You exit the 266 and wonder how this web of underpasses and roundabouts can function. You are here. Your destination stands temple-like over there. And as the lorries force fumes into your lungs, you panic and wonder how to cross. Slowly, the Escher-like scene assumes some logic. A zebra crossing, an underpass. All is well. You feel a pleasant nostalgia for boundary-pushing ’70s English novels as you cross.

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The Quietus | Features | Tome On The Range | A Tsunami Of Images: Iain Sinclair Interviewed

The Quietus | Features | Tome On The Range | A Tsunami Of Images: Iain Sinclair Interviewed | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Stephanie Boland sits down with the veteran writer and filmmaker to discuss the life-changing effects of the London Overground, the apparent death of the novel, the relationship between cinema and architecture, and putting together his new book - 70x70. Unlicensed Preaching: A Life Unpacked In 70 Films
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Marshland at Spike Island | Unofficial Britain.

Marshland at Spike Island | Unofficial Britain. | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

On November 27th, I’m going to be at Spike Island in Bristol, talking about my book Marshland, a trip through the marshes of East London, where I encounter a lost world of Victorian filter plants, apocalyptic tribes, haunted toy factories, bears and crocodiles.

 

It takes place in the Spike Island Associates Space at 6.30pm. Tickets are £5/£3 concessions and can be booked ONLINE HERE.

 

After the talk I’m hopping across to The Orchard pub to perform A Dream Life of Hackney Marshes with Jetsam, a sonic dream-walk narrated by a man who falls in love with an electricity pylon. The album – a mix of chamber music, electronics and postrock – was released last year on Clay Pipe Music and illustrated by Frances Castle.

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Is this the first published use of the term 'psychogeography'?

Is this the first published use of the term 'psychogeography'? | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
"The science of anthropogeography, or more properly speaking, psychogeography, deals with the influence of geographical environment on the human mind." J. Walter Fewkes, Bureau of American Ethnolog...
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A Sound Walk On Walthamstow Marsh

A Sound Walk On Walthamstow Marsh | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

Constructed from field recordings collected on Walthamstow Marshes, this single track plays out an afternoon’s walk. Sounds, natural and man made, compete in this area of wilderness in London’s East End. Though for the most part a sound collage, the clang of a metal footbridge and the ring of a bicycle bell have been manipulated to form occasional backing.

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High Rise: a Homage to North East England Brutalism

High Rise: a Homage to North East England Brutalism | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

Derwent Tower (also known as The Dunston Rocket) will be remembered as both a concrete eyesore and a landmark Brutalist structure.

 

Caisson’s High Rise presents itself as a 45-minute monolithic drone, a low-end void exploration, a homage to Northern East England Brutalism.

 

This soundscape encapsulates the sound of decay and destruction within this field. Field recordings taken during and after the demolition of The Dunston Rocket have been edited, layered and manipulated using a multitude of digital and analog methods creating a soundscape which encapsulates the sound of decline and destruction.

 

The decaying textures and industrial dirge aim to both represent and remember this landmark piece of architecture.

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Edgelands - Bleeding London project

Edgelands - Bleeding London project | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
I spent this morning finally getting round to properly start shooting for a group project I'm working on. Along with hundreds of other London photographers we are part of a project trying to photog...
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from occupy london to the suburbs, a journey with laura oldfield ford

from occupy london to the suburbs, a journey with laura oldfield ford | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Surbiton station isn’t the first place you’d expect to meet Laura Oldfield Ford. It is almost a decade since her zine Savage Messiah began garnering attention among the east London art crowd. Her post-subcultural blend of prose, drawings and collages seemed to flicker like pointed lights in the dusk of a city. There was a clear enemy: the “yuppies” moving into a Hackney once known for cheap rents and alternative culture but was becoming an area at the mercy of offshore landlords.
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Walking London, One Postcode at a Time

Walking London, One Postcode at a Time | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Inspired by “the Ladies who Bus” who are travelling London one bus route at a time, and building on the work I have done to become a walking tour guide, this blog is about walking London one postcode at a time. There are over 100 London postcode districts so that should keep me busy!

I decided to start in the SW postcodes because I realised that most of my working life has been in jobs based in SW1 and for all my adult life I have lived in SW postcodes. So I will walk first in the SW postcodes going in numerical order and work round London clockwise until I get to SE. Then I will go into the central ones of EC and WC. Who knows maybe after all that I will be strong enough to go through the outer postcodes like CR and RM. As you can see from the map, there is still quite a bit of Greater London which is outside the London post code area.

So a few grounds rules. I will aim to do a walk in each post  code area which features around ten places, buildings or stories of that area. As this is a postcode walk I will start at a post office, usually the main one. I reserve the right to hop on a bus or train if this makes for a better outcome. And for those few mainly central London postcodes which have sub divisions (eg SW1A, SW1Y etc) I am only covering this once (eg as SW1) in the part of my choosing!
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