Psychogeography
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Psychogeography
Walking & Wandering through Cities, Edgelands, Unplaces, Liminal Zones and Imaginary Worlds
Curated by Gareth Rees
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A Trilogy of Films About Hackney Marshes

A Trilogy of Films About Hackney Marshes | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

This trilogy documents the Lea Marshes and what ensues…

Breathe Wizard Breathe is a swirl of marsh dwellers (leafy mummers, car parks, tree spirits, pylons, goalposts) but ultimately a singular, omnipresent, character.

 

A thin veil is lifted to reveal: magic. Voyeurism....

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NEW TOWN UTOPIA | MODERN

NEW TOWN UTOPIA | MODERN | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
What happened when we built utopia?   New Town Utopia is a feature documentary that explores the noble but failed global experiment of ‘New Towns’ through the struggle of one British community to improve their lives through art and culture. New Town Utopia is Directed by Christopher Ian Smith and Executive Produced by Margaret Matheson (Sleep Furiously, Scum, Sid and Nancy).   We are currently in Production and due to start raising the funds for post-production through a crowdfunding campaign in
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Concrete and Caves

Concrete and Caves | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Concrete and Caves by Ally Standing Gravelly Hill Interchange: Birmingham’s most famous motorway junction and an important piece of structural history from the city’s period of modernist redevelopm...
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This 19th Century 'Stench Map' Shows How Smells Reshaped New York City

This 19th Century 'Stench Map' Shows How Smells Reshaped New York City | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Malodorous industries moved from Manhattan to Brooklyn, shifting the industrial landscape.

Via Kaeleigh Herstad
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Kaeleigh Herstad's curator insight, March 27, 6:13 PM

Via David Rotenstein and the Society for Industrial Archaeolgy

patrimodus's curator insight, March 28, 5:55 PM

Le bruit et l'odeur cartographiés

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Where Are London's Missing Map Traps? | Big Think

Where Are London's Missing Map Traps? | Big Think | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Haggerston, an area in the Borough of Hackney, northeast London, is notable for few things. For its Hackney City Farm. For its Haggerston School, designed by Ernö Goldfinger. For its long association with clowning [1].
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Shopfront Elegy

Shopfront Elegy | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
classic shops • signage • works • units • stalls • and more
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David Southwell on Twitter

David Southwell on Twitter | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Triple point score in psychogeography I-Spy for #pylon, flyover and the collapsed lung gasometer. pic.twitter.com/P3cEmKMmFB
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Dickens’s dark side: walking at night helped ease his conscience at killing off characters

Dickens’s dark side: walking at night helped ease his conscience at killing off characters | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Nightwalking: A Nocturnal History of London Matthew Beaumont Verso, pp.496, £20, ISBN: 9781781687956 In England, walking about at night was a crime for a very long time.
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Five Things I Learned on Cricklewood Broadway

Five Things I Learned on Cricklewood Broadway | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

One

Saturday morning, maybe half nine, wake to a hubbub outside the bedroom window. Down on the street the sound of a crowd, murmurings, overlapping conversations. Something going on.

 

Blearily peer through slatted blinds. Women in their Saturday best, men in sharp suits and yarmulkes, the old couple I see every day both bent by age into perfect L-shapes. Police advise a rabbi and stretch wasp-coloured tape across the road.

 

The local synagogue, evacuated, some phoned-in threat that I never knew the details of.

 

Later, Jubilee line down for line maintenance, we take the rail replacement bus toward Baker Street. At Cricklewood Broadway, the traffic slows to a syrupy pace. More police. Something going on, again.

 

Right-hand side of the road, dreadlocks, placards, young masked faces, UAF and Antifa chants. To my right, outnumbered even by the police who protected them, St George’s Crosses flapping in the wind, shouts of ‘we pay your taxes’ and ‘this place is harbouring terrorists’.

 

Never found out if the two events were linked.

 

Many months later, I switch on Channel 4 to watch Angry, White and Proud. I know that bloke, I say. He was there that day, on Cricklewood Broadway.

 

 

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Robert Macfarlane interview: A linguistic wander through Britain's wild landscapes - The Independent

Robert Macfarlane interview: A linguistic wander through Britain's wild landscapes - The Independent | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Only a few seconds into our tramp around the semi-rural "edgelands" south of Cambridge, and Robert Macfarlane has already spotted a mascot for the entire enterprise. A flash of brush vanishes into the scrubby chalk slope at the corner of our eyes.
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Another Place

Another Place | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

To reach Another Place you have to start in Liverpool. At least that is what we did, taking a Crosby-bound number 53 bus from the city’s Queen Square terminus.


Leaving the Victorian magnificence of the city centre behind, the route leads through the edgelands of north Liverpool, in sight of huge abandoned red-brick warehouses that fringe the wide silver Mersey below. Away from the revitalised city centre and the heritage revamping of Albert Dock, this is a zone of substandard housing and broken dreams; a place where most of the pubs are boarded up and semi-ruined now that the dockers who once would have drank in them no longer have wage packets to fritter. The whole area seems partly abandoned to buddleia and the memory of better days although, here and there, like red-brick phoenixes, are signs of identikit housing development: new-build semi-detached homes with small gardens and big aspirations.

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James Miller on Twitter

James Miller on Twitter | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Getting ready to lecture on #psychogeography & writing about place @Influxpress pic.twitter.com/GXH2IVAfBP
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Classic Cafes | Iain Sinclair

Classic Cafes | Iain Sinclair | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

"The word 'Psychogeography' comes from DeQuincey's wanderings, slightly druggy, no pattern, mapping out the city in a dream-like state. Then with Walter Benjamin and the Situationists the term becomes more extreme, a matter of taking very conceptual decisions about the walking you would do and how you would access the city like that.

I guess the idea flourished in the 60s. I thought it was a nice little franchise that you could reinvent in the 90s. Then it became a convenient way of describing something I'd being doing for donkey years.

I was born in Wales and there's a whole culture of classic Italian cafes there. Every town had one and the owners all came from the same place in Italy. Some were prisoners of war. A lot had settled in Bridge End...they worked on farms and married Welsh girls.

There were two major families who ran the whole thing. It was partly ice cream bars and partly cafes. The only social centre in each place used to be an Italian cafe.

But I like 'bastard' cafes - mongrelised ones, with bits and pieces strategically placed and altered. The main thing for me is the food - funnily enough I'm bothered about the food - placing and position too. I pick places on the perimeter of the city. That's where I walk. I don't go through London as such.

The classic type is an Anglicized version of the Italian, serving espressos, cappuccinos in Pyrex cups...but these bastard ones, they make their own adjustments.

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Walking's New Movement

Walking's New Movement | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

A book about developments in walking and walk-performance for enthusiasts, practitioners, students and academics.

In walking’s new movement  Phil Smith considers where things are at for walking (as art and as performance), psychogeography, and the use and abuse of public space - See more at: http://www.triarchypress.net/walkings-new-movement.html#sthash.YgEyVVPk.dpuf

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Brighton’s Unfinished Necropolis | Unofficial Britain.

Brighton’s Unfinished Necropolis | Unofficial Britain. | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

righton on a murky Easter Friday.

A spectral mist scrubs out the sea and tall landmarks, leaving visible only streets and gravestones.

It’s appropriate weather. I’m heading to a pub to listen to a live incarnation of The Séance, a ‘phantom seaside radio show’ helmed by Pete Wiggs and James Papademetrie.

On the way, my wife and I deviate through the gates of St Nicholas Rest Garden, lured in by mist and carved stone.

The garden was originally an extension cemetery for the nearby St Nicholas Church. It was opened in 1841 and used for burials until 1853, when public cholera controls came into effect. 

The original design by architect Amon Henry Wilds envisioned a burial pyramid for several thousand coffins and a row of 23 burial vaults. His idea was inspired by Thomas Willson’s plans in 1829 for a 94 storey burial pyramid in Primrose Hill, London.

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Nightwalking: a subversive stroll through the city streets

Nightwalking: a subversive stroll through the city streets | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Walking at night has always been the pursuit of the lost, the lonely, the deviant and dispossessed. Yet in today’s cities it can have a rebellious role
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Walking Inside Out: Contemporary British Psychogeography

Walking Inside Out: Contemporary British Psychogeography | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

Walking Inside Out is the first text that attempts to merge the work of literary and artist practitioners with academics to critically explore the state of psychogeography today. The collection explores contemporary psychogeographical practices, shows how a critical form of walking can highlight easily overlooked urban phenomenon, and examines the impact that everyday life in the city has on the individual. Through a variety of case studies, it offers a British perspective of international spaces, from the British metropolis to the post-communist European city. By situating the current strand of psychogeography within its historical, political and creative context along with careful consideration of the challenges it faces Walking Inside Out offers a vision for the future of the discipline.

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Lost Vegas: A Night Walk on Fremont Street | The Proto City

Lost Vegas: A Night Walk on Fremont Street | The Proto City | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Adam Nowek presents a photoessay of Fremont Street, the main gambling and entertainment district in the city Las Vegas.
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Britain’s Subterranean Ham Chambers & Why I Love My local Trophy Shop

Britain’s Subterranean Ham Chambers & Why I Love My local Trophy Shop | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

Almost every food-vending shop, supermarket, restaurant or café you’ll ever go into sells ham, or something with ham in it. In every village, town and city in Britain there’s ham, and lots of it, every day. There’s always ham. It never runs out. Then you have to start thinking about all the ham sold across the world every single second.

 

How can there be that much ham? How can it be always everywhere and in everything? Where are all the pigs? It seems like there should be pig farms spread across every inch of the countryside, just to keep the ham flowing.

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Liam Young's animations of dystopian future cities

Liam Young's animations of dystopian future cities | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Liam Young of architecture thinktank Tomorrow's Thoughts Today has developed a series of animated panoramas depicting potential cities of the future.
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The Idea of a River: Walking out of Berlin

The Idea of a River: Walking out of Berlin | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

The fisherman sits on a squat stool, rod resting on a stand between his legs, his hat pulled over his head. He looks at peace, eyes cast forward across the calm waters of the canal, his thermos flask of coffee on one side, a cool box filled with supplies on the other. I can see him an hour or so earlier, stepping out from his nearby apartment, walking along the river to his regular patch on the canal bank. He’s been coming here for years, since a time when no-one came to this corner of the city, when the neighbourhood was enclosed by the Wall and he could feel the eyes of the East German border guards on his back…

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Brutal but Beautiful: Book of 88 WWII Coastal Military Ruins

Brutal but Beautiful: Book of 88 WWII Coastal Military Ruins | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Traveling 23,000 miles over 4 years, photographer Marc Wilson has amassed an amazing collection of images spanning bunkers, gun emplacements, observation posts, command centres and other wartime in...
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Crow

Crow | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

I noticed the two women staring at the building opposite. I heard a crow and saw the shape of one perched on a high sill. It was still, with its beak open. I stood with the women and we watched for a minute, two minutes, three minutes. The bird did not twitch. Beak open. The women agreed that it wasn't real. I agreed with them. Very realistic. I went into a shop. When I came out a few minutes later the crow was jumping around on the sill. Perhaps the things we dismiss as inauthentic are things we have not given enough time to yet.


Via Mythogeography
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Stranger With Friction: HOOKLAND the PHOENIX GUIDE TO STRANGE ENGLAND, COUNTY BY COUNTY as RECOUNTED BY DAVID SOUTHWELL

Stranger With Friction: HOOKLAND the PHOENIX GUIDE TO STRANGE ENGLAND, COUNTY BY COUNTY as RECOUNTED BY DAVID SOUTHWELL | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
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Old Indifferent Phil

Old Indifferent Phil | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

I used to think this street was dodgy, and when I heard about its history, it only confirmed it more.


Walking down it to work or on a night on the town in my twenties or coming back from school (in my teens), it’s a part of Basingstoke that fits in with ‘Edgelands’ thinking. It has a cycle lane, a private Health clinic, a small housing development, tree surgeons, and a field (owned by the Council) that runs alongside the railway line. There is woodland here. For people living in Old Basing and Lychpit, suburbs and ‘villages’ of Basingstoke, this walking path is what leads you to the town centre.


The pretentious early twenties me used to want to blend some psychogeographical historical-crime novel, inspired by half reading David Seabrook, David Peace and Iain Sinclair, out of this strange part of Basingstoke.

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