Psychogeography
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Psychogeography
Walking & Wandering through Cities, Edgelands, Unplaces, Liminal Zones and Imaginary Worlds
Curated by Gareth Rees
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The Überpanopticon | Unofficial Britain.

The Überpanopticon | Unofficial Britain. | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

Terry Farrell’s MI6 building, aka 85 Vauxhall Cross, occupies a major traffic intersection beside the arterial A202 road over Vauxhall Bridge.

Such crossroads have long been renowned as places of decision-making and thus fatefulness. Speaking of the French poet Charles Baudelaire, Margery A. Evans in her study Baudelaire and Intertextuality: Poetry at the Crossroads (1993) addresses their significance, remarking that “It is tempting to read in Baudelaire’s metaphor of the ‘carrefour’, an implicit recognition of what we would nowadays term intertextuality and of the seamless continuity of world and text.”

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Imaginary London, a talk by Darran Anderson author of Imaginary Cities

Darran Anderson talking about Imaginary London - architecture that was never made, ideas for the city that never came to pass, the influence of comic books and science fiction on the city.

To buy Darran's book visit Influx Press: http://www.influxpress.com/imaginary-cities

"poetic, aphoristic and comprising a seeming infinity of quotable lines." - The Chicago Tribune.
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Particulations: Let’s Talk About What People Don’t Like About Psychogeography – Part 1

Particulations: Let’s Talk About What People Don’t Like About Psychogeography – Part 1 | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

So as to keep up-to-date with any current media-related references to psychogeography, from time to time I type into my search engine ‘psychogeography’ followed by the month and year. In April 2014 I did the same and an article in the The Guardian paired psychogeography with the name of a Britpop singer: ‘Damon Albarn and the Heavy Seas Review – Rich in Personal Psychogeography’ (2014). If Coverley thought ‘the game was up’ following Self’s articles in The Independent, I wonder what this says about psychogeography today? Even though it could be easy to be cynical about its current populist and mutable use, this is not a particularly constructive approach to take towards psychogeography. Rather than seeing it as a co-opting of the term, or an aligning of some individuals to something ‘trendy’ that we feel they have little connection to, we might see this as a compliment.

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Shingle Street: Suffolk's fortified coastscape.

Shingle Street: Suffolk's fortified coastscape. | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
On Sunday 18th January, I had the pleasure of attending the private viewing of Frank Watson's Soundings from the Estuary at the M2 Gallery in Peckham. A fairly low-key event, there were a small num...
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The big empty

The big empty | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

So this was how it was going to go: Culham to Reading, staying overnight in Wallingford. Two days along England’s alimentary canal. Two days running with Eliot’s ‘strong brown god’. Two days of summer dancing.

 

Culham station was a void. A four-quarters emptiness. Once part of a working network, it now obeyed a dead logic. It was out on its own, unmoored. Nothing moved. Nobody waited. Nobody got off but us. The pub next-door offered bed and breakfast, but who for? For a time we walked in hot circles, trying to find our way out of the station’s magnetic circle. Eventually we walked up and out, into the thick-phallus shadows of Didcot power station, a henge at the centre of the day’s circuit. From the crest of the station’s well we passed along a trunk road, heavy with willowherb and knapweed, down to the Thames and a different emptiness.

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Marc Renshaw on Twitter

Marc Renshaw on Twitter | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
The Parc - Map 3
#map #psychogeography #art #drawing #digital #geography #memory #Capital #business #CEO #finance pic.twitter.com/ip2ZKQOkXB
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Why plotting a sound map of London is impossible

Why plotting a sound map of London is impossible | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
The opening bars of Ralph Vaughan Williams’s A London Symphony (1914) are scooped out from the gloopy bedrock of the city. Vaughan Williams was dredging through the same mud, silt,… Read more
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Tryweryn: the Story of a Valley [1965]

Tryweryn: the Story of a Valley [1965] | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

'The local school is closed, the chapel celebrates its last wedding, furniture that has stood in farmhouses for centuries is removed, graves are dug up and re-located. Thus did the Tryweryn Valley and the village of Capel Celyn become one vast reservoir via an Act of Parliament that allowed Liverpool City Council to proceed with the creation of its new water supply despite the opposition of every Welsh MP bar one.

 

The Tryweryn Bill allowed Liverpool City Council to by-pass obtaining planning consent from the relevant local authorities. Wales’ powerlessness was exposed and protests involved members of the Free Wales Army and Mudiad Amddiffyn Cymru. Pupils and staff of Friars School in Bangor filmed the demolition and construction work from start to finish and have produced what might have been regarded as an objective record of an emotive event. The school concludes that the reservoir has enhanced the natural beauty of the area and that it will attract tourists “to enjoy the sailing and fishing on these once troubled waters."'


Via Sean Albiez
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Sean Albiez's curator insight, July 13, 2:38 PM

With thanks to Laura Denning for drawing my attention to this.

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Along The Outskirts: Walk 7: Milton Folly to New Covert

Along The Outskirts: Walk 7: Milton Folly to New Covert | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

A relatively untouched area of the city sits beneath the Fletton Parkway and Orton Southgate. Saying untouched is perhaps misleading, as the area has clearly been used and re-used by man for farming and mining for centuries. An old Roman road called Ermine Street, even runs down one side of the area now subsumed by the A1 (M).
Presently, this north-westerly corner of the city contains a line of soft estate woodland, a small  (fenced off) lake, Milton Folly, Alwalton hill, a few small coverts of woodland and a set of fields. The most dramatic elements of the area are the two earth formations and a large area of hills and holes which are the site of the disused Orton clay pits. Widlife thrives in this area, and it is watched over by the odd bird of prey, that circles the hillocks and ponds.

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The Library: Scarp, by Nick Papadimitriou

The Library: Scarp, by Nick Papadimitriou | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

On the north Middlesex/south Hertfordshire border sits a 17-mile escarpment. This ridge, part of London’s outward-growing suburbs, is an unremarkable place of motorways, council flats and gas stations. And yet for over 20 years Nick Papadimitriou has made it his playground, his emotional and topographical heartland. Two decades of mental and physical exploration have provided him with all the material he needs to write an extraordinary book about the escarpment, or as he calls it, ‘Scarp’.

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The Parc: multimedia interrogation of a transitional zone by Marc Renshaw

The Parc: multimedia interrogation of a transitional zone by Marc Renshaw | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

I’ve a longstanding interest in non–places and transitional zones including motorway services, airports and business parks. My local research point is the Europarc and its surrounding environs. This site is ten minutes drive from my rural home.

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Abbey Motor Hotel | Abandoned Britain - Photographing Ruins

Abbey Motor Hotel | Abandoned Britain - Photographing Ruins | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
RT ParlonsRosbif: Abbey Motor Hotel | Abandoned Britain - Photographing Ruins http://t.co/JO0d1q8xRF  #leicester http://t.co/UgV5ItaUyb

Via Laura Brown
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Waste products in the back passage

Waste products in the back passage | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
I have drawn my garden and my street so many times I can’t generate any enthusiasm for yet another try – whereas the back alley is virgin territory – as far as sketching goes, I mean. It certainly ...
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Common Ground: Rob Cowen on Edgeland Literature, Psychogeography & Nature Writing

Common Ground: Rob Cowen on Edgeland Literature, Psychogeography & Nature Writing | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

I recently spoke to Rob Cowen, author of the excellent Common Ground, about his new book, edgeland literature and psychogeography, the debates around what does and does not constitute ‘nature writing’ and the importance of writing in re-engaging people with place.

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Iain Sinclair London Overground / Black Apples interview - YouTube

Author Iain Sinclair talking about his recent books London Overground and Black Apples of Gower. Interview by John Rogers July 2015. Please subscribe for reg...
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Swanscombe: marginal narrations of a marshland

Swanscombe: marginal narrations of a marshland | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Having been lucky enough to catch the last day of the Swanscombe Project exhibition at the Blake Gallery in Gravesend earlier this year, I was inspired to then spend a rather dreary Sunday afternoo...
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Wetherspoons Carpets: A Field Study

Wetherspoons Carpets: A Field Study | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

JD Wetherspoons is the Brahma, Vishnuand Shiva of British booze. The creator, preserver and destroyer of pub culture. The great trinity of cheap drinks, pub snacks and fruit machines. Curry Clubs, Steak Tuesdays, Mixed Grills and pints of Tuborg for £2.49.

 

I love and hate Wetherspoons in equal measure. I hate its dominance on the high street and its early tactics of under cutting genuine local establishments and putting them out of business. I love the fact that I can still buy a pint in London for £2.49. I hate that they don’t play music. I love the mix of people you get inside – a genuine cross section of the local area. I hate the lighting.

 

I love the carpets.

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What happens after? Thoughts on dark real estate, legal psychogeography and bunker-pooh.

What happens after? Thoughts on dark real estate, legal psychogeography and bunker-pooh. | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Back in the bunker So, I’m standing in the sparse canteen, sipping a glass of something fizzy. My neighbour turns to me and we exchange names. Then there’s a pause. She looks at me quizzically. ‘Yo...
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Walking Inside Out: Contemporary British Psychogeography - out now!

Walking Inside Out: Contemporary British Psychogeography - out now! | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Walking Inside Out: Contemporary British Psychogeography is now available on the publishers website:Rowman and Littlefield International. Here is an overview of the book: 
Walking Inside Out is the first text that attempts to merge the work of literary and artist practitioners with academics to critically explore the state of psychogeography today. The collection explores contemporary psychogeographical practices, shows how a critical form of walking can highlight easily overlooked urban phenomenon, and examines the impact that everyday life in the city has on the individual. Through a variety of case studies, it offers a British perspective of international spaces, from the British metropolis to the post-communist European city. By situating the current strand of psychogeography within its historical, political and creative context along with careful consideration of the challenges it faces Walking Inside Out offers a vision for the future of the discipline.
 
Gareth Rees's insight:

I'm honoured and delighted to have written a chapter of this book. Well worth reading - some great essays in here. 

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Mock Rock in Ramsgate

Mock Rock in Ramsgate | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

I was on a trip to Ramsgate with the kids at the weekend.

Approaching the harbour from the west I found myself walking down the B2054, otherwise known as the Royal Parade, an elevated road built into the cliff-side.

 

It was an impressive descent. While ignoring the awful high-pitched wailing from my youngest daughter, I passed a sequence of grand, redbrick arches packed with bulging rock strata. Foliage burst from the cracks. Patches of wet slime were dark against the grey. Gigantic pot plants were arranged in some of the recesses.

 

A perfect fusion of geology and human engineering. Very pretty too.

Except all was not as it seemed…

 

This was mock rock. An artificial composite known as Pulhamite, invented by James Pulham (1820–98).

 

What I was looking at was a Victorian version of the geological past.

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Towards a Taxonomy of Edgelands Literature

Towards a Taxonomy of Edgelands Literature | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

Susan Sontag, in her 1969 work Styles of Radical Will, claimed that ‘there is no such thing as empty space. As long as a human eye is looking there is always something to see’ (10) – foreseeing with the simplicity of her statement a watershed moment in literary and cultural criticism, the spatial turn, the effects of which are still being comprehended and incorporated into the discourse of cultural theory today.

 

As criticism focused its ‘human eye’ upon spatiality, certain spaces – much as certain temporalities in the long nineteenth century – were privileged above the rest. Others have needed to wait until the turn of the twenty-first century to gain their share of critical attention, edgelands chief among them.

 

While the edgelands – the liminal zones where both city and rural fringe end – have recently gained a popular cachet, a critical understanding of their worth and cultural impact remains underdeveloped. This article argues that it is timely to promote a more holistic understanding of the edgelands in contemporary literature, and in so doing, to map the ever-shifting borders of a subversive, contemporary genre.

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Lost in a Landscape - Vanishing Point: Fricourt New

Lost in a Landscape - Vanishing Point: Fricourt New | Psychogeography | Scoop.it

The best and worst of it all are hidden over a brow....

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Following the Falling Water

Following the Falling Water | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
  .   .             ≈≈≈   . . ≈≈≈ .   ≈≈≈       Images taken from a short walk on the Water of Leith, between the Scottish National ...
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Psychogeographer’s Guide : Brum 2015

Psychogeographer’s Guide : Brum 2015 | Psychogeography | Scoop.it
Traversing Birmingham city centre on foot is, currently, no simple feat. 2015 sees the demolition of John Madin’s Central Library and the redevelopment of Paradise Place, a complete renovation of B...
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