Medicine and Psychiatry
3.3K views | +2 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini from Mental Health & Emotional Wellness
onto Medicine and Psychiatry
Scoop.it!

7 Questions People Who See A Shrink Are Tired Of Hearing

7 Questions People Who See A Shrink Are Tired Of Hearing | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

My best friend and I are constantly playing phone tag. But there's one person who promises to have my undivided attention once a week, no matter what: Dr. R, my therapist. For the past 2.5 years, we have spent 55 minutes every Tuesday evening together, and for that, I'm grateful. My adventures in therapy began during my sophomore year in college, when I walked into my campus's mental health center after a close friend suffered a mental breakdown. We were so alike that I knew that if I didn't do something, my fate would be similar. Now, five years later, I consider that decision the best choice I've ever made. Just as many of us indulge in weekly nail salon trips to keep up our appearance, therapy sessions are essential to my emotional upkeep. But once I started being open with family, friends, and even acquaintances about going to therapy, I started to realize there are more than a few misconceptions out there about it. Here are some of the dumbest things I've heard people say to me about therapy and the actual truths about what really happens behind the white noise machine.


Via Dr. Amy Fuller
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Way too few people take advantage of psychotherapy, often because of various misconceptions and worries that they will appear "weak".

more...
No comment yet.
Medicine and Psychiatry
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Here's A Strikingly Effective Way To Help You Get Over Your Phobias

Here's A Strikingly Effective Way To Help You Get Over Your Phobias | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

There’s plenty of psychological research to back up the idea that facing a phobia can be the best way to get over it. But all the evidence in the world doesn’t necessarily make it easier to cozy up to, say, the spider that causes your pulse to quicken. Researchers may have found something that helps: a computer program that very quickly flashes images of whatever it is that freaks you out. While the images go by so fast that you don’t consciously recognize what you’re seeing, your brain processes the pictures and becomes slightly less afraid. 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Subliminal messaging used to treat phobic disorders.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Using the pill can protect women from certain cancers 'for up to 30 years'

Using the pill can protect women from certain cancers 'for up to 30 years' | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Women who have taken the contraceptive pill are protected from some types of cancer for as long as 30 years after they stopped taking it, according to new research. Those who have used the pill “during their reproductive years” are less likely to have bowel cancer, endometrial cancer or ovarian cancer than women who had never taken it, a study at the University of Aberdeen found. Researchers also looked at the risk of all types of cancer in women who have taken the pill during their reproductive years and found it does not lead to new cancer risks later in life. The results are the latest published from the longest-running study in the world into the effects of taking the contraceptive pill.

 

However, the pill is also linked to increased risk of depression: 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/oct/03/pill-linked-depression-doctors-hormonal-contraceptives?CMP=share_btn_tw

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

From data compiled over 44 years, researchers found women were protected from bowel, endometrial and ovarian cancer by taking the contraceptive pill.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

The Pill Should Be Over-the-Counter, Experts Conclude

The Pill Should Be Over-the-Counter, Experts Conclude | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

For the review, the Johns Hopkins-led team looked for teen-specific data related to the safety and effectiveness of oral contraceptives, pregnancy risk associated with typical use of various forms of contraception, teen ability to use oral contraceptives correctly and consistently, the impact of OTC access on sexual behaviors, and concerns that OTC access might reduce clinician counseling opportunities with young people.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

After reviewing decades of published studies, a team of pediatric, adolescent and women's health experts concludes that regulatory, behavioral and scientific evidence supports switching oral contraceptives from prescription-only status to over-the-counter availability.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

First UK licence to create three-person baby granted by fertility regulator

First UK licence to create three-person baby granted by fertility regulator | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
IVF technique uses DNA from three people to prevent genetic diseases being passed on, and could be offered by Newcastle clinic from this summer
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Doctors in the UK have been granted permission to use the three-person baby fertility technique to prevent incurable genetic diseases being inherited by children.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Blueberries virtually eliminate baby blues, experts say

Blueberries virtually eliminate baby blues, experts say | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
They are already considered a super-food.But now it seems that blueberries may have another brilliant benefit - by blocking the cause of so-called baby blues. A new study found that the fruit's amino acids, tryptophan and tyrosine, can compensate for the surge in a protein after giving birth, which cuts the level of ‘feel-good hormones’ in the brain.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Blueberry amino acids, tryptophan and tyrosine, found to compensate for post-natal protein surge.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

How does your diet impact mental health?

How does your diet impact mental health? | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Government figures show more than 16 million American adults report having a major episode of depression in the past year. Women are affected more often than men. A new field of study, nutritional psychiatry, looks at how diet can improve mental health. Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the findings.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

What IF you could exchange that Prozac with a nutritious meal? Ask you doctor if healthy and nutritious food is right for you!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Young people 'fear stigma' if they ask for mental-health help

Young people 'fear stigma' if they ask for mental-health help | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Almost half of 2,215 16- to 25-year-olds polled by YouGov for the Prince's Trust said they had themselves experienced a mental health problem. And a third of these felt admitting to problems could harm their job chances. Fear of stigma was a "major obstacle" to finding help, said Prof Louise Arseneault, of Kings College London. A third of the young people sampled also said they would worry about appearing weak if they sought help, and most said they would not want to confide in anyone at all.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Over three-quarters of young people say there is a stigma to mental illness and a quarter would not ask for help if they were suffering, a survey suggests.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Patients More Likely To Refuse Drug Therapy Than Psychotherapy For Mental Health

Patients More Likely To Refuse Drug Therapy Than Psychotherapy For Mental Health | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Individuals already on drug therapy also more likely to discontinue treatment early, study says
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

People seeking help for mental disorders are more likely to refuse or not complete the recommended treatment if it involves only psychotropic drugs, according to a review of research published by the American Psychological Association.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Researchers say depression as bad for the heart as obesity and cholesterol

Researchers say depression as bad for the heart as obesity and cholesterol | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Depression poses a risk for cardiovascular diseases in men that is just as great as that posed by high cholesterol levels and obesity. This is according to a report recently published in the 'Atherosclerosis' journal by researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München, together with colleagues from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Center for Cardiovascular Disease (DZHK).
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Investigation shows that the risk of a fatal cardiovascular disease due to depression is almost as great as that due to elevated cholesterol levels or obesity.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Ketamine Eases Severe Depression, But Questions of Dosage and Duration Remain

Ketamine Eases Severe Depression, But Questions of Dosage and Duration Remain | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Recent studies have confirmed observations made by Yale clinicians decades ago — the anesthetic ketamine provides rapid and robust relief to those suffering from the most severe forms of depression. However, there is also limited research to advise doctors on best doses and length of ketamine treatment, which patients will most benefit from treatment, and whether ketamine can provide long-lasting relief for depression without dangerous side effects, according to a report published March 1 in the Journal JAMA Psychiatry.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

New Jama Psychiatry paper confirms that the anesthetic ketamine provides rapid and robust relief to those suffering from the most severe forms of depression. However, more research needed to guide clinicians.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Trump: 'Nobody knew health care could be so complicated'

Trump: 'Nobody knew health care could be so complicated' | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

President Donald Trump noted with some exasperation Monday the complexity of the nation's health laws, which he's vowed to reform as part of a bid to scrap Obamacare."We have come up with a solution that's really, really I think very good," Trump said at a meeting of the nation's governors at the White House. "Now, I have to tell you, it's an unbelievably complex subject," he added. "Nobody knew health care could be so complicated."

 

Watch:

Obamacare: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEGpriv2TAc

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Healthcare?? Complicated???

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Depression top cause of disability, strikes young and old: WHO

Depression top cause of disability, strikes young and old: WHO | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

More than 4 percent of the world's population lives with depression, and women, youth and the elderly are the most prone to its disabling effects, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday. An estimated 322 million people suffered depressive disorders in 2015, a rise of 18.4 percent in a decade, as people live longer, the United Nations agency said in a report.

 

See the report:

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/254610/1/WHO-MSD-MER-2017.2-eng.pdf?ua=1

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Depression Is Now The ‘Leading Cause Of Disability Worldwide’, WHO Reports.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Allen Frances on Trump’s Mental State

Allen Frances on Trump’s Mental State | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Fevered media speculation about Donald Trump’s psychological motivations and psychiatric diagnosis has recently encouraged mental health professionals to disregard the usual ethical constraints against diagnosing public figures at a distance. They have sponsored several petitions and a Feb. 14 letter to The New York Times suggesting that Mr. Trump is incapable, on psychiatric grounds, of serving as president. Most amateur diagnosticians have mislabeled President Trump with the diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder. I wrote the criteria that define this disorder, and Mr. Trump doesn’t meet them. He may be a world-class narcissist, but this doesn’t make him mentally ill, because he does not suffer from the distress and impairment required to diagnose mental disorder.

 

See also:

 

Is It Time to Call Trump Mentally Ill? https://nyti.ms/2ldQE3M

 

Is Donald Trump Mentally Ill? 3 Professors Of Psychiatry Ask President Obama To Conduct 'A Full Medical And Neuropsychiatric Evaluation' http://www.huffingtonpost.com/richard-greene/is-donald-trump-mentally_b_13693174.html?ncid=engmodushpmg00000004

 

Mental Health Professionals Warn About Trump https://nyti.ms/2kDacxm

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

It is a stigmatizing insult to the mentally ill (who are mostly well behaved and well meaning) to be lumped with Mr. Trump (who is neither). Bad behavior is rarely a sign of mental illness, and the mentally ill behave badly only rarely. Psychiatric name-calling is a misguided way of countering Mr. Trump’s attack on democracy. He can, and should, be appropriately denounced for his ignorance, incompetence, impulsivity and pursuit of dictatorial powers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Phone device tests male fertility with 98% accuracy

Phone device tests male fertility with 98% accuracy | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
The new technology -- consisting of an external accessory in which sperm samples are inserted and an app that analyzes them -- could make testing as straightforward as a home pregnancy test, the scientists say.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A new smartphone attachment can evaluate a man's semen and determine his level of fertility with up to 98% accuracy, a new study has showed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Risk of Premature Death May Be Highest in Year Following Psychiatric Hospital Discharge

Risk of Premature Death May Be Highest in Year Following Psychiatric Hospital Discharge | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
The study highlights the need for clinicians to work together to monitor and support patients shortly after a psychiatric hospitalization discharge. 
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A study using danish registry data published in JAMA Psychiatry finds that the first year following discharge may mark a period of increased risk of premature death from both natural and unnatural causes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Scientists publish groundbreaking study on new drug to restore heart function after a heart attack

Scientists publish groundbreaking study on new drug to restore heart function after a heart attack | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Cardiovascular disease is the world's leading killer, taking the lives of 17.5 million people annually, according to the World Health Organization, and disabling millions more. Currently, no drug exists to restore heart muscle function after a heart attack. "The potential impact of MSI-1436 is enormous," MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Viravuth P. Yin, Ph.D., one of the paper's authors, said. "If it shows similar results in humans, it will be a game-changer for patients who suffer a heart attack and/or are living with heart disease."

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Scientists have identified a drug candidate to restore heart muscle function following a heart attack. Currently, no drug exists to restore heart muscle function after a heart attack.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Calls for ibuprofen sale restrictions after study finds cardiac arrest risk

Calls for ibuprofen sale restrictions after study finds cardiac arrest risk | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

There have been fresh calls for restrictions on the sale of the painkiller ibuprofen after another study found it heightens the risk of cardiac arrest. Taking the over-the-counter drug was associated with a 31% increased risk, researchers in Denmark found. Other medicines from the same group of painkillers, known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), presented an even higher risk, according to the findings published on Wednesday in the European Heart Journal.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Over-the-counter drug linked to 31% increased cardiac arrest risk, with the figure rising to 50% for diclofenac, says Danish research.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Brain Imaging Identifies Different Types of Depression

Brain Imaging Identifies Different Types of Depression | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Biological markers could enable tailored therapies that target individual differences in symptoms
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Research published in Nature Medicine seems to point toward a long-sought goal in psychiatry—biological markers to distinguish different kinds of depression.

more...
4Locum's curator insight, March 14, 3:42 PM

Research published in Nature Medicine seems to point toward a long-sought goal in psychiatry—biological markers to distinguish different kinds of depression.

Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Vaccines do work for pandemic flu, says study

Vaccines do work for pandemic flu, says study | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Vaccines are successful in preventing pandemic flu and reducing the number of patients hospitalised as a result of the illness, a study led by academics at The University of Nottingham has found.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

The vaccines produced against the swine flu pandemic in 2009 were very effective in both preventing influenza infection and reducing the chances of hospital admission due to flu. This is all very encouraging in case we encounter a future pandemic, perhaps one that is more severe. Of course, it took five to six months for pandemic vaccines to be ready in large quantities; this was a separate problem. However, if we can speed up vaccine production times, we would have a very effective strategy to reduce the impact of a future flu pandemic.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Financial ties between researchers and drug industry linked to positive trial results

Financial ties between researchers and drug industry linked to positive trial results | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Relationships with industry are common among investigators of randomised clinical trials (RCTs) - raising concerns about the effect that financial ties may have on the evidence base. But studies investigating these relationships have been conflicting.
So a team of US based researchers set out to investigate the association between financial ties of principal investigators and study outcomes in a random sample of 195 drug trials published in 2013. They focused on trials that examined the effectiveness of drugs, because these studies have a high impact on both clinical practice and healthcare costs. More than half (58%) of principal investigators had financial ties to the drug industry - including travel expenses, honorariums, payment for advisory work, or stock ownership. The results show that trials authored by principal investigators with financial ties to drug manufacturers were more likely than other trials to report favourable results.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Financial ties between researchers and companies that make the drugs they are studying are independently associated with positive trial results, suggesting bias in the evidence base, concludes a BMJ study.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Children of depressed mothers at risk for unintentional injuries

Children of depressed mothers at risk for unintentional injuries | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
The rates of child poisonings, small fractures and minor burns increased during these episodes – with poisonings more than doubled when mothers suffered both depression and anxiety - but there was no link to more severe injuries such as third-degree burns or femur fractures, researchers found.“Maternal depression and anxiety are common. Maternal well-being is key to giving children a good start in life, affecting their emotional and physical health,” said lead author Ruth Baker of the University of Nottingham.“Injuries are still one of the leading preventable causes of death in preschool children, yet few studies have examined whether maternal mental illnesses affect that risk,” she told Reuters Health by email. “Most studies focus on depression alone.”
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Children under age 5 are more likely to accidentally get injured if their mothers are having a depression or anxiety episode, according to a study in the UK.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Artificial 'embryos' created in the lab

Artificial 'embryos' created in the lab | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
The University of Cambridge team used two types of stem cells and a 3D scaffold to create a structure closely resembling a natural mouse embryo. Previous attempts have had limited success because early embryo development requires the different cells to coordinate with each other. The researchers hope their work will help improve fertility treatments.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Scientists have created "artificial embryos" using stem cells from mice, in what they believe is a world first.

more...
4Locum's curator insight, March 4, 4:08 PM

Scientists have created "artificial embryos" using stem cells from mice, in what they believe is a world first.

Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

WHO releases list of world's most dangerous superbugs

WHO releases list of world's most dangerous superbugs | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
“Antibiotic resistance is growing and we are running out of treatment options. If we leave it to market forces alone, the new antibiotics we most urgently need are not going to be developed in time,” said Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, the WHO’s assistant director-general for health systems and innovation.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

For the first time ever, the World Health Organization has drawn up a list of the highest priority needs for new antibiotics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Very premature babies at risk of mental health problems

Very premature babies at risk of mental health problems | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Children who are born very prematurely are at greater risk of developing mental health and social problems that can persist well into adulthood, according to one of the largest reviews of evidence. Those with an extremely low birth weight, at less than a kilogram, are more likely to have attention disorders and social difficulties as children, and feel more shyness, anxiety and depression as adults, than those born a healthy weight. The review draws on findings from 41 published studies over the past 26 years and highlights the need for doctors to follow closely how children born very prematurely fare as they become teenagers and adults.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Studies reveal greater likelihood of attention disorders, shyness and anxiety in childhood and then adulthood for survivors with very low birth weight of 1kg.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ziggi Ivan Santini
Scoop.it!

Hallucinations Are Much More Common Than We Think

Hallucinations Are Much More Common Than We Think | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

When certain experiences fall outside of societal norms, people tend to keep their personal events to themselves. For instance, you probably don’t hear people walking down the street talking about their hallucinations as candidly as they do, say, their dreams. But new research has found that the former is actually much more common among the general population than most people realize.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Study examining over 7,400 people in the UK discovers that 4.3% of participants report having experienced visual or auditory hallucinations in the past year, including people without mental disorders, confirming that the phenomenon is not limited to people with psychosis.

more...
No comment yet.