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Changing brains: why neuroscience is ending the Prozac era

Changing brains: why neuroscience is ending the Prozac era | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it
The big money has moved from developing psychiatric drugs to manipulating our brain networks, writes Vaughan Bell

Via Sandeep Gautam
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

This is either exceedingly good news or extremely dangerous...

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:57 AM

systems neuroscience: the new dinner table topic.

Joe Stafura's curator insight, September 23, 2013 10:30 AM

The pharma business is just one of the many areas where the new understanding of the brain changes the options; education, economics and policy development and business management are all areas that will be disrupted over the next decade. The greatest inertia to overcome is the desire of many to cling to superstitious or profitable scams that are attractive but ineffective except in the creation of profits.

Venitta Lateer's comment, September 25, 2013 8:09 PM
You need to look into what is called Non-Leathal, it is used by the Police & Military it cab do all that and much more, I can not look into it, myself, as i am under a investigation, and they make sure that I can not get a hold of dam near anything i need, that is unless it has the ability to make me look crazy or paranoid, thus your post, lol. But if you really want to do that kind of thing, and work, you really should look into Non-Leathal

Your article was AWESOME !!! Posted it on Facebook :)
P.S. NO I do not think that you are in on ANYTHING with the FBI over my case, they just make sure that I find things like this, lol, Sigh :(
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The most important lesson from 83,000 brain scans

Change your Brain, Change your Life. Revelations based on studying brain images across 90 countries over 20 years. How Brain imaging can change paradigms and our understanding of healthy life, no matter where we live. Physician, psychiatrist, and teacher, Daniel Amen, MD, is one of the world's foremost experts on applying brain imaging science to clinical psychiatric practice. He is widely regarded as a gifted teacher, taking complex brain science concepts to make them easily accessible to other professionals and the general public. Daniel is the author of 42 professional articles and 28 books, including four New York Times bestsellers. He is the producer and star of five highly popular shows about the brain, which have raised more than 34 million dollars for public television. Daniel is the medical director of Amen Clinics, Inc., that has the world's largest database of functional brain scans.

 

See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLKj1puoWCg

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Change the psychiatric model by looking at the brain & demanding insurance coverage of advanced imaging technology!

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Anti-anxiety drugs could raise risk for Alzheimer's

Anti-anxiety drugs could raise risk for Alzheimer's | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Long-term use of some common anti-anxiety and insomnia drugs may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease later in life. According to a new study, regular use of benzodiazepines -- which include medications such as Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), Xanax (alprazolam) and Klonopin (clonazepam) -- is associated with as much as a 51 percent increased risk for Alzheimer's among people who use the drugs for three months or more.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"Regular use of benzodiazepines -- which include medications such as Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), Xanax (alprazolam) and Klonopin (clonazepam) -- is associated with as much as a 51 percent increased risk for Alzheimer's among people who use the drugs for three months or more... Experts recommend older patients not use these drugs for longer than three months. Benzodiazepines can be highly addictive, and their sedative effect means many patients become reliant on them as sleeping aids.... It is now crucial to encourage physicians to carefully balance the benefits and risks when initiating or renewing a treatment with benzodiazepines and related products in elderly patients."

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Lesbian, gay and bisexual people more likely to experience poor mental health, report claims

Lesbian, gay and bisexual people more likely to experience poor mental health, report claims | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Lesbian, gay and bisexual men and women in England are more likely to report having long-standing mental health problems than their heterosexual counterparts, which could in part be down to the stigma they experience, researchers have claimed. Sexual minorities were 2-3 times more likely to report having a longstanding psychological or emotional problem than their heterosexual counterparts, according to researchers from the RAND Corporation, University of Cambridge, and Harvard Medical School. Nearly 11% of gay men and 15% of bisexual men reported such a problem, compared with 5% of heterosexual men. Similarly, just over 12% of lesbian women and almost 19% of bisexual women reported problems compared with 6% of heterosexual women.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

People with deviant sexual orientations at risk for mental ill-health. Perhaps not a surprise to most.

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First WHO report on suicide prevention: calls for coordinated action to reduce suicides worldwide

First WHO report on suicide prevention: calls for coordinated action to reduce suicides worldwide | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

WHO calls for coordinated action to reduce suicides worldwide. More than 800 000 people die by suicide every year – around one person every 40 seconds, according to WHO’s first global report on suicide prevention, published today. Suicide occurs all over the world and can take place at almost any age. Globally, suicide rates are highest in people aged 70 years and over. In some countries, however, the highest rates are found among the young. Notably, suicide is the second leading cause of death in 15-29 year-olds globally. “This report is a call for action to address a large public health problem which has been shrouded in taboo for far too long” said Dr Margaret Chan, Director-General of WHO.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

It's great to see so much progress in this area.

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Overactive Immune System May Be Linked to Mental Illness Risk

Overactive Immune System May Be Linked to Mental Illness Risk | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

The immune system may play a vital role in the development of mental illness, according to new research published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. The study shows that children with regularly high levels of a protein released in the blood during an infection are at greater risk of developing depression and psychosis as adults.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

“Our immune system acts like a thermostat, turned down low most of the time, but cranked up when we have an infection. In some people, the thermostat is always set slightly higher, behaving as if they have a persistent low level infection — these people appear to be at a higher risk of developing depression and psychosis.”

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Denmark Paves The Way For Animal Fuckers

Denmark Paves The Way For Animal Fuckers | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Bestiality is having a weird renaissance in Europe. Perhaps ironically, it kicked off when activists succeeded in banning the practice in places like Germany and Norway. In the background, something else emerged simultaneously: an animal-sex-tourism industry, which has been blossoming in Denmark. Journalists like Margit Shabanzadeh, currently a reporter for TV2 News in Copenhagen, were on the cutting edge of exposing this burgeoning problem. She found a woman that trained dogs to have sex with other women, and says that despite claims the dog was healthy, it did not appear particularly happy upon her arrival. "The dog was injured and seemed to be limping, and to have an aversion to humans in general," Shabanzadeh said. Increased reporting of these incidents, which included barns being raided at night by animal rapists, sparked a public outcry. It drove the debate into the Danish political sphere, with activists demanding the government live up to the German standard and pressuring the former minister of agriculture to change the law. But he took no interest after a report by Peter Sandøe, the then chairman of Denmark's ethics advisory body, indicated that if no harm came to the animal, no crime had been committed. Sandøe, currently a professor of bioethics at the University of Copenhagen, conducted a study wherein he concluded that some animals could actually enjoy sex with humans.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

An excellent example of how complete secularism and liberalism will inevitably result in societal degradation. Bestiality is wrong, not because it constitutes animal cruelty (because sometimes it doesn't), but simply because it breaks the boundaries of nature. Humans are designed to have sexual relationships with humans, men with women, and women with men. Denmark needs to catch up! Criminalization may very well NOT be the answer because the costs can be extreme and not really worth the effort. However, zoophilia should be treated as a psychiatric disorder with medicine, psychotherapy, and behavioural interventions. More research is needed to address deviant sexual orientations.

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Society's mismanagement of the mentally ill is a disgrace

Society's mismanagement of the mentally ill is a disgrace | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

We are civilized people in the United States. We don’t set up leper colonies or concentration camps or psychiatric snake pits to banish people with severe mental illness. Instead we send them to jail or prison — almost 400,000 of them, more than 10 times the number receiving care in hospitals. And we also blithely ignore the fact that additional hundreds of thousands live homeless on the streets or in squalid housing and have little or no access to treatment. The severely mentally ill are rarely sent to jail for real crimes; they are usually locked up for doing annoying things that disturb the peace of the neighborhood. These offenses against public decorum could have been avoided had they received adequate treatment and decent housing. Most European countries regard such services as a basic societal responsibility and provide them efficiently and humanely. Our fairly recent reliance on prisons and homelessness as solutions to mental illness was the common fashion 200 years ago but now seems anachronistic and indecent in a society that has the tools and can afford to do much better.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"The National Institute of Mental Health has become so fixated on the brains and genes of people with severe mental illness that it has lost all interest in the desperate ways they have to lead their day-to-day lives. Its huge research budget now focuses almost exclusively on reductionistic biological research, the kind that so far has never improved the life of a single patient. I am all for supporting remarkable advances in neuroscience and genetics, but experience over the past 40 years teaches us how difficult it is to translate exciting basic science findings into effective clinical treatment. Meaningful progress based on neuroscience research will gradually occur, but it will be frustratingly slow and, at best, very partial. We mustn’t continue to neglect the crying needs of our current patients for the promise of future breakthroughs, especially since these breakthroughs will likely take decades, if they will occur at all."

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Alienated alienists: a new hope? : The Lancet Psychiatry

Alienated alienists: a new hope? : The Lancet Psychiatry | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it
Psychiatrists were once known as alienists because they cared for individuals who were thought of as alienated from both society and themselves.In the past 150 years or so, the terms psychiatry and psychiatrists have become more prominent and are used almost exclusively. Despite origins in the mainstream of medicine and the medical training of its practitioners, psychiatry is often not seen as a medical specialty or as scientific. Other medical professionals might see psychiatry as touchy feely and lacking intellectual rigour, resulting in poor recruitment and retention. Furthermore, psychiatric practitioners often experience internalised stigma, leading to a negative cycle of entrapment, depressive schema,and further self-stigma—a pattern hardly likely to inspire students and junior doctors to enter the specialty...

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"

The profession must look at its ability to integrate physical and mental health services and social and psychiatric services. In the clinical context, primary and secondary care must be more closely aligned than they have been so far. Understanding the value of biopsychosocial models of cause and management are crucial to give the profession a more robust outlook. Urgent debate and discussion and possible resolution must take place to compare roles of generalism versus specialism so that appropriate services are delivered that are physically and emotionally accessible to patients."

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Being Suicidal: What It Feels Like to Want to Kill Yourself

Being Suicidal: What It Feels Like to Want to Kill Yourself | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

In considering people’s motivations for killing themselves, it is essential to recognize that most suicides are driven by a flash flood of strong emotions, not rational, philosophical thoughts in which the pros and cons are evaluated critically. And, as I mentioned in last week’s column on the evolutionary biology of suicide, from a psychological science perspective, I don’t think any scholar ever captured the suicidal mind better than Florida State University psychologist Roy Baumeister in his 1990 Psychological Review article , “Suicide as Escape from the Self.” To reiterate, I see Baumeister’s cognitive rubric as the engine of emotions driving deCatanzaro’s biologically adaptive suicidal decision-making. There are certainly more recent theoretical models of suicide than Baumeister’s, but none in my opinion are an improvement. The author gives us a uniquely detailed glimpse into the intolerable and relentlessly egocentric tunnel vision that is experienced by a genuinely suicidal person. So let’s take a journey inside the suicidal mind, at least as it’s seen by Roy Baumeister. You might even come to discover that you’ve actually stepped foot in this dark psychological space before, perhaps without knowing it at the time.


Via Sandeep Gautam
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Suicidal ideation and actually completing a suicide are complex psychological and behavioral phenomena. “Concluding simply that depression causes suicide and leaving it at that may be inadequate for several reasons. It is abundantly clear that most depressed people do not attempt suicide and that not all suicide attempters are clinically depressed.” Read this EXCELLENT article about the intense feelings and perceptions that commonly lead to suicide.

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, August 13, 8:16 AM

"Suicide rates are lowest on Fridays and highest on Mondays; they also drop just before the major holidays and then spike sharply immediately after the holidays. Baumeister interprets these patterns as consistent with the idea that people’s high expectations for holidays and weekends materialize, after the fact, as bitter disappointments. "

I could have thought of a simpler explanation- the drudgery of returning to (an unacceptable ) daily grind:-)

Also, some of the steps towards suicidal ideation/ execution could have been labeled more simply like sudden losses in life(falling short of standards) , perceived loneliness (self-awareness) , guilt and shame ( negative affect), acute existential boredom forcing one to focus on concrete aspects ( cognitive deconstruction) and prior exposure/ habituation to pain ( dis-inhibition) ....look out for these in you and your loved ones and seek help!!

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Copenhagen’s New Bike Skyway Makes Commuting Look Fun

Copenhagen’s New Bike Skyway Makes Commuting Look Fun | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

This road is the latest addition to one of the most bicycle-friendly city infrastructures in the world. In Copenhagen, more than 50 percent of residents ride their bicycles to work. Portland, Oregon, with the most bicycle commuters in the United States, clocks in at 6.1 percent. Credit those numbers to a culture that encourages cycling, but also to an infrastructure that does the same, with traffic lights timed for bicycle speeds, cobblestone paths with smoothed shoulders, and parking systems that position unoccupied cars as a buffer between cycle lanes and moving traffic. So many people cycle that it’s become a quaint issue to find parking for the two-wheelers. Cykelslangen adds just 721 feet of length to the city’s 220 miles of bicycle paths, but it relieves congestion by taking riders over instead of through a waterfront shopping area.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Here's an excellent example of a worthwhile investment that encourages health and exercise. The money spent on building it could easily be earned from savings on otherwise common adverse health outcomes relating to lack of exercise and traffic accidents between cars and bicycles. Every big city should encourage people to utilize bicycles as their primary tool for transportation. Creating separate and attractive bicycle lanes is a brilliant way to encourage people to bike more and leave the car in the driveway. This is Danish dynamite in action!

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The voices heard by people with schizophrenia are friendlier in India and Africa, than in the US

The voices heard by people with schizophrenia are friendlier in India and Africa, than in the US | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

How we hear hallucinatory “voices,” either as the result of schizophrenia or some other undiagnosed condition, may depend largely on the culture in which we live, a new Stanford University study finds. The new findings could lead to profound clinical changes in how people receive treatment for mental health disorders that trouble them — indeed, to deplete the disorders of their stigma and to reframe them as an ordinary part of life. In the U.S., in particular, where mental health services continue to lag behind the management of one’s physical health, offering a non-pharmaceutical outlet for schizophrenia could hold enormous potential. “Our work found that people with serious psychotic disorder in different cultures have different voice-hearing experiences,” said lead author and Stanford anthropologist, Tanya Luhrmann, in a press release. “That suggests that the way people pay attention to their voices alters what they hear their voices say.”

 

See also: http://bps-research-digest.blogspot.com.es/2014/07/the-voices-heard-by-people-with.html

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"Offering a non-pharmaceutical outlet for schizophrenia could hold enormous potential."

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Dealing With Opioid Abuse Would Pay for Itself

Dealing With Opioid Abuse Would Pay for Itself | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Once championed as the answer to chronic pain, opioid medications and painkillers have become a large and costly problem in the United States. Fatal overdoses have quadrupled in the last 15 years, and opioids now cause more deaths than any other drug, over 16,000 in 2010. Prescription opioid abuse is also costly, sapping productivity and increasing health care and criminal justice costs to the tune of $55.7 billion in 2007, for example. Addressing this problem would cost money, too, but evidence suggests it would pay for itself.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Prescription drug abuse and dependence is one of the most serious threats to population mental health and general health of our time. Much more attention most be paid to this issue. Great economic savings can be made with the right strategies!

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The growing disconnect between GDP and wellbeing

The growing disconnect between GDP and wellbeing | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it
The link between economic growth and human well-being seems obvious. Indeed, as measured by gross domestic product, economic growth is widely viewed as the ultimate development objective. But it is time to rethink this approach. In fact, there is a rising disconnect between countries’ per capita GDP and their citizens’ well-being, as rapid output growth exacerbates health challenges… 
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"Persuading policy-makers and politicians of GDP’s limitations is no easy feat. After all, it is far simpler to defend a well-understood, long-accepted framework than it is to champion a new world view...

Transforming the world’s understanding of economic development requires a dynamic approach. Experts in various fields – including economics, sociology, psychology and the natural sciences – must work together to develop an integrated suite of indicators that provides a comprehensive picture of humanity’s productive base, on which people’s ability to pursue their interpretation of success depends. While final decisions should rest with policy-makers and citizens, the process must be guided by the best available science, uncompromised by political demands or vested interests... The world must align its value systems with this reality. We must learn to do more with less, decouple economic growth from resource consumption and nurture the social and spiritual aspects of our existence."

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Failed fertility in women who want children linked to worse mental health

Failed fertility in women who want children linked to worse mental health | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Around one-third of couples who embark upon fertility treatment are not successful in their endeavor, leaving them to adjust to an unfulfilled child-wish. Now, a new study published in the journal Human Reproduction suggests women who have difficulty accepting that they will not conceive a child after fertility treatment have worse long-term mental health than those who are able to let go of their desire to reproduce.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Lack of acceptance is generally not beneficial for mental health

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Sibling bullying increases depression risk

Sibling bullying increases depression risk | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Around 7,000 children aged 12 were asked if they had experienced a sibling saying hurtful things, hitting, ignoring or lying about them. The children were followed up at 18 and asked about their mental health. A charity said parents should deal with sibling rivalry before it escalates. Previous research has suggested that victims of peer bullying can be more susceptible to depression, anxiety and self-harm. This study claims to be the first to examine bullying by brothers or sisters during childhood for the same psychiatric problems in early adulthood.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"Being bullied regularly by a sibling could put children at risk of depression when they are older, a study led by the University of Oxford suggests."

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24-hour ‘Tweetathon’ to raise awareness of suicide prevention

24-hour ‘Tweetathon’ to raise awareness of suicide prevention | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

A 24-hour ‘Tweetathon’ will take place today, September 10 – World Suicide Prevention Day – to raise awareness of suicide prevention. Dr Alys Cole-King, a liaison psychiatrist and specialist in suicide prevention, has pledged to tweet around the clock to raise awareness about suicide prevention, starting 8am on September 10 and finishing 24 hours later. Dr Cole-King is co-founder of Connecting With People, a not-for-profit organisation that provides suicide awareness and prevention training to professionals across a range of healthcare specialities, and a spokesperson on suicide and self-harm for the Royal College of Psychiatrists. During the Tweetathon, Dr Cole-King will also launch the #connectingwith campaign to highlight how strong relationships, being connected with people and communities, and a sense of belonging are powerful protective factors against suicide....

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Today is World Suicide Prevention Day! Tweet and post today about preventing suicides worldwide!

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Previous depression can lead to brain networks becoming 'hyper-connected' in young adults

Previous depression can lead to brain networks becoming 'hyper-connected' in young adults | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Depression may be better predicted and understood now that University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have discovered that young adults who previously experienced the mental illness have hyper-connected emotional and cognitive networks in the brain. UIC researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the brain connectivity of young adults ages 18 to 23 while they were in a resting state. Thirty unmedicated young adults who had previously experienced depression and 23 healthy controls were used in the study, which has been published online in the journal PLOS ONE. "We wanted to see if the individuals who have had depression during their adolescence were different from their healthy peers," said Rachel Jacobs, research assistant professor in psychiatry at UIC's Institute for Juvenile Research, the lead author of the study. The researchers found many regions that are "hyper-connected - or talking to each other a little too much - among those who have a history of depression."

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"The transition to adulthood, a time when brain networks are nearly mature, may be a critical window for interventions. If we can help youth learn how to shift out of maladaptive strategies such as rumination, this may protect them from developing chronic depression and help them stay well as adults."

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Mentally ill more likely to be victims of homicide

Mentally ill more likely to be victims of homicide | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

According to Time to Change, over a third of the public think people with a mental health problem are likely to be violent. Homicide by people who are also patients with mental illness is perceived as contributing to negative public attitudes towards people with mental illness. Tragic and high profile killings by people with mental illness are often used to suggest that somehow so called “normal” people do not commit violent crime and if you do so, you must have a mental illness of some kind. It is a rare for a news story covering a homicide not to at least mention the mental health of the accused perpetrator. However, people with a severe mental illness are actually more likely to be victims of violence and crime than people in the general population. Where previous studies have investigated victims of homicide, people with a diagnosed mental illness were shown to have a 3-6 times higher risk, with higher risk still for people with diagnoses of alcohol and drug misuse.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"People with mental illness are often more likely to be victims of violence than perpetrators of violence. The increased risk of people who have a mental illness and are patients of mental health services for being a victim of homicide should underline the need for services to protect such vulnerable adults."

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We’re Talking About Depression All Wrong

We’re Talking About Depression All Wrong | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

As a psychiatrist who has grappled with it both professionally and personally, depression can be a multilayered beast, interlaced with one’s personality, vulnerabilities, and upbringing, all intermingling with the dark shades of misfiring brain chemistry. This complexity leads to ongoing confusion and debate over how much mental illness relies on personal resolve versus personal biology...

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"Mental illness is physical and medical, but it is also even more intricate than that; mental illness ties into our very existence, our interaction with everyone and everything. The prognosis of each person runs on a spectrum relative to their genetic loading and their environment. At least on a limited but important part of that spectrum, we as mental health professionals can intervene and help some people hang on, improve, come back against biology, and soothe against environment. For those that we can save, the rest of us must stand watch and bring them to light instead of losing them to falsehoods and misplaced moral codes about independence."

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5 Science-Backed Health Benefits Of Hypnosis

5 Science-Backed Health Benefits Of Hypnosis | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

It sounds like the work of sorcerers and scam artists, but hypnosis can play a very real role in protecting and promoting health. Once disregarded as a parlor trick, hypnosis is increasingly believed to improve many health outcomes. The American Medical Association approved hypnosis as a therapy in 1958 (although it later rescinded its position, according to the ASCH), and the APA followed suit three years later, according to Harvard Medical School. That's not to say it's a panacea: In fact, more research is needed to prove lasting benefits of hypnosis for certain facets of health, such as weight loss or smoking cessation. But more promising results exist in other areas of study. Here are a few of the science-backed benefits of hypnosis to consider...

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

When effective, hypnosis offers a solution superior to pharmacotherapy by being free from side-effects.

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6 Ways Health Care Data Can Reduce the Cost of Care

6 Ways Health Care Data Can Reduce the Cost of Care | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Hospitals executives expect cost accounting data to inform financial decision-making, but that data can do more than help identify ways to reduce expenditures. In 2012, David Nash, dean of the Thomas Jefferson University School of Population Health told Modern Healthcare that health care big data consists of more than understanding a patient’s disease. It also offers visibility into demographics, utilization trends, hospitalization risks and more. And, as Nash notes, “the more you understand, the more efficiently you can deploy resources.”

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

"Uniting financial data with patient analytics enables hospitals to pinpoint these trends and patterns that can simultaneously help control health care costs and improve patient outcomes."

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Boy has ears created from ribs

Boy has ears created from ribs | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Nine-year-old Kieran Sorkin had the surgery at London's Great Ormond Street Hospital. About 100 children a year in the UK are born without one or both ears, a condition known as microtia. Kieran was born deaf with small lobes where his ears should be. He can already hear, thanks to previous surgery to implant a hearing aid. "I want people to stop asking me questions", said Kieran from Hertfordshire. "I'd like just to look like my friends. "I'd also like to be able to wear sunglasses and earphones..."

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Amazing!

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Minister afsætter 60 millioner til psykiatrisk forskning

Minister afsætter 60 millioner til psykiatrisk forskning | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Uddannelses- og forskningsminister Sofie Carsten Nielsen (R) vil afsætte yderligere 60 millioner kroner til psykiatrisk forskning oven i de 2,2 milliarder kroner, som regeringen i maj afsatte i en psykiatriplan, skriver Politiken. »Psykiske lidelser tegner sig for en rigtig stor andel af det totale sygdomsbillede, og vi har som mål at ligestille psykiatrien og somatikken. Det har vi taget et stort skridt mod med psykiatriplanen, men vi er nødt til at vide mere,« siger Sofie Carsten Nielsen.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Sådan!

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Why Exercise and Relaxation Techniques Benefit The Socially Anxious

Why Exercise and Relaxation Techniques Benefit The Socially Anxious | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

In treating social anxiety — discomfort or fear in social situations, often of being judged — both relaxation techniques and exercise have been found beneficial (see: how to deal with anxiety). New research from Queen’s University suggests this is because it changes the way people perceive the world.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Exercise and relaxation techniques beneficial for the socially anxious.... and for everyone else!

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Er offentlige ansatte dovne og pjækkesyge?

Er offentlige ansatte dovne og pjækkesyge? | Psychiatry, Health Systems and Healthcare Management | Scoop.it

Kommunalt ansatte har i gennemsnit 12,5 sygedage om året, hvorimod privat ansatte nøjes med 6,1 sygedag om året. Er offentlige ansatte dovne og pjækkesyge? Eller har de simpelthen dårligere helbred? Måske dækker tallene over noget andet.

 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Det er ekstremt vigtigt for samfundets vækst af den offentlige sektor præges af en kultur som promoverer loyalitet, indsats, og servicemindedness. En nation uden en effektiv offentligt sektor kan ikke opnå sandt fremskridt.

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