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Pubic hair grooming 'STI risk linked to skin tears'

Pubic hair grooming 'STI risk linked to skin tears' | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Doctors say small tears in the skin from shaving or trimming could make it easier for infections to take hold. But they also say groomers - particularly extreme ones - tend to be more sexually active too. STIs are passed on through unprotected sex or genital contact.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Women and men who regularly trim or remove all their pubic hair run a greater risk of sexually transmitted infections than those who do not..

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A crisis of depression, suicide sweeps the medical community

A crisis of depression, suicide sweeps the medical community | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Suicide among medical students and doctors has been a largely unacknowledged phenomenon for decades, obscured by secrecy and shame. Now, it’s beginning to emerge from the shadows.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

The starkest sign of the crisis gripping medicine is the number of US physicians who commit suicide every year — 300 to 400, about the size of three average medical school classes. Male doctors are 1.4 times more likely to kill themselves than men in the general population; female physicians, 2.3 times more likely.

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How might MDMA be used to treat PTSD?

How might MDMA be used to treat PTSD? | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

MDMA is one step closer to becoming a legal form of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the United States.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

The symptoms of PTSD often block patients from advancing in therapy because of the severity of their experienced trauma. MDMA — more commonly known as ecstasy — has shown promising results in the treatment of PTSD because it promotes a closeness between people, makes people feel a lot more open to others, enables them to communicate more effectively and more directly while also reducing fear and anxiety.

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Now your smartphone can even analyze sperm

Now your smartphone can even analyze sperm | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

If a couple is having difficulty conceiving a child, it's important that the man get a motility test done – it shows how active his sperm are. The problem is, a lot of guys feel awkward about going to a clinic and "providing a sample" on-site. That's where Medical Electronic Systems' YO system comes in. It lets users check their motility at home (or wherever else they feel inclined to do so) using their iPhone or Galaxy smartphone.


Via Wildcat2030
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Smartphones can do anything these days.

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Man 'cured' of prostate cancer after doctors shock tumour to death with testosterone 

Man 'cured' of prostate cancer after doctors shock tumour to death with testosterone  | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Professor Sam Denmeade, from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, US, who led the study, said: ""Our goal is to shock the cancer cells by exposing them rapidly to very high followed by very low levels of testosterone in the blood. The results are unexpected and exciting. 
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A man with advanced prostate cancer is believed to be cured after doctors 'shocked' his tumour to death with huge amounts of testosterone. The result has been described as 'unexpected' and 'exciting' because most prostate cancer therapies work by depriving tumours of testosterone, as cancer uses it as a fuel. Other seriously ill men taking part in the same trial showed responses that astounded scientists, with tumours shrinking and the progress of their disease halted.

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Breaking good: Australian schoolboys reproduce Martin Shkreli-hiked drug for £1 a pill

Breaking good: Australian schoolboys reproduce Martin Shkreli-hiked drug for £1 a pill | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

The year 11 students from Sydney Grammar managed to reproduce the drug Daraprim, commonly used to treat conditions related to Aids and cancer, for only about AUD$2 (£1) a dose. The pills were being sold for $13.50 (£8.75) each, but Mr Shkreli's company, Turing Pharmaceuticals, increased the price immediately after buying the drug's rights in September 2015 to $750, earning the former hedge fund manager the title of "America's most hated man". Treatment requires a course of 100 pills.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A group of Australian schoolboys has succeeded in recreating a life-saving drug which infamously saw its price increase by 5,000 per cent overnight when pharmaceuticals tycoon Martin Shkreli bought its rights.

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Young cancer survivors have twice the risk of suicide

Young cancer survivors have twice the risk of suicide | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

This is the result of a national cohort study by researcher and medical doctor Maria Winther Gunnes at the Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care at the University of Bergen (UiB). "From our study, it is not possible to say whether there is a connection between the cancer diagnosis and suicide on an individual level, but what we see is an association at population level," says Winther Gunnes.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 25 have a more than two-fold increased risk of suicide compared to their non-cancer peers.

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Ambulances 'not getting to life-or-death calls in time'

Ambulances 'not getting to life-or-death calls in time' | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Ambulance services are struggling to reach seriously ill and injured patients quickly enough after rising demand has left the system at breaking point, a BBC investigation has found.

 

See also:

Ambulance pressure: Five ways services are innovating

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-38077408

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Your train can be late. Your flight can be late. Your favorite TV-show can be late. Your period can be late. Your waiter can bring your toasted sandwich too late. Inconvenient or unsettling as these may be, they are still acceptable. But your ambulance should never never ever be too late!

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Här är roboten som kan ta över läkares jobb

Här är roboten som kan ta över läkares jobb | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Smart, outtröttlig, har oändligt med tid... Hör läkaren och hjärnforskaren Mouna Esmaeilzadeh om fördelar och nackdela med artificiell intelligens i vården.

 

See also:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/doctor-robot-me-who-would-you-choose-mouna-esmaeilzadeh?trk=hp-feed-article-title-share

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Kunstig intelligens indtager snarligt lægevidenskaben. 

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Scientists Can Now Deliver Medicine by Controlling Bacteria

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Now we can talk to cells via walkie-talkie... sort of.

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We Finally Know How the 'Mind-Altering' Cat Parasite Controls Our Immune Response

We Finally Know How the 'Mind-Altering' Cat Parasite Controls Our Immune Response | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

For the uninitiated, Toxoplasma is a cat-borne parasite that causes Toxoplasmosis - a disease that is considered 'asymptomatic' in most healthy people, but can lead to a range of other disorders in those with compromised immune systems, such as pregnant women and the elderly. While most doctors wouldn’t recommend you bother testing for Toxoplasma unless you’re at risk of getting sick from it, studies have turned up curious links between it and certain host behaviours.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Up to 50 percent of global population is infected by the 'cat parasite' Toxoplasma gondii, and in some areas, the infection rate is as high as 95 percent. Unless you get tested, there’s no way of knowing that you’re infected, but it’s been associated with a number of mental disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Toxoplasma is everywhere, and while the jury is still out on how much it actually messes with our minds, scientists have finally figured out why it’s so good at dodging our body's immune response.

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Changes in the diet affect epigenetics via the microbiota

Changes in the diet affect epigenetics via the microbiota | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
You are what you eat, the old saying goes, but why is that so? Researchers have known for some time that diet affects the balance of microbes in our bodies, but how that translates into an effect on the host has not been understood. Now, research in mice is showing that microbes communicate with their hosts by sending out metabolites that act on histones—thus influencing gene transcription not only in the colon but also in tissues in other parts of the body. The findings publish November 23 in Molecular Cell.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Gut microbiota affect epigenetic programming in a variety of different tissues.

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Researchers Develop Low-Cost, Wearable ‘Lab On The Skin’ To Analyze Sweat For Health Monitoring

In a study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, John Rogers and colleagues were able to show how a device no bigger than a quarter can analyze sweat to assess key biomarkers and help people decide if they need to make any adjustments while engaged in physical activity, like drinking more water, or tell if something is medically wrong. "The intimate skin interface created by this wearable, skin-like microfluidic system enables new measurement capabilities not possible with the kinds of absorbent pads and sponges currently used in sweat collection," said Rogers, who led the research team.

 

- See more at: http://www.techtimes.com/articles/186913/20161125/researchers-develop-low-cost-wearable-lab-on-the-skin-to-analyze-sweat-for-health-monitoring.htm#sthash.WXqQYEKD.dpuf

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Researchers have come up with a first-of-its-kind "lab on the skin," a low-cost, soft wearable device that adheres to the skin easily and measures sweat to determine how an individual is responding to physical activity.

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Smart Toilets: Doctors in Your Bathroom

Smart Toilets: Doctors in Your Bathroom | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Toto's newest smart john, the Intelligence Toilet II, is proving that it is more than an ordinary porcelain throne by recording and analyzing important data like weight, BMI, blood pressure, and blood sugar levels.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Could "smart toilets" aid medicine by monitoring health and providing early detection for medical conditions?

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Wireless Brain Implant Allows "Locked-In" Woman to Communicate

Wireless Brain Implant Allows "Locked-In" Woman to Communicate | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Experts call the technology a “significant achievement,” but critics say the risks may not be justified.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A wireless device that decodes brain waves has enabled a woman paralyzed by locked-in syndrome to communicate from the comfort of her home.

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Understanding of Parkinson's 'transformed'

Understanding of Parkinson's 'transformed' | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Scientists in California say they have transformed understanding of Parkinson's disease. Their animal experiments, published in the journal Cell, suggest the brain disorder may be caused by bacteria living in the gut.
The findings could eventually lead to new ways of treating the disease, such as drugs to kill gut bugs or probiotics.
Experts said the results opened an "exciting new avenue of study".

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Gut bacteria regulate, and appear to even be required for, the symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

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Virtual Reality Approaches ‘Game Changer’ Status in Surgery

Virtual Reality Approaches ‘Game Changer’ Status in Surgery | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

On April 12 of this year, Paul Szotek, MD, FACS, director of the Indiana Hernia Center and clinical assistant professor of surgery at Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Indianapolis, virtually transported his colleague Hugh McGregor, PhD, FRACS, almost 9,000 miles from North Brisbane, Australia, to Greencastle, Ind., during the first live virtual reality transcontinental hernia surgery. For this case, Dr. Szotek performed a routine umbilical hernia repair. The idea was to test the feasibility of the surgeon point-of-view 360-degree immersive virtual reality technology compared with a conventional two-dimensional live streaming technology over the long distance, knowing that Dr. Szotek could easily and safely complete the case on his own if the technology failed.

 

Read more:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/silicorn-valley-indiana-surgical-team-welcomes-virtual-paul-szotek?trk=prof-post

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Virtual reality and live streaming will likely be the next step in surgical education, training and coaching, allowing surgeons to immerse themselves from afar.

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Surprising monkey study could lead to 'functional' HIV cure

Surprising monkey study could lead to 'functional' HIV cure | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Dr. Anthony Fauci doesn't get too excited about the results of animal studies, and he doesn't make house calls. But when a drug already taken by thousands of people for intestinal conditions appeared to control the monkey version of HIV, it got the attention of the director of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Fauci hopped on a plane to Cambridge, Mass., to personally tell Japan's Takeda Pharmaceutical Co's U.S. representatives that their drug may offer a dramatic advance in the fight against AIDS. Takeda’s drug suppressed the virus to undetectable levels in eight monkeys, some for two years. The findings raise hopes for a so-called "functional cure" – a treatment that puts the disease in sustained remission. "The data was so dramatic," said Fauci, who has made AIDS research his life’s work. The drug is one of several promising ideas heading into early-stage human trials, all seeking to help patients control the virus that causes AIDS for extended periods without daily antiretroviral therapy (ART).

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A drug already taken by thousands of people for intestinal conditions appears to control the monkey version of HIV.

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Researchers' sexism fears are putting women's health at risk, scientist claims 

Researchers' sexism fears are putting women's health at risk, scientist claims  | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Male and female brains react differently to drugs when it comes to some conditions, such as strokes, but research predominantly concentrates on men, the guest editor of this month’s Journal of Neuroscience Research said. The research is then generalised and widened out for women, despite there being evidence gender “matters fundamentally, powerfully and pervasively”.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Scientists’ fear of being labelled sexist is putting women’s health at risk because researchers have ignored crucial gender differences in the brain. The heart of the resistance is the view that if neuroscience shows males and females are not the same in brain function, we are showing they are not equal. Different ≠ unequal

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Hallucinogenic drug psilocybin eases existential anxiety in people with life-threatening cancer

Hallucinogenic drug psilocybin eases existential anxiety in people with life-threatening cancer | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

The Johns Hopkins team released its study results, involving 51 adult patients, concurrently with researchers from New York University Langone Medical Center, who conducted a similarly designed study on 29 participants. Both studies are published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology on Dec. 1.

 

See also:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2016/12/01/a-psychedelic-drug-helped-ease-cancer-patients-fear-of-death/

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Researchers report that a substantial majority of people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression experiences considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of psilocybin—the active compound in hallucinogenic "magic mushrooms."

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Soon Your Doctor Might Prescribe Virtual Reality Instead Of Painkillers

Soon Your Doctor Might Prescribe Virtual Reality Instead Of Painkillers | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

The next time you have a headache, a Swedish pharmacy wants you to strap on a virtual reality headset and pretend you're sitting next to a campfire by a lake in Sweden, watching the Northern Lights as night falls. The pharmacy, Apotek Hjärtat, designed a free VR app for pain relief called Happy Place.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

VR app uses nature settings to distract patients from their pain—and there's lots of evidence that this strategy works.

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Why 'fitness is something we should be measuring' at the doctor's office

Why 'fitness is something we should be measuring' at the doctor's office | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Add cardiorespiratory fitness as a vital sign, report from American Heart Association urges
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

A growing body of medical research shows that cardiorespiratory fitness is a potentially stronger predictor of death than more established risk factors such as smoking, high cholesterol and hypertension. The American Heart Association now urges that doctors should assess and estimate the cardiorespiratory fitness of adults during routine visits just as they measure blood pressure. 

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Artificial Spinal Cord Wirelessly Restores Walking in Paralyzed Monkeys

Artificial Spinal Cord Wirelessly Restores Walking in Paralyzed Monkeys | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
Until a few years ago, reversing paralysis was the stuff of movie miracles.
Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

By implanting a wireless neural prosthetic into the spinal cord of paralyzed monkeys, a research team achieved the seemingly impossible: the monkeys regained use of a paralyzed lower limb a mere six days after their initial injury without requiring any training.

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‘Cybersecurity has become a full-time job’ in healthcare

‘Cybersecurity has become a full-time job’ in healthcare | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it
If 2015 was supposed to be the “year of the hack” in healthcare, cybercriminals really were just getting started. This year, we have seen the rise of ransomware targeting healthcare organizations, plus continued phishing attacks and even some good, old-fashioned laptop theft.

 

See also:

The Internet of Things Is Growing Faster Than the Ability to Defend It https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/iot-growing-faster-than-the-ability-to-defend-it/?wt.mc=SA_Twitter-Share 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

It’s been another rotten year for healthcare cybersecurity. Organizations, including providers, payers and even some vendors are scrambling to keep up as the nature of security threats evolves.

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Predatory bacteria can wipe out superbugs, says study

Predatory bacteria can wipe out superbugs, says study | Medicine and Psychiatry | Scoop.it

Experiments showed a dose of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus acted like a "living antibiotic" to help clear an otherwise lethal infection. The animal studies, published in Current Biology, suggested there would be no side effects. Experts said the approach was unusual, but should not be overlooked. Fear of an antibiotic apocalypse, caused by growing levels of bacteria resisting the drugs, has led to scientists trying other approaches. Bdellovibrio is a fast-swimming bacterium that works its way inside other bacteria where it devours its hosts' insides and swells in size.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's insight:

Predatory bacteria - that eat others of their kind - could be a new weapon in the fight against superbugs.

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