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Low Impact House by Schlyter / Gezelius Arkitektkontor

Low Impact House by Schlyter / Gezelius Arkitektkontor | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

This design responds to the waste of space in today´s interiors and exteriors, the lack of respect for the natural landscape, the global use of non-renewable materials, and how all of this in various ways is linked to our digital tools.

The house is built by a local contractor and a local carpentry shop has milled all the building parts. Every part of the building was designed specifically for this project to awoid waste material, using different kinds of wood from sustainably forested woodland...


Via Lauren Moss
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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:39 AM

A little jewel, crafted with care in every detail. It really melts into the lanscape in a non intruding manner.

victor vasquez's curator insight, January 10, 2014 2:35 AM

building things from renewable materials, in my opinion is a great idea. Not only will buildings and houses be constructed, but less wood will be needed to be cut down and i think that would not just help the planet and all of us on it.

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Multi Use Infrastructure at Its Most Innovative

Multi Use Infrastructure at Its Most Innovative | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

New York City is certainly willing to pay top dollar for excellent design with a new $3 billion water treatment plant taking shape in Van Cortlandt park in the Bronx. The Croton water treatment by Grimshaw Architects and Ken Smith Landscape Architects includes some $250 million in new buildings, plazas, wetlands and meadows, and a public golf driving range, which, amazingly, sits right on top of the plant.

In a session at the 2012 ASLA Annual Meeting in Phoenix, Ken Smith, ASLA, Ken Smith Landscape Architects; David Burke, Grimshaw Architects; and Charles McKinney, Affiliate ASLA, City of New York, Department of Parks and Recreation, explained how the project is the result of NYC’s design, stormwater management, and parks policies. And while these numerous policies and design requirements were sometimes in conflict, said Smith, the design eventually succeeded because it cleverly integrated security and stormwater management features with public amenities...


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Empire State Building goes green in more ways than one

Empire State Building goes green in more ways than one | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
The Empire State Building is going green in more ways than one.


The Empire State Building was never intended to be low-impact. It was built as a symbol of the power of New York--and today, it's a surprising case study in the power of efficiency. A series of cost-effective, energy-efficient retrofits have dramatically reduced energy waste in the Empire State Building, saving $2.4 million in operating costs in the first year alone. In the next few years, when the project is complete, the building is expected to reduce its energy use by nearly 40 percent--and save about $4.4 million each year...


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Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from green streets
Scoop.it!

Multi Use Infrastructure at Its Most Innovative

Multi Use Infrastructure at Its Most Innovative | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

New York City is certainly willing to pay top dollar for excellent design with a new $3 billion water treatment plant taking shape in Van Cortlandt park in the Bronx. The Croton water treatment by Grimshaw Architects and Ken Smith Landscape Architects includes some $250 million in new buildings, plazas, wetlands and meadows, and a public golf driving range, which, amazingly, sits right on top of the plant.

In a session at the 2012 ASLA Annual Meeting in Phoenix, Ken Smith, ASLA, Ken Smith Landscape Architects; David Burke, Grimshaw Architects; and Charles McKinney, Affiliate ASLA, City of New York, Department of Parks and Recreation, explained how the project is the result of NYC’s design, stormwater management, and parks policies. And while these numerous policies and design requirements were sometimes in conflict, said Smith, the design eventually succeeded because it cleverly integrated security and stormwater management features with public amenities...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.