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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


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I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
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A modern treehouse designed to dissolve into the landscape

A modern treehouse designed to dissolve into the landscape | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

This home, known as the "Tree house”, is perched on a steep forested hillside above the Great Ocean Road and Bass Strait in Victoria.

In designing the Tree house, architects Jackson Clements Burrows, drew on the modest local vernacular of 1950’s painted fibro shacks, by using cement sheets with expressed batten joints to dissolve the house into the surrounding landscape. The 2 tone green colour scheme used for the exterior helped to merge the building with the vegetation on the hillside on which it sits. The vertical timber battens on the building are a naturally stained timber, which will silver over time like the branches and trunks of trees in the bush surrounds.

The changing light and colours throughout the day further engage the home with its bushland context...


Via Lauren Moss
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H House: a modular + contemporary Interpretation of traditional architecture

H House: a modular + contemporary Interpretation of traditional architecture | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Not far from Budapest, on the fringes of a forest, there stands Tamás Dévényi’s shingle covered new house. The disarmingly simple building creates generous spatial relations on the 1,5 hectare land. The proximity of the bustling city life doesn’t mean that we can not relish the convenience of nature and the separation of a farmhouse. Borrowing its form and use of materials from the Central-European peasant architecture, the building’s modular structure follows contemporary design thinking.

“The requirements for a country house have changed a lot during the past hundred years, but using the old Hungarian peasant house’s archetype was a good starting point for the design in a situation where the strict local building regulations tie the architects’ freedom,” said writer Brigi Bugya.


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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
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House in Belas: function + beauty within its surrounding environment

House in Belas: function + beauty within its surrounding environment | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The House in Belas is a contemporary and inclusive project in tune with nature and reflective of local vernacular design.

The design intends to express a contemporary look onto the main aspects of traditional Portuguese architecture, with special attention to the balance and harmony between each building. The house consists of five different bodies, linked through passages.

Spaces between each body create a series of relationships, distances and views are generated, providing a rich and diverse atmosphere. The social areas are located in the core of it all, benefitting from the surrounding environment, and allowing a simple and functional distribution throughout the house.


Visit the link for a gallery of images of this beautiful and simple design...


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Two Sustainable Homes in Luque: In harmony with the environment...

Two Sustainable Homes in Luque: In harmony with the environment... | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

In this project, the realization of a living space that suits the topography, the vegetation, and the tropical climate required the knowledge gained from the study of vernacular architecture. The “Culata Jovai” or “House of Confronted Rooms” is a bioclimatic solution to incorporating traditional ways of living harmoniously with the environment in Paraguay. It constitutes a base typology for a reinterpretation of the vernacular, according to new functional programs, needs of symbolic representation and new technologies, framed in a sustainable project.

With the inclusion of green roof, the original space of vegetation displaced by the construction was recovered, also reducing the heat gain due to the thermal inertia of the underground spaces, therefore reducing greatly the conventional energy consumption of homes.


View more images of this unique sustainable home at the article link...


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