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Underground Culture: Designing A Museum for Los Angeles' Historic District

Underground Culture: Designing A Museum for Los Angeles' Historic District | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Downtown Los Angeles’s historic core is about to get its first major museum, if that’s what you want to call it. Local developer Tom Gilmore and architect Tom Wiscombe are teaming up on the complex project, which they are calling the Old Bank District Museum. It will be dedicated to contemporary Los Angeles art and located in the sub-basements, basements, ground floors, mezzanines, and roofs of three interconnected buildings along Main and Fourth streets.

“We’re going beyond the frontier of street level,” said Tom Wiscombe, principal at Tom Wiscombe Architecture and a professor at SCI-Arc. Gilmore, founder of Gilmore Associates, who has been a major player in the resurrection of the Bank District, calls the project “insanely organic.”


Via Lauren Moss
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D.LIM Architects Digs Subterranean Forum for CJ Nine Bridges in Korea

D.LIM Architects Digs Subterranean Forum for CJ Nine Bridges in Korea | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

South Korean studio D•LIM architects has completed a multipurpose facility for CJ, one of the countries largest companies. Located at the center’s golf club on jeju island, the subterranean project avoids disrupting views of the surrounding forest and natural landscape. More than half of the volume is dug beneath the ground level, with a large hole subtracted from the roof to filter light through to the spaces below. The circular void is in the shape of the CJ’s official logo, which represents notions of joy – the meeting rooms and workspaces are positioned around this core element to absorb natural daylight and uplifting energy from the sky above.


Via Lauren Moss
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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
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Partly Hidden Beach House with Unobstructed Sea Views in Norway

Partly Hidden Beach House with Unobstructed Sea Views in Norway | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Split House is a peculiar beach house partly hidden under ground. The house's two levels are made of natural materials. Each level enables lovely sea views.

The Oslo-based architectural studio JVA designed a beach house that folds into the landscape. Located near the sea, the residence is partly hidden under ground, allowing unobstructed sea views for the neighbours. Capturing the best panoramic views, the house offers a unique living experience.

The roof is covered with grass and can be also used as a terrace whilst large expanses of glass enable panoramic views to relax and inspire. The interior feels light and airy, opening up to the landscape, with transparency playing a key role in this project, providing an incredibly warm and bright environment.


Via Lauren Moss
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Betty Fitzgerald's curator insight, April 15, 2014 11:41 AM

I love the uncluttered approach to this beach house. And the sleek contemporary siding combined with the natural curving cobbled walk is perfect. Can I live here!?

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.