PROYECTO ESPACIOS
2.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from green streets
Scoop.it!

Pedestrian Bridge in Aranzadi Park / Peralta Ayesa Arquitectos + Opera ingeniería

Pedestrian Bridge in Aranzadi Park / Peralta Ayesa Arquitectos + Opera ingeniería | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

This project consists of, on the one hand, the construction of a pedestrian bridge to improve access between the park and the city and, on the other hand, the construction of some sheds, in the park’s fruit and vegetable garden area, to serve as storage spaces for the garden concessionaires.

The bridge forms a part of the geometric design of the pedestrian and bicycle paths and the water and river systems. At the same time, it creates an ideal spot for visitors and an observation point from the bridge to view the park from the city...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from green streets
Scoop.it!

Plaza Mayor by MTM Arquitectos: Context-Sensitive Design in Madrid

Plaza Mayor by MTM Arquitectos: Context-Sensitive Design in Madrid | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Madrid-based MTM arquitectos have strategically planned the design of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid’s campus in the capital and largest city of Spain.

The Spanish studio’s proposal is laid out according to the university’s original plan centred on common spaces so as to ensure, through an integrated and inclusive urban development strategy, accessible focal points which serve to align both Madrilenians and faculty students’ interests, increasing social interactions.

MTM arquitectos’ forward-thinking approach to urban design aims to provide the campus with a legible structure and a distinctive identity. Built form is therefore used as a substitute to hermetic and restrictive borders in order to define accesses, as well as to create the stage for a compelling and spontaneous urban life.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Bioclimatic House in the Canary Islands, Spain

Bioclimatic House in the Canary Islands, Spain | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

This bioclimatic house, by Estudio José Luis Rodríguez, is a self-sufficient structure integrated into the terrain of the Canary Islands, a landscape characterized by a continuous terracing of the extreme topography.


In response to this site, the design features a basalt stone wall that supports a light structure of plywood, galvanized steel walls and glass.

The building's orientation is determined by solar radiation; photovoltaic panels produce electricity, in order to achieve zero carbon emissions. The living area is connected to the outside with a space that is protected from sun and wind, while a wall located in the sleeping area to the north has a high thermal mass for passive temperature control.

The design also aims to reduce its ecological footprint on the use of materials and construction systems by using local materials (basalt wall insulation covered with volcanic lapilli, for example), environmentally certified materials and no harmful elements, such as VOC compounds in synthetic paints and varnishes.


View more images of this unique, contextural and contemporary green project at the link to ArchDaily's feature...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
FUCOL INGENIERIA's curator insight, April 12, 2015 10:23 AM

añada su visión ...

David Regalado's curator insight, July 3, 2015 7:47 AM

Que gran trabajo!!!! Esto es lo que queremos en las Islas Canarias;)

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Madrid-based architect Juan Herreros sees this no-frills holiday home in rural Spain as an animal occupying but not transforming the landscape.

Casa Garoza – a tiny, elegant shed in the scrubby Spanish countryside near Ávila – sits clearly within the latter camp: a modular anti-villa that is both austere and sophisticated. Derived from continuing research into modular buildings at Juan Herreros’ Madrid-based office, it was commissioned by a city-based designer-artist couple who wanted a no-frills weekend retreat. It’s a pre-fab, but in its modesty and scale, a far cry from the recent American trend for “designer” pre-fabs – reinvented double-wides for the Ikea generation.

Sitting on steel legs that are bolted to the rocks on site – without the need for any excavation – the house, Herreros says, is like an animal that occupies the landscape without transforming it. The ground continues uninterrupted beneath the building, suggesting it could be lifted up and leave no trace, and there is no landscaping apart from a simple, raised deck on one side. It comprises eight modules, which took four months to build in the factory (though Herreros estimates this could have been halved), and a day to install on site...

 

Read the complete story on this modular + innovative project at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from green streets
Scoop.it!

Plaza Mayor by MTM Arquitectos: Context-Sensitive Design in Madrid

Plaza Mayor by MTM Arquitectos: Context-Sensitive Design in Madrid | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Madrid-based MTM arquitectos have strategically planned the design of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid’s campus in the capital and largest city of Spain.

The Spanish studio’s proposal is laid out according to the university’s original plan centred on common spaces so as to ensure, through an integrated and inclusive urban development strategy, accessible focal points which serve to align both Madrilenians and faculty students’ interests, increasing social interactions.

MTM arquitectos’ forward-thinking approach to urban design aims to provide the campus with a legible structure and a distinctive identity. Built form is therefore used as a substitute to hermetic and restrictive borders in order to define accesses, as well as to create the stage for a compelling and spontaneous urban life.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Site, Context + Renewable Energy at ITER Building Technology Park by Estudio Lunar

Site, Context + Renewable Energy at ITER Building Technology Park by Estudio Lunar | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in Tenerife, one of the most populated islands in Spain, the second prize winning proposal for the ITER Building Technology Park settles in like a crater, relating to its volcanic surroundings.

Estudio Lunar‘s design consists of two elements, the first one contains the program which is situated in the terrain interacting with it; and the second element that is situated over the terrain and only touches it to create the main access in the north protecting the building from the prevalent winds coming from the north-east.


The roof of the building offers 2800 m2 for solar panels with the peak conditions. On the underground floors we have the most essential natural energetic systems: natural isolation, solar protection, cross ventilation, and thermic inertia. The underground levels take advantage of all the energy accumulated in the ground as a natural isolation, keeping a stable temperature during all the year without needing any additional energy contribution. The small courtyards system that organizes the program underground offers natural light and cross ventilation to renew the air inside...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Madrid-based architect Juan Herreros sees this no-frills holiday home in rural Spain as an animal occupying but not transforming the landscape.

Casa Garoza – a tiny, elegant shed in the scrubby Spanish countryside near Ávila – sits clearly within the latter camp: a modular anti-villa that is both austere and sophisticated. Derived from continuing research into modular buildings at Juan Herreros’ Madrid-based office, it was commissioned by a city-based designer-artist couple who wanted a no-frills weekend retreat. It’s a pre-fab, but in its modesty and scale, a far cry from the recent American trend for “designer” pre-fabs – reinvented double-wides for the Ikea generation.

Sitting on steel legs that are bolted to the rocks on site – without the need for any excavation – the house, Herreros says, is like an animal that occupies the landscape without transforming it. The ground continues uninterrupted beneath the building, suggesting it could be lifted up and leave no trace, and there is no landscaping apart from a simple, raised deck on one side. It comprises eight modules, which took four months to build in the factory (though Herreros estimates this could have been halved), and a day to install on site...

 

Read the complete story on this modular + innovative project at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.