PROYECTO ESPACIOS
Follow
Find tag "rural"
1.6K views | +1 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from green streets
Scoop.it!

Rural Urban Framework: Designing Projects that Help Communities Come Together

Rural Urban Framework: Designing Projects that Help Communities Come Together | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Often lost among the headlines about China's astonishing development has been a growing interest in the corresponding transformation of the Chinese countryside. At the forefront of architectural research and experimentation in this area is Rural Urban Framework (RUF), a studio headed by University of Hong Kong professors Joshua Bolchover and John Lin.


Since 2006, Bolchover and Lin, who originally hail from England and Taiwan, respectively, have been working with nonprofit organizations, private donors, and local governments on projects in villages throughout China. In Qinmo, in southern Guangdong province, they converted a disused school building into a community center, complete with a demonstration farm. In northern Shaanxi province, their Lingzidi bridge spans a small river to better connect local residents with agricultural fields, while accommodating washing, fishing, and small-truck access.

“Nowadays, 50 percent of the world lives in cities,” says Lin. “But we're interested in the other 50 percent—especially in China, one of the most intensively urban and intensively rural places in the world.”


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Rural Sustainability: Off the Grid Home in Ontario

Rural Sustainability: Off the Grid Home in Ontario | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
For this rural Ontario home, building sustainably was less about high-tech gizmos than learning to truly love the land.

The 925-sq-foot house blends into the landscape with a steel shed roof and siding; it looks like a high-design little brother to the barns on the surrounding farms, and its energy footprint is equally subtle: Designer Lisa Moffitt built it with an array of sustainable features that take the simple home off-grid...


Read about these features and learn more about this contemporary green project at dwell.com.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Madrid-based architect Juan Herreros sees this no-frills holiday home in rural Spain as an animal occupying but not transforming the landscape.

Casa Garoza – a tiny, elegant shed in the scrubby Spanish countryside near Ávila – sits clearly within the latter camp: a modular anti-villa that is both austere and sophisticated. Derived from continuing research into modular buildings at Juan Herreros’ Madrid-based office, it was commissioned by a city-based designer-artist couple who wanted a no-frills weekend retreat. It’s a pre-fab, but in its modesty and scale, a far cry from the recent American trend for “designer” pre-fabs – reinvented double-wides for the Ikea generation.

Sitting on steel legs that are bolted to the rocks on site – without the need for any excavation – the house, Herreros says, is like an animal that occupies the landscape without transforming it. The ground continues uninterrupted beneath the building, suggesting it could be lifted up and leave no trace, and there is no landscaping apart from a simple, raised deck on one side. It comprises eight modules, which took four months to build in the factory (though Herreros estimates this could have been halved), and a day to install on site...

 

Read the complete story on this modular + innovative project at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand

Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.


Architects Statement:

"Shoal Bay is a remote settlement on the rugged east coast of southern Hawkes Bay. The building is designed to be part of the rural setting, raised off the ground and sitting beside the original woolshed, which has served the bay since the early 1900's. The bach is rugged yet welcoming and offers unpretentious shelter, it is the type of place where you kick off your shoes and don't need to worry about walking sand through the house.
The bach is formed of two slightly off-set pavilions, one housing the bedrooms and the other the main living space. Decks are located at each end of the living pavilion allowing the sun to be followed throughout the day. Sliding screens at the north-west end provide adjustable shelter for the different wind conditions, offer privacy from neighbouring campers and act as walls for outside sleeping."


The sustainable, passive design features an interior spatial arrangement oriented for solar gain, shaded in the summer by the sliding shutters, which also provide shelter from the prevailing northwest winds. Also increasing the efficiency are high levels of insulation, along with solar panels that sit between the two pavilions...


Visit the link to view more images of this contemporary passive design that responds to its site and rural context...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.

Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain

Casa Garoza: a contemporary shed in rural Spain | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Madrid-based architect Juan Herreros sees this no-frills holiday home in rural Spain as an animal occupying but not transforming the landscape.

Casa Garoza – a tiny, elegant shed in the scrubby Spanish countryside near Ávila – sits clearly within the latter camp: a modular anti-villa that is both austere and sophisticated. Derived from continuing research into modular buildings at Juan Herreros’ Madrid-based office, it was commissioned by a city-based designer-artist couple who wanted a no-frills weekend retreat. It’s a pre-fab, but in its modesty and scale, a far cry from the recent American trend for “designer” pre-fabs – reinvented double-wides for the Ikea generation.

Sitting on steel legs that are bolted to the rocks on site – without the need for any excavation – the house, Herreros says, is like an animal that occupies the landscape without transforming it. The ground continues uninterrupted beneath the building, suggesting it could be lifted up and leave no trace, and there is no landscaping apart from a simple, raised deck on one side. It comprises eight modules, which took four months to build in the factory (though Herreros estimates this could have been halved), and a day to install on site...

 

Read the complete story on this modular + innovative project at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.