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PARK PASSIVE: Seattle's First Certified Passive House by NK Architects

PARK PASSIVE: Seattle's First Certified Passive House by NK Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Park Passive is Seattle’s first certified Passive House, reducing heating consumption by nearly 90% to meet the rigorous standards for certification by the Passive House Academy and authorized by the Passivhaus Institut. Located on a small infill lot in Madison Park, this striking three-story modern home features a day-lit open stairwell with punctuated views to the street, double-height vaulted kitchen ceilings that visually connect the main living area to an upstairs kids play area, and an open floor plan that flows into a small yard. Park Passive is a model of innovative design that blends livability with sustainability.


Via Lauren Moss
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Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects

Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The Oakpass Residence in Beverly Hillls resembles a sleek modernist box wrapped in floor to ceiling glass, 12 feet above the ground on 10 narrow columns. The structure was elevated to not only circumvent the stringent  setback requirements, but to minimize the impact of development on the beautiful natural site, heavily wooded with oak trees.

This resulted in more light for the interior spaces, views from every room, and more privacy. Also it created a space underneath the house- part carport, part Zen garden. The pool is also elevated on 3 columns and the heavy exterior west facing concrete wall acts as a passive solar heat storage element.

The interior and exterior spaces blend seamlessly into each other due to the use of frameless floor to ceiling glass and a continuity of materials from the inside to the outside.


View more images of this minimalist, passive and site-responsive home at the link...


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Sustainable Housing in Denmark by Lendager Architects

Sustainable Housing in Denmark by Lendager Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Lendager Architects announced their first prize win in the competition to build the first DGNB-certified housing project in Denmark in Næstved.

DGNB is a new green building certification system expected to become the scale for sustainability in Europe. DGNB-Certification focuses on three equally weighted parameters: Environmental-, Social- and economical sustainability, for a holistic evaluation of built projects.

In total, the project will have 24 single family homes, built around a shared courtyard to encourage community and shared resources. Passive solar design with optimized window and shade placement allows for passive cooling and heating. Energy efficient design, including a tight thermal envelope with energy saving systems reduces power consumption, while rooftop photovoltaics produce electricity. Green roofs protect the home and provide further insulation. A close connection with nature and gardens encourages residents to live off the land.

As Lendager Architects told us about the project, “We wanted to answer the questions of how we can build without affecting the environment, how we can build without using new materials, how we can build houses that produce more energy than they use, and how sharing becomes a natural part of the daily life.”
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Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand

Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.


Architects Statement:

"Shoal Bay is a remote settlement on the rugged east coast of southern Hawkes Bay. The building is designed to be part of the rural setting, raised off the ground and sitting beside the original woolshed, which has served the bay since the early 1900's. The bach is rugged yet welcoming and offers unpretentious shelter, it is the type of place where you kick off your shoes and don't need to worry about walking sand through the house.
The bach is formed of two slightly off-set pavilions, one housing the bedrooms and the other the main living space. Decks are located at each end of the living pavilion allowing the sun to be followed throughout the day. Sliding screens at the north-west end provide adjustable shelter for the different wind conditions, offer privacy from neighbouring campers and act as walls for outside sleeping."


The sustainable, passive design features an interior spatial arrangement oriented for solar gain, shaded in the summer by the sliding shutters, which also provide shelter from the prevailing northwest winds. Also increasing the efficiency are high levels of insulation, along with solar panels that sit between the two pavilions...


Visit the link to view more images of this contemporary passive design that responds to its site and rural context...


Via Lauren Moss
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Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.