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Singapore National Stadium: the World's Largest Single-Span Dome

Singapore National Stadium: the World's Largest Single-Span Dome | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Singapore’s new National Stadium has the world’s largest single-span dome. And by leaving it open at one end, its designers have given the multi-purpose pitch one of the most beautiful backdrops in sport, with one of the most efficient structures possible.


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BogDan Wrzesinski's curator insight, December 3, 2014 2:37 AM

:) — ♛♥♪♥  Well done. Come Invite URL http://tsu.co/GodSent247 @GodSent247 #tsu

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Unique Solar Protection + A Dynamic Facade in Australia

Unique Solar Protection + A Dynamic Facade in Australia | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

 In Bunbury, down the coast from Perth in Australia, the architects at Gresley Abas seized the mission of modernizing a homeless shelter as an opportunity to clad the original building in a colourful and dynamic facade – using metal screens. On completion of the building work, Yanget House now houses 37 apartments as well as stores and offices on the first and second floors which generate rental income that goes toward financing the project.
Colt perforated panels provide solar protection on the east side.


Artist Rick Verney specially designed a 3D relief of projecting, angular elements that seem both transparent and sculptural thanks to the characteristic perforation pattern. The “shadow metal” consists of powder-coated anodized aluminum – the perforation pattern on the screens is not just a key design element, but also ensures light transmission and the passage of energy. The customized design thus spawned both sun shading and an unusually textured dynamic façade that is as good as unmistakable.


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UIWGroup's curator insight, July 11, 2014 8:47 AM

See we know how

Emanuele Naboni's curator insight, July 19, 2014 2:22 PM

3D Solar shading 

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70F | Sheep stable Almere

70F | Sheep stable Almere | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

The city of Almere has a sheep population of about 80 sheep. The sheep are mobilized to keep the powerful weed “acanthus” or “bears-breech” that grows in the “vroege vogel” – forest and “kromsloot” – park in Almere under control.


To centralize and house this population, a sheep stable was needed. The stable is designed with an a-symmetrical homogeneous cross-section. The part of the building where the sheep reside is relatively low; the high part is situated above the (public) pathway and the hay storage section, making it possible to store a maximum amount of hay.

This shape also creates a natural flow for the air inside the building, which is refreshed by two slits at the foot of each long side of the building.  The detailing of the corner of the building, where the long façade ends and the gable starts, is extremely important for the overall experience of the architecture of this building. It emphasises the cross sectional shape of the building, and finishes the long façade of the building, which starts as a façade and slowly becomes roof...


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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


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Matt Shlian: The Unconventional Artist and Paper Engineer

Matt Shlian: The Unconventional Artist and Paper Engineer | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it
Artist and designer Matt Shlian is a self-professed paper engineer whose work is something of a hybrid between art and science. With a proclivity for both geometry and the medium of paper, he is currently using origami to help engineers consider their work in three dimensions.

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Paläon, Germany: A Futuristic Design Reflects the Surroundings

Paläon, Germany: A Futuristic Design Reflects the Surroundings | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Paläon is located at the edge of the town of Schöningen and the site of a remarkable, world-famous Stone-Age find: the Schöningen Spears – the oldest ever hunting weapons used by man. It is now also home to the new and emblematic research and experience centre that reflects the location in concept and form.


The building conveys the location’s importance as an archaeological site by rising above the natural topography like layered earth. Its futuristic shape stems from the horizontal landscape and the building’s volume, ground plan and section are defined by references to the landscape and lines of sight. The slightly offset contours create subtly different internal and external spaces. Designed with reflective cladding, the volume mirrors the landscape, with large recessed window openings that underscore the expressive dynamism of the architecture.


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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
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No comment yet.
Rescooped by Proyecto Espacios from sustainable architecture
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Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture

Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture | PROYECTO ESPACIOS | Scoop.it

Located in rolling hillsides of Carmel, California, the Caterpillar House is a 2-bedroom, 2.5-bathroom dwelling that implements sustainable features and strategies for minimal development impact.


Feldman Architecture gave the client a home that connects seamlessly with the outdoors, in the form of a modern ranch with strong horizontal lines.

The house is quite literally made from the ground it sits on, with repurposed dirt from the site being used in the building of the walls. The “rammed earth walls” help keep the temperature steady because they act as a thermal mass. The house also utilizes natural ventilation to keep it cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

The roof integrates photovoltaic panels that produce all the required energy, and have been carefully integrated into the design...


View more imagery of the first LEED Platinum Custom Home on the California Central Coast and read the project description at Feldman Architecture.


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